Hawaii....dusts...volcanic lava...Kenya...jacksons...

kinyonga

Chameleon Enthusiast
Hawaii...
Would any of this contribute to the difference in size and the crooked horns found in the Hawaiian jacksons compared to the ones from Kenya?

Like Kenya, Hawaii supports a cement industry...
https://www.hawaiiancement.com/locations
Cement formula...
"tricalcium silicate (3CaO · SiO2), dicalcium silicate (2CaO · SiO2), tricalcium aluminate (3CaO · Al2O3), and a tetra-calcium aluminoferrite (4CaO · Al2O3Fe2O3)"...
https://www.britannica.com/technolo.../The-major-cements-composition-and-properties

"Hawaiian lavas have a lower silica content & are rich in iron, magnesium, and calcium".
Read the part under Hitchhikers too...
https://books.google.ca/books?id=Nze4dt-TtnIC&pg=PA478&lpg=PA478&dq=dust+in+the+air+hawaii+calcium&source=bl&ots=6DMvo8WErz&sig=ACfU3U2Gs16REso-kvO0SSYzoC8-UMwORA&hl=en&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwir4Pbg4uHmAhVkkeAKHSsrBb44ChDoATABegQIBhAB#v=onepage&q=dust in the air hawaii calcium&f=false

https://www.discovermagazine.com/environment/blown-away
"In the 1960s an analysis of Hawaiian soil found that some of its quartz content is derived from Gobi sand. Satellite data have since confirmed that a dust corridor extends from China to the Hawaiian archipelago"

Kenya...
See page 171...
http://old.worldagroforestry.org/Units/Library/Books/PDFs/11_Rocks_for_crops.pdf
"limestone for the cement industry"

"The geology of Kenya is characterized by Archean granite/greenstone terrain in western Kenya along Lake Victoria, the Neoproterozoic 'Pan-African' Mozambique Belt, which underlies the central part of the country and Mesozoic to Recent sediments underlying the eastern coastal areas. The Eastern Rift Valley crosses Kenya from north to south and the volcanics associated with rift formation largely obliterate the generally north-south striking Neoproterozoic Mozambique Belt (Schlueter 1997). Rift Valley volcanogenic sediments and lacustrine and alluvial sediments cover large parts of the Eastern Rift"
 
Last edited:

Kaizen

Chameleon Enthusiast
Hawaii...
Would any of this contribute to the difference in size and the crooked horns found in the Hawaiian jacksons compared to the ones from Kenya?

Like Kenya, Hawaii supports a cement industry...
https://www.hawaiiancement.com/locations

"Hawaiian lavas have a lower silica content &I are rich in iron, magnesium, and calcium".
Read the part under Hitchhikers too...
https://books.google.ca/books?id=Nze4dt-TtnIC&pg=PA478&lpg=PA478&dq=dust+in+the+air+hawaii+calcium&source=bl&ots=6DMvo8WErz&sig=ACfU3U2Gs16REso-kvO0SSYzoC8-UMwORA&hl=en&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwir4Pbg4uHmAhVkkeAKHSsrBb44ChDoATABegQIBhAB#v=onepage&q=dust in the air hawaii calcium&f=false

https://www.discovermagazine.com/environment/blown-away
"In the 1960s an analysis of Hawaiian soil found that some of its quartz content is derived from Gobi sand. Satellite data have since confirmed that a dust corridor extends from China to the Hawaiian archipelago"

Kenya...
See page 171...
http://old.worldagroforestry.org/Units/Library/Books/PDFs/11_Rocks_for_crops.pdf
"limestone for the cement industry"

"The geology of Kenya is characterized by Archean granite/greenstone terrain in western Kenya along Lake Victoria, the Neoproterozoic 'Pan-African' Mozambique Belt, which underlies the central part of the country and Mesozoic to Recent sediments underlying the eastern coastal areas. The Eastern Rift Valley crosses Kenya from north to south and the volcanics associated with rift formation largely obliterate the generally north-south striking Neoproterozoic Mozambique Belt (Schlueter 1997). Rift Valley volcanogenic sediments and lacustrine and alluvial sediments cover large parts of the Eastern Rift"
I have actually wondered this myself. All the lakes in the Rift Valley have a very high ph. Tanganika’s ph is like 8-8.3, which testifies to the amount of limestone in that area. I’d be surprised if the sheer amount of environmental calcium didn’t make into the food chain in east Africa.
 

Kaizen

Chameleon Enthusiast
You sure its not just the fact they released like 10-20 animals at 1 time in the 1970's, and every jackson today is a multi generational inbred from that first dozen or so?
I think that certainly has something to do with it. But my guess is that it’s a number of factors, including inbreeding, availability of environmental calcium, etc.
 

kinyonga

Chameleon Enthusiast
I'm sure the small number has something to do with it too...but what about the size...is that just from the gene pool too?
 
Top Bottom