I want to do it right

ChamDur

Member
Hey everyone,
Just some info about myself to start. I've been on the forums for a while. I'm not super new, but I'm still learning. I'm a very young teenager living in California. I don't have a chameleon but I really want one. Im very reaponsible but there is three issues. 1st- I don't think I have the room. I could build a cage and get all the supplies. But the cage would have to go in a corner in my room is that okay for the chameleon? 2nd- My mom is fine with me getting a chameleon but my dad isn't. Any good tips in convincing him? I'm trying to show that I am responsible to him now. 3rd- This is my biggest issue. In being responsible I don't want to be an owner that gets bored. I don't want to get a chameleon and then after a month or so not want to have the chameleon. Will having a chameleon get boring after a while. I wouldn't want to ditch mine. (I also have school so idk if I'll be able to feed it 7 30 to 4 30). Thanks in advance. When you are adressing the problems please tell me what problem you are adressing. Thanks again :)
 

ERKleRose

Chameleon Enthusiast
Hey everyone,
Just some info about myself to start. I've been on the forums for a while. I'm not super new, but I'm still learning. I'm a very young teenager living in California. I don't have a chameleon but I really want one. Im very reaponsible but there is three issues. 1st- I don't think I have the room. I could build a cage and get all the supplies. But the cage would have to go in a corner in my room is that okay for the chameleon? 2nd- My mom is fine with me getting a chameleon but my dad isn't. Any good tips in convincing him? I'm trying to show that I am responsible to him now. 3rd- This is my biggest issue. In being responsible I don't want to be an owner that gets bored. I don't want to get a chameleon and then after a month or so not want to have the chameleon. Will having a chameleon get boring after a while. I wouldn't want to ditch mine. (I also have school so idk if I'll be able to feed it 7 30 to 4 30). Thanks in advance. When you are adressing the problems please tell me what problem you are adressing. Thanks again :)
For the feeding, if you get an adult or subadult, you only have to feed in the morning everyday/every other day
 

ERKleRose

Chameleon Enthusiast
For your other questions, as long as it’s fairly quiet and not drafty, your room should be fine (as long as you don’t mind sleeping next to lots of bugs). Make sure both parents are 100% on board, make a PowerPoint/spreadsheet/essay on everything known to man about chameleons and their care. Do a budget layout also. If dealing with lots of bugs and not really handling your chameleon is fine with you, hopefully you won’t get bored. Kudos to thinking about this first! Think of chameleons like fish, pretty to look at but not meant to handle
 

ChamDur

Member
Btw, do you think underground reptiles sell good chameleons. I was looking into them. They seemed pretty good. They have been selling reptiles for a while.
 

absolutbill

Chameleon Enthusiast
I will just ask you one question - since you are a young teenager, what will happen when you graduate high school? I understand the desire to have a chameleon, that's why we are all here. However, as you get older, you will have more and more activities to do in school, after school, and then it may be time for college for you. Will you honestly have the time and commitment to a chameleon down the road? They can (with proper care), live 8 years, so presuming you are 13 or 14, you only have 4-5 years before you may head off to college (not saying you have to do that, only that it's a fairly standard rite of passage to move out and on with your life after high school). Then what? What if you can't take your chameleon with you to college, or you want to move out of the country and can't take him/her with you? I'm not telling you not to get a chameleon, just to consider your timeline. Perhaps it might be better to use this time to continue to research, then when you are on your own you can more accurately judge if you have the time and resources to have one as a pet.
 

ChamDur

Member
I will just ask you one question - since you are a young teenager, what will happen when you graduate high school? I understand the desire to have a chameleon, that's why we are all here. However, as you get older, you will have more and more activities to do in school, after school, and then it may be time for college for you. Will you honestly have the time and commitment to a chameleon down the road? They can (with proper care), live 8 years, so presuming you are 13 or 14, you only have 4-5 years before you may head off to college (not saying you have to do that, only that it's a fairly standard rite of passage to move out and on with your life after high school). Then what? What if you can't take your chameleon with you to college, or you want to move out of the country and can't take him/her with you? I'm not telling you not to get a chameleon, just to consider your timeline. Perhaps it might be better to use this time to continue to research, then when you are on your own you can more accurately judge if you have the time and resources to have one as a pet.
Your right, thanks for the feedback. I guess your right.
 

ERKleRose

Chameleon Enthusiast
I’m 19 and have tons of pets. I’m in college, about to move out of the parentals’ house (yes, I’m taking all of my pets with me, wasn’t even an option) and was very active in high school (FFA, 4 clubs) and have odd end jobs. If you’re committed enough, everything will work out (with lots of practice, planning, and budgeting, of course!)
 

ChamDur

Member
I’m 19 and have tons of pets. I’m in college, about to move out of the parentals’ house (yes, I’m taking all of my pets with me, wasn’t even an option) and was very active in high school (FFA, 4 clubs) and have odd end jobs. If you’re committed enough, everything will work out (with lots of practice, planning, and budgeting, of course!)
Nice, thanks
 

Jesspete

Avid Member
Have you kept reptiles at all before? Chameleons have very specific and intensive needs. It might be better to show your parents you can be responsible with something really simple, like a crested gecko. With that species, you can handle them, and they don't require live bugs. You can also get a smaller enclosure. That may show the parents that reptiles are ok. It would be terrible to get a chameleon, have it die prematurely (not that you would kill it, but it's a lot easier to do than keeping them alive) and prove your dad right. I would suggest start easy, and work your way up if it keeps your interest.

As a mom, if I knew what keeping a chameleon entailed, I would not allow my children to get one. It's like the difference between a betta fish in a bowl, versus a saltwater reef tank.
 
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