My veild chameleon laid eggs

redhorse

Avid Member
I have never heard anyone adding heat pad to the bottom of a container like that. So not sure where your getting your advice from. I am sure someone has done it but I would not recommend. An almost 20 degree change might have done the damage already but we will hope for the best. They are cold blooded creatures and don't feel cold or cool like we do.

****Just my own experiment: I tested the egg temp when laid at 6" underground and it was 64 degrees. I life the eggs underground with a temp gauge under the sand. I place a heat lamp 25 watt (not to hot) over the egg laying bin. The temp reached 95 in the bin but underground never changed it stayed a constant 64. Mother nature and animals instinct for survival is amazing. I have done the same thing with turtle eggs and had same result. I am thinking the 6 or 7" of substrate is a buffer zone for temp on the surface. Not sure since I have not looked it up. Would be good research though and is probably common knowledge.. I like learning some things on my own- I am stubborn when it comes to that.*****

JMHO-From my experience- Set-up and be patient with little or no messing around with the eggs. I know it will be hard, I still struggle wanting to pick up the eggs too.

I don't because of losses I had early on. Even candling is extremely dangerous (many do it), my pics are only because they are on top of the substrate and I don't touch them. Our hands have oils that are not good for eggs and if the internal portion of the egg is trying to attach, the slightest movement can mess that up.

Birds have to rotate their eggs, ducks have to rotate and put water on their eggs, but some Chameleons lay eggs. The eggs are laid underground so nature will take its course. Sorry I am going on and on but sometime the obvious isn't so obvious for everyone. Thanks for understanding.

Just wanting the best results for you and potential babies.
FYI- Over the next month they will expand and get bigger so they won't look like a tic tac. (y) To much water will cause them to burst.
Moist, not wet.
Nice size clutch too....
 

Jairo1234

Member
80F inside the container?
I'd try not to let it go that night.
Yeah last night it went from 91 to 80 ish I have a thermometer that sayss at what time it went up and down but when I woke up it was at 89 but now it’s 79.3 F inside the container I have the thermometer inside
 

Jairo1234

Member
I have never heard anyone adding heat pad to the bottom of a container like that. So not sure where your getting your advice from. I am sure someone has done it but I would not recommend. An almost 20 degree change might have done the damage already but we will hope for the best. They are cold blooded creatures and don't feel cold or cool like we do.

****Just my own experiment: I tested the egg temp when laid at 6" underground and it was 64 degrees. I life the eggs underground with a temp gauge under the sand. I place a heat lamp 25 watt (not to hot) over the egg laying bin. The temp reached 95 in the bin but underground never changed it stayed a constant 64. Mother nature and animals instinct for survival is amazing. I have done the same thing with turtle eggs and had same result. I am thinking the 6 or 7" of substrate is a buffer zone for temp on the surface. Not sure since I have not looked it up. Would be good research though and is probably common knowledge.. I like learning some things on my own- I am stubborn when it comes to that.*****

JMHO-From my experience- Set-up and be patient with little or no messing around with the eggs. I know it will be hard, I still struggle wanting to pick up the eggs too.

I don't because of losses I had early on. Even candling is extremely dangerous (many do it), my pics are only because they are on top of the substrate and I don't touch them. Our hands have oils that are not good for eggs and if the internal portion of the egg is trying to attach, the slightest movement can mess that up.

Birds have to rotate their eggs, ducks have to rotate and put water on their eggs, but some Chameleons lay eggs. The eggs are laid underground so nature will take its course. Sorry I am going on and on but sometime the obvious isn't so obvious for everyone. Thanks for understanding.

Just wanting the best results for you and potential babies.
FYI- Over the next month they will expand and get bigger so they won't look like a tic tac. (y) To much water will cause them to burst.
Moist, not wet.
Nice size clutch too....
Yeah no worrie I understand and no I don’t want to move them anymore if I do candle Them it would be left alone
 

Jairo1234

Member
I have never heard anyone adding heat pad to the bottom of a container like that. So not sure where your getting your advice from. I am sure someone has done it but I would not recommend. An almost 20 degree change might have done the damage already but we will hope for the best. They are cold blooded creatures and don't feel cold or cool like we do.

