Glass terrarium

KyleFitzz

New Member
I'm thinking of putting my 3 month old female nosy be in a glass terrarium instead of a screened enclosure. It would help a lot with humidity control and more importantly, temp control. I've seen many people with glass enclosures and they have very healthy chameleons.
 

ISA my Veiled

New Member
The only reason why I don't like glass terrariums is that they don't really allow drainage to well. I think what I have seen the most is people put paper towel down for substrate and have to change it just about everyday or so. In my opinion it makes for more work than you want. If humidity is a concern I would just buy a misting system to control it, or some live plants. Nothing is wrong with glass enclosures if you have the right one like an exoterra but I think it doesn't allow you as much space and options as a screen. I mean I think the largest Exo terra goes 36x18x18 if I'm correct. While with screen you can go a bit larger and have add ons as well as custom build a cage if you are crafty enough. If temp control is a problem maybe your house is drafty? Usually the temperature shouldn't be a problem depending on where you place your lights or basking bulb. I would take screen over glass just for those reasons, I also like the way I can set up the cage a lot more, I can hook things to the side put dowels in without complication and set up my lights differently. But again my main concern would be drainage.
 

KyleFitzz

New Member
Well I already have screen enclosures and have had success with them, I was just curious about glass enclosures. I'm sure people with them use hydro balls and all the help with water absorbtion and all. My Jackson's is in a 2x2x4 enclosure with all live plants and temps are perfect. But the panthers need a warmer environment and figured glass would help until I move out in 2 months
 

ISA my Veiled

New Member
Yeah glass terrariums are great for smaller species like pygmies where you can use the hydro balls and set up a good substrate but with how large the panther is gonna get your going to want more space I think. Yeah if it works well for your jacksons I don't think it will be a problem with the panther just because you don't need as high of humidity and you can throw on a stronger bulb for the Panther. I know you've done your research obviously so you want something around the early 80s for a basking spot if he is just 3 months old. But as long as you have a strong enough bulb, like I use a 100w household bulb off a few inches from the top of the cage for my Male Veiled who is around 6 months old and it works out very well. Basking spot is around 86-89 depending on how drafty my apartment gets. And have fun moving out!! I just moved all my guys into my new apartment last month and oh my gosh what a hassle lol Set up my chameleon room nicely though!
 

coldbloodedAL

Avid Member
Glass enclosures are great. But.. For a pardalis, you need a large one. Exo terras 36x18x36 would be the smallest I would go. Anything bigger, your looking at a Protean terrarium($$$), or some other custom one.

Glass cages are meant to be planted, no paper towels or bare bottom. The water sitting in the bottom will only cause problems.
 

KyleFitzz

New Member
Yeah it's going to be fun and trust me I've done all of my research and def know what I'm doing haha. But the glass would be temporary. I have found would and glass set ups that work very nice, they have cabinets underneath as well. Meaning i would drill a hole in the bottom and use that for drainage. So we will see what happens. These enclosures are very nice and I've seen great success with them!
 

KyleFitzz

New Member
What kind of substrate and all would you use at the bottom for planting a couple umbrellas and maybe a dracena?!
 

ISA my Veiled

New Member
Yeah it's going to be fun and trust me I've done all of my research and def know what I'm doing haha. But the glass would be temporary. I have found would and glass set ups that work very nice, they have cabinets underneath as well. Meaning i would drill a hole in the bottom and use that for drainage. So we will see what happens. These enclosures are very nice and I've seen great success with them!
Thats a lot of money just for a temporary enclosure that you're only going to use for a few months. I think you would be better off just buying a larger screen cage for him. I don't know if I'm right but I thin you need a special type of drill to drill glass.. I would not try it with a house hold drill lol you will tear that thing up and destroy it. Again this is why I think screen cages and a lot easier, simply drill some holds in the bottom and bam theres your drainage! lol Just throw a bucket under your stand and its over.
 

Hoj

Friendly Grasshopper
I raise many of my little ones in glass exoterra terrariums and really like it, here in Canada it really can help with the the varying temps and humidity.
 

ISA my Veiled

New Member
I raise many of my little ones in glass exoterra terrariums and really like it, here in Canada it really can help with the the varying temps and humidity.
And that should also affect your decision in the end, like Hoj said around Canada the temperatures are always changing along with humidity and such. Some places are better for screen cages and others aren't.
 

Bug Trader

New Member
ABG mix is the viv soil mix the Atlanta Botanical Gardens created years back its well drained, good for live plants and lasts longer and doesn't break down like most mixes do. Its widely used in the dart frog hobby.
 

Carlton

Chameleon Enthusiast
Glass enclosures are great. But.. For a pardalis, you need a large one. Exo terras 36x18x36 would be the smallest I would go. Anything bigger, your looking at a Protean terrarium($$$), or some other custom one.

Glass cages are meant to be planted, no paper towels or bare bottom. The water sitting in the bottom will only cause problems.
Drainage aside, the sizes for these cages are just so limited, especially for arboreal species. You just don't have much room too do much with them. Consider this option...make a larger screen cage and add the glass TO it. Or rather, plexiglass. I have a nice large coated mesh cage (3'x4'x5') I can set up for more or less humidity with removable plexiglass "storm windows". They attach over the mesh with simple plastic screen door panel clips. I can pretty much create the equivalent of an ExoTerra's closed in format but much more generous. The humidity levels in this cage are very stable. Then when season or weather allows, I can open it up panel by panel. Works great!
 

tdismang

New Member
Drainage aside, the sizes for these cages are just so limited, especially for arboreal species. You just don't have much room too do much with them. Consider this option...make a larger screen cage and add the glass TO it. Or rather, plexiglass. I have a nice large coated mesh cage (3'x4'x5') I can set up for more or less humidity with removable plexiglass "storm windows". They attach over the mesh with simple plastic screen door panel clips. I can pretty much create the equivalent of an ExoTerra's closed in format but much more generous. The humidity levels in this cage are very stable. Then when season or weather allows, I can open it up panel by panel. Works great!
oh no you didn't. you just gave me a GREAT idea for my new screen cage. great, just when i thought i was done tweaking it :p
 

tdismang

New Member
sorry if that sounded sarcastic. lol! I was just posting about how I've been obsessing over making adjustments and add-ons to my new cham cage. that really is an awesome idea!
 

Carlton

Chameleon Enthusiast
sorry if that sounded sarcastic. lol! I was just posting about how I've been obsessing over making adjustments and add-ons to my new cham cage. that really is an awesome idea!
Sometimes if you turn a problem completely around and look at it differently the old lightbulb over your head lights up!
 
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