Feeding Stick Insects

Hey guys,
So my stick bugs are really starting to explode, and I am getting over run! I want to know what everyone's opinions are on how often and how many stick bugs can be fed to a chameleon. I can't imagine they are very nutritious, so I have always treated them as a treat. That being said, I have so many of them now that I might have to consider transferring a whole stick bug colony into a separate cage. They are the typical Indian Walking Stick Insects for anyone who is interested in the technicalities.

Thanks for all of your input,

Travis
 

CLP

New Member
Come to Canada and you can have a few =P Don't even think I'm supposed to have them, shhhh.
They're legal here in Nova Scotia. They occassionally sell them in the pet stores as pets. I have been hoping to add them to my feeder list, but need some more room. We're looking at houses now in the hopes of moving to something bigger. I'm hoping to have a larger utility room for keeping all my bugs :p
 

laurie

Retired Moderator
It all depends on the size of the stick bug and the size of the Cham. For some of my small chams, juvi quads and carpets, I will put 10 very small sticks in a day if I have a million sticks. For my adult quad female only 2 adult Indian walking sticks every other day. So far this has worked very well for me.
 

pasquia

New Member
Have you ever tried Macleay's spectre stick insects ?
My Panthers really like the smaller ones and move more than the Indians.
 
They're legal here in Nova Scotia. They occassionally sell them in the pet stores as pets. I have been hoping to add them to my feeder list, but need some more room. We're looking at houses now in the hopes of moving to something bigger. I'm hoping to have a larger utility room for keeping all my bugs :p
I live in a 2 floor, 3 bedroom house and yet I am ALWAYS short of room. This chameleon and dart frog addiction is worse than being a hoarder ;)

It all depends on the size of the stick bug and the size of the Cham. For some of my small chams, juvi quads and carpets, I will put 10 very small sticks in a day if I have a million sticks. For my adult quad female only 2 adult Indian walking sticks every other day. So far this has worked very well for me.
That's terrific news! Thank you Laurie. My youngest (5 months) panther could probably eat 10 no problem. Time to feed!!

Have you ever tried Macleay's spectre stick insects ?
My Panthers really like the smaller ones and move more than the Indians.
I've never heard of those, and I don't think I will ever see them locally. It's hard enough as it is to get ahold of a variety of feeders in BC, Canada. Too many regulations.
EDIT** Just realized that I actually used to have a Macleay, but it passed away after about 6 months. Laid a million eggs. Still hoping for them to hatch though. I read that the incubation process can take a while.
 

pasquia

New Member
Yes the eggs take up to 6 - 8 months to hatch usually, even under ideal incubation conditions- large Tupperware with soil/ peat kept damp and warm
However the females are prolific egg layers and the juvenile stages are really meaty snacks!!
 

pasquia

New Member
If you have lots of eggs from a mated female then you should get enough to hatch to get a breeding colony going year round-should be plenty of brambles in Stanley park I expect most of the year, if not get Salal either pick yourself or buy from a flower shop-it's BC grown anyway I think. I feed that during the winter when there is nothing else and they do fine eating that- have an arrangement with my local flower shop to buy a bunch a week
 

laurie

Retired Moderator
What is that you buy? Feeding sticks in winter is a major problem for me, I am down to -20 f part of the time. I live further north than some of my friends in Canada.
 
If you have lots of eggs from a mated female then you should get enough to hatch to get a breeding colony going year round-should be plenty of brambles in Stanley park I expect most of the year, if not get Salal either pick yourself or buy from a flower shop-it's BC grown anyway I think. I feed that during the winter when there is nothing else and they do fine eating that- have an arrangement with my local flower shop to buy a bunch a week
Awesome advice! Thanks so much. Always great to hear from other locals.
 

pasquia

New Member
Salal is a woodland shrub with large green leaves used in flower arrangements. I live In Manitoba that is as plant friendly as the arctic in winter.So I am heavily reliant on buying Salal from my local flower store, they sell it to me by the bunch and I have a deal with them to get some weekly through the winter until I can get raspberry canes again in the spring.Most of my Phasmids will eat it( but not Ramulus species). The Macleay's love it and can be used as the sole food source over the winter.The Salal is wild harvested from Pacific coast forests so I have never had any issues with it having been sprayed with pesticides as flowers from stores often have. Keep the stems in a jug of water and it will stay edible for at least a week at room temps, typically by then the insects have grazed the leaves away till just stems remain.
Google the Salal but as far as I know it is used most places for flower arrangements- it was a fellow stick insect keeper in Denmark who put me onto that originally.
Hope that helps!
 

imcurt

Established Member
Laura, I have been feeding mine romaine and red leaf lettuce along with the rose or berry vine. They are producing almost twice as many eggs when I feed them lettuce.Im sure the water content has something to do with it.Try some,Im sure yours will eat lettuce too.


What is that you buy? Feeding sticks in winter is a major problem for me, I am down to -20 f part of the time. I live further north than some of my friends in Canada.
 
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