Feeding hatchlings BSFL vs traditional fruitflies/crickets

44937

Member
Has anyone ever tried feeding BSFL to one group of hatchlings and with another group of hatchlings with the traditional fruit flies/crickets method?
There seems to be considerable advantages to BSFL when comparing BSFL to other feeders especially the calcium to phosphorus ratios. I would love to see if there is a difference in growth rates between the two groups if this can be successfully accomplished.
I currently have 4 eggs in incubation and I may try this when they hatch. But with only two hatchlings in each group the results may not be as accurate than with a full clutch of 25-35 hatchlings.
 

ERKleRose

Chameleon Enthusiast
Has anyone ever tried feeding BSFL to one group of hatchlings and with another group of hatchlings with the traditional fruit flies/crickets method?
There seems to be considerable advantages to BSFL when comparing BSFL to other feeders especially the calcium to phosphorus ratios. I would love to see if there is a difference in growth rates between the two groups if this can be successfully accomplished.
I currently have 4 eggs in incubation and I may try this when they hatch. But with only two hatchlings in each group the results may not be as accurate than with a full clutch of 25-35 hatchlings.
As long as they’re appropriately sized and aren’t fed too often (have been known to cause constipation), I don’t see why not. Isopods are great feeders for small chams, too
 
Feed small amounts at first and check the stools for shed skins of the BSFL. If you're feeding small amounts and they cannot be fully digested, they should pass the partially digested worms. I've had this happens with some salamanders so I stopped feeding them to those particular salamanders. Have not seen it in my lizards so far. There was a study that showed that mountain chicken frogs digested only 44% of black soldier fly larvae fed to them live, but that number went up to 77% when the larvae were mashed
 
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