Keeping Humidity High in Low Humidity Areas?

tadeusz

Member
Humidity issues in Arizona is why I held off on getting a cham for years! Until I found a species that didn't require high levels of it!! I was between Verrocosus and Oustalet's... Ultimately choosing Oustalet's. Mine do great with humidity in the 30% range and I was able to achieve this by putting a clear shower curtain around the cage and misting twice a day. I couldn't imagine trying to get my humidity in the 50-60%+... I would have to run a humidifier all the time!
 

MATT2504

Member
tadeusz, your problem is the screened cage, why don't you get yourself a glass one? (then you can choose from many more types of chameleons)
 

ferretinmyshoes

Veterinarian
Staff member
your problem is the screened cage, why don't you get yourself a glass one?
Glass cages are not as common in the US as they are in Europe so we have very few options available for large glass cages. Too many areas in the US are too warm and humid to make glass cages a good choice. Usually the only designs available are too small (and incredibly heavy and expensive) for adults of any large species. We make up for it by mounting plexiglass or shower curtains on the side of screen cages that are better suited for most areas and adult species. Glass cages generally limit you to consider to smaller species, which is not altogether bad. Just depends on personal preference.
 

MATT2504

Member
Large glass cages are not all to common in europe either! (not that i have come across) that's why iam designing and building my own (inexpensive) cage. It will have 6 inch mesh vents just above the planted base on all 4 sides, and either glass or plexi for the rest.
 

tadeusz

Member
tadeusz, your problem is the screened cage, why don't you get yourself a glass one? (then you can choose from many more types of chameleons)
Of course that is an option, but it does get pricey as most larger cages are screen. I've also heard of owners having issues with glass cages. I wanted more of a desert type species that I could basically keep outdoors for about 9 months of the year. With Arizona averages in the 90s-100s I'm happy I found a cham species that fits.
 

tadeusz

Member
Large glass cages are not all to common in europe either! (not that i have come across) that's why iam designing and building my own (inexpensive) cage. It will have 6 inch mesh vents just above the planted base on all 4 sides, and either glass or plexi for the rest.
Also, I did try live plants and that did help raise humidity but, I ran into gnat issues and decided to do something different to get optimal humidity
 

MATT2504

Member
Also, I did try live plants and that did help raise humidity but, I ran into gnat issues and decided to do something different to get optimal humidity

How did you get rid of the gnats? i have been looking at co2 for situations like those, i know it seems a bit of an overkill but with a planted base the little critters will get everywhere if/when i get an infestation.
As an added bonus the plants will love the co2 fog twice a month :D
 

tadeusz

Member
I just got rid of the live plants all together. I tried swapping soil and then using sand mixture, nothing would work.
 

Kathy S

Member
I know this is an old thread, but I just bought a baby CB oustalet's, was searching about that species and found your remarks about gnats. About the gnats (ie fruit flies): I keep one of those glass fruitfly catching jars that looks pretty and is open in the bottom hanging in the shower in the bathroom where I keep my reptiles. You put beer and a few sections of orange in the bottom and all the stray fruitflies go in there. They will breed in there too. It has been a great emergency food for tiny lizards and praying mantises in the dead of winter. I put the whole jar in the screen cage and take off the lid. Voila, food for a week if they can catch it. the jars are available from many gardener's catalogues.
 
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