Not about chameleons....grow a gut...or a decal valve...

Madmango

Established Member
I would think it’s is possible. iguana are related to chameleons. It’s very interesting that the guts make up change to a more diverse community of microbes.
Interesting 🤔 thanks for sharing
 

Sonny13

Chameleon Enthusiast
I think almost everything on this planet is able to adept. Check athletes, we know we need proteins and carbs for optimum results, still there’re vegetarians that perform better, with non animals matters.

They probably will find their resources to perform regularly as an alternative for insects.
 

Klyde O'Scope

Chameleon Enthusiast

I wonder where those additional microbes came from... :unsure:
Dissections revealed a possible reason: Vegetarians’ small intestines had grown 17% longer. Plus, their guts harbored a more diverse community of microbes than lizards on the typical diet, including higher numbers of a few microbe groups suspected to break down fiber, the team reports today in the Journal of Experimental Biology.

I think almost everything on this planet is able to ad[a]pt.
I can see that for omnivores—it might take many generations for exclusive carnivores/insectivores to adapt.

I've been curious about bearded dragons (distantly related to iguanas). The care sheets say they should eat 80%/20% insects/plants as babies/juveniles, progressing to 80%/20% plants/insects as adults. Mine never progressed. He wouldn't even touch any greens until post-brumation, and he's still primarily (over 50%) insectivore. There have been cases of other dragons who never adapt their diets, and it doesn't seem to affect them adversely. I wish he would adapt; roaches are far more expensive than greens & veggies!

Yes, I've tried the starvation strategy; he's a stubborn little bastard, and he'll starve himself to the point of losing too much weight.
 

Madmango

Established Member
@Klyde O'Scope
Here is a summary of a research study about greens. The study was done on humans but it does makes sense after reading the previous article about iguana cut bacteria.



A critical discovery about how bacteria feed on an unusual sugar molecule found in leafy green vegetables could hold the key to explaining how 'good' bacteria protect our gut and promote health. The finding suggests that leafy greens are essential for feeding good gut bacteria, limiting the ability of bad bacteria to colonize the gut by shutting them out of the prime 'real estate.'

for full article

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/02/160215114005.htm
Interesting that your Bearded dragon is more of it insectivore. He just shattered everything I thought I new about them🤣. They are on my one day list 💕
 

kinyonga

Chameleon Queen
Do chameleons like the veiled, that are known to nibble on greens, leaves, etc have caecal valves? If so, does this maybe give an indication that they are likely to be able to digest vegetation/leaves?
 

Klyde O'Scope

Chameleon Enthusiast
Interesting that your Bearded dragon is more of it insectivore. He just shattered everything I thought I new about them🤣. They are on my one day list 💕
It shouldn't. Like I said (not in so many words), he's an outlier—definitely not the norm.
He's been different in other ways as well; he was slow to "tame", doesn't like blueberries, and he's paper trained.
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They're all individuals, and all different to some degree or other. I think that just makes keeping reptiles as pets as interesting as other animals. It's kind of funny... when you (i.e. I ) talk with people with no reptile experience/exposure, they're often very surprised at the intelligence & personability, whereas they take it for granted in their cats, dogs, horses, birds, rodents, etc. 🤷‍♂️

Here's to your "one day" coming sooner than later! (y)

THX for the link! :)
 

Klyde O'Scope

Chameleon Enthusiast
Do chameleons like the veiled, that are known to nibble on greens, leaves, etc have caecal valves? If so, does this maybe give an indication that they are likely to be able to digest vegetation/leaves?
Is that the same as an ileocecal valve?
 

Klyde O'Scope

Chameleon Enthusiast
I just saw the dangdest thing... I tried a new source for crix today, because I was losing too many from the last source (50% in a week) and I was completely out. These were a little larger than the last, but not too large for his nibs. They did—however start immediately jumping out of the feeder cup, and one was climbing around on the ficus benjamina. He Who Still Has Not Been Named must have spotted the cricket from across the enclosure—he made a beeline for it.

Then he stopped just within range, stretched out his neck, and bit a leaf off the ficus, followed by an immediate, "Ptui!"

Then he crept forward one more step, and it was Zot!...Yoink!...Munch, Munch, Munch...Gulp!

He yanked a leaf out of the way of his hunting!

Visions of Marvin the Martian wanting to blow up the Earth because it obstructs his view of Venus.
 
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