****Just my own experiment: I tested the egg temp when laid at 6" underground and it was 64 degrees. I life the eggs underground with a temp gauge under the sand. I place a heat lamp 25 watt (not to hot) over the egg laying bin. The temp reached 95 in the bin but underground never changed it stayed a constant 64. Mother nature and animals instinct for survival is amazing. I have done the same thing with turtle eggs and had same result. I am thinking the 6 or 7" of substrate is a buffer zone for temp on the surface. Not sure since I have not looked it up. Would be good research though and is probably common knowledge.. I like learning some things on my own- I am stubborn when it comes to that.*****

JMHO-From my experience- Set-up and be patient with little or no messing around with the eggs. I know it will be hard, I still struggle wanting to pick up the eggs too.

I don't because of losses I had early on. Even candling is extremely dangerous (many do it), my pics are only because they are on top of the substrate and I don't touch them. Our hands have oils that are not good for eggs and if the internal portion of the egg is trying to attach, the slightest movement can mess that up.

Birds have to rotate their eggs, ducks have to rotate and put water on their eggs, but some Chameleons lay eggs. The eggs are laid underground so nature will take its course. Sorry I am going on and on but sometime the obvious isn't so obvious for everyone. Thanks for understanding.

Just wanting the best results for you and potential babies.
FYI- Over the next month they will expand and get bigger so they won't look like a tic tac. (y) To much water will cause them to burst.
Moist, not wet.
Nice size clutch too....
Here is a picture of mine
 

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redhorse

Avid Member
I will be glad to follow the updates because it is exciting. Sorry I went on and on but I would have had more success early on if someone was direct. There is way to much info and videos that are wrong and I followed them.

Thanks for being such a good sport.
If you do candle later on, make sure you get your camera ready before, so it is all very quick. Then you can review your camera and expand and see many other things (that is what I learned with my photos just recently) so I am a late bloomer.
 

Jairo1234

Member
I will be glad to follow the updates because it is exciting. Sorry I went on and on but I would have had more success early on if someone was direct. There is way to much info and videos that are wrong and I followed them.

Thanks for being such a good sport.
If you do candle later on, make sure you get your camera ready before, so it is all very quick. Then you can review your camera and expand and see many other things (that is what I learned with my photos just recently) so I am a late bloomer.
Yeah will do do an update and will do thanks
 

kinyonga

Chameleon Queen
There have been various studies done on different incubation temperatures of veiled eggs and temperature affects the outcome for sure.

I always incubated them at 74F and had a perfect hatch rate and survival rate. That being said, the temperatures fluctuated a couple of degrees off and on because my "incubator" wasn't closed in but open to the air. My "incubator consisted of a human heating pad that would remain on constantly over which a frame of wood and screen was placed to keep the containers above the pad...not on it. The containers were shoe box sized Tupperware type containers half filled with barely moist coarse trained vermiculite. I put a frame of cardboard around it to keep the light out and set it up in the basement.
I hatched veileds, panthers, deremensis, green water dragon eggs, tortoise eggs, gecko eggs, etc, etc using this "incubator.
 
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redhorse

Avid Member
Perfect!
I used sand a few years back (as suggested my many) and the sand grains would scratch the eggs as they expanded. Lesson learned, who would have thought sand grains would puncture holes in the egg shell? Not me. (y) I did loose about 15 eggs that way, they just started leaking out.
 

Jairo1234

Member
There have been various studies done on different incubation temperatures of veiled eggs and temperature affects the outcome for sure.

I always incubated them at 74F and had a perfect hatch rate and survival rate. That being said, the temperatures fluctuated a couple of degrees off and on because my "incubator" wasn't closed in but open to the air.
Oh ok I will just leave them at room temp which is around the 70s if it gets to cold I’ll use the heat pad
 

Jairo1234

Member
Perfect!
I used sand a few years back (as suggested my many) and the sand grains would scratch the eggs as they expanded. Lesson learned, who would have thought sand grains would puncture holes in the egg shell? Not me. (y) I did loose about 15 eggs that way, they just started leaking out.
Ohh sorry to hear that yeah once I was cleaning them the sand was on there hard but got it off
 
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