Female Nosey be care/breeding

So I'm doing quite a bit of research on how to properly take care of/breed female panther chameleons . .
A few big questions I have are about the eggs both fertile and non-fertile.

How often does a non- fertile panther chameleon lay eggs in a year?
How many clutches can your female chameleon have in a year (safety without harm to the female)?
Lastly if I plan to breed my female just once in that year how many times can I expect her to lay non fertile eggs after that or in other words in that year?
 

cloverthechameleon

Avid Member
Female Panthers can lay infertile clutches from as early as 5-6 months old, in rare cases even earlier. They can cycle infetile clutches often ive had females lay infertile clutches then soon after be gravid with infertile clutches again and lay 45-50 days after. (Not good)
Once a female has reached sexualy maturaty you want to cut down feeding to once every 2 days or 3-4 times a week. When a female is gravid with infetile clutches you want to lower termperatures and feeding slightly to lower the egg count. This is a good rule to follow even if the clutch is predicted to be fertile, since the health of your chameleon should always be number 1 priorty especially over the profit youll make from a larger clutch. From expirience smaller well monitored clutches are usually stronger and healthier. And your last question, Females can retain sperm 1 breeding session can result in multiple fertile clutches. They do not always retain sperm but it is possible. lastly, if youre new to chameleons and want to jump right into a breeding project id advise otherwise. Id start with a juvenile or juveniles, watch them grow watch them mature and learn there tendencies. Chameleon breeding is a lot of trial and error and is not really profitable unless on a larger well established scale. Even if your husbandry is not perfect what ive noticed in my 10 years keeping chameleons is that consistency is key.
 
This is an awesome response. SO INFORMATIVE AND EXACTLY WHAT I WAS LOOKING FOR. (Thank you!!) I am not planning on jumping into breeding these amazing creatures off the bat. I defiantly want to establish the basics of proper chameleon care before I would delve into such a calculated endeavor. However, I am highly interested in the entire process and by better understanding the entire life cycle and processes of these creatures I hope develop more knowledge and insight on how to better care for my little guys and gals. One day I do hope to have a clutch or two of my own... but of course I will wait until I have obtained the correct materials, knowledge and experience! Thanks again for responding to this thread :)
 
Female Panthers can lay infertile clutches from as early as 5-6 months old, in rare cases even earlier. They can cycle infetile clutches often ive had females lay infertile clutches then soon after be gravid with infertile clutches again and lay 45-50 days after. (Not good)
Once a female has reached sexualy maturaty you want to cut down feeding to once every 2 days or 3-4 times a week. When a female is gravid with infetile clutches you want to lower termperatures and feeding slightly to lower the egg count. This is a good rule to follow even if the clutch is predicted to be fertile, since the health of your chameleon should always be number 1 priorty especially over the profit youll make from a larger clutch. From expirience smaller well monitored clutches are usually stronger and healthier. And your last question, Females can retain sperm 1 breeding session can result in multiple fertile clutches. They do not always retain sperm but it is possible. lastly, if youre new to chameleons and want to jump right into a breeding project id advise otherwise. Id start with a juvenile or juveniles, watch them grow watch them mature and learn there tendencies. Chameleon breeding is a lot of trial and error and is not really profitable unless on a larger well established scale. Even if your husbandry is not perfect what ive noticed in my 10 years keeping chameleons is that consistency is key.
This is an awesome response. SO INFORMATIVE AND EXACTLY WHAT I WAS LOOKING FOR. (Thank you!!) I am not planning on jumping into breeding these amazing creatures off the bat. I defiantly want to establish the basics of proper chameleon care before I would delve into such a calculated endeavor. However, I am highly interested in the entire process and by better understanding the entire life cycle and processes of these creatures I hope develop more knowledge and insight on how to better care for my little guys and gals. One day I do hope to have a clutch or two of my own... but of course I will wait until I have obtained the correct materials, knowledge and experience! Thanks again for responding to this thread :)
 
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