hanging potted plants?

g schrock

New Member
i read on here the other day (real quick, and i dont remember who it was) about someone who hung his plants to remove clutter on the bottom of the cage. I have the typical zoomed screen cage, and i cant think of how to hang the plants off the screen? would i run a support bar along the top? anyone who has done this and can share info / pics would be great. i have the next two days off and would like to tackle this over my weekend :D
 

pssh

Avid Member
Yes, you can put a bar on top to hang them from, or you can use some fishing line to rig it to the frame of the cage. I like the clear fishing line because it makes them look like they are floating in the cage. Plus I use it to loosely tie the vines from pothos to the screen and other branches so that there are even more "highways" for them to climb around on. It makes the cage very full while keeping the bottom clear for easy cleaning.
 

Olimpia

Biologist & Ecologist
Ditto what Kara said.

I buy those 8' x 1" x 2" bars of wood from Lowe's, cut them to just slightly over the width of the cage so the two ends sit on the frame itself, and then use 50lb fishing line to hang the pants from the bar. I love the fishing line because it's clear, like Kara said, but it can be threaded through the screen and won't ruin it.

Also, in case you ask, I used thumb tacks through the screen to pin the branches up. Again, doesn't ruin the screen and it holds up surprisingly well.

hangingplants.jpg


This cage looks so bare to me now! This is right after it was first set up, and over the next few months many more branches were added and the pothos plant really started taking over. It looks a lot fuller now.
 

smhenchliffe

New Member
Uv and Fishing line

Guys you do know that Uv will make the fishing line break down fast right??? you dont want it to fall down 1 day :)
 

Solid Snake

Avid Member
I like to screw hooks into the inside frame, and run 550 cord from the hooks to the plant.

This has numerous benefits.

It allows you to have more plants.

It allows you to create a "canopy" area.

This allows you to have your misting nozzles hit the high-up hanging plant, and have the water "rain" off of it.

This gives you mist, and drops in one.

Pothos works well for this.

Le examples:

First 30 sec of this vid:

Hook installation examples in this cage build:

http://s618.photobucket.com/user/davidfishman/library/Cage Build?sort=2&page=1

I dont like fishing line in the cage.

Too much risk in my opinion, and 550 cord can be climbed by most chameleons and will last forever...or just about.
 

Olimpia

Biologist & Ecologist
Guys you do know that Uv will make the fishing line break down fast right??? you dont want it to fall down 1 day :)

Mine is still there over a year and a half later! Remember that UVB bulbs are pretty feeble in their UVB output compared to the sun, so they aren't going to deteriorate things like they would if they were sitting outside at noon every day.
 

nick barta

Chameleon Enthusiast
Site Sponsor
I like to screw hooks into the inside frame, and run 550 cord from the hooks to the plant.

This has numerous benefits.

It allows you to have more plants.

It allows you to create a "canopy" area.

This allows you to have your misting nozzles hit the high-up hanging plant, and have the water "rain" off of it.

This gives you mist, and drops in one.

Pothos works well for this.

Le examples:

First 30 sec of this vid:

Hook installation examples in this cage build:

http://s618.photobucket.com/user/davidfishman/library/Cage Build?sort=2&page=1

I dont like fishing line in the cage.

Too much risk in my opinion, and 550 cord can be climbed by most chameleons and will last forever...or just about.

Can you give a picture of 550 cord?
 

MelissaB

Avid Member
Olympia, how well do the bromeliads hold up? I'd love to put a few in my guy's cage, but wasn't sure how long they would last.
 

Olimpia

Biologist & Ecologist
Olympia, how well do the bromeliads hold up? I'd love to put a few in my guy's cage, but wasn't sure how long they would last.

The ones that weren't directly under the water did better than those that were, as they would end up collecting too much water and the leaves would rot off at the base. But the ones that dried out between mistings lasted months until I decided to move them somewhere else in the house. The pothos took over and I couldn't see the bromeliads any more so I put them on the balcony where I could enjoy them.
 
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