Egg hatching question

Scott2142

New Member
Hey everyone, I have a question about the eggs I get from my female Carpet last year. She mated with a male(both of them passed away) last October, she showed gravid body color after and laid 11 healthy looking eggs on last November 26th, and I kept the eggs in one of the incubation box( in the correct temp/humid range) until now, no sight of mold, but none of them show any veins when I candle them neither, normally the unfertilized ones will go bad in a month or so, but mine had been incubated for over 5 months nothing happened except the eggs grew bigger. Is this normal? Should they be disposed?? Thanks
 
I never candle my eggs since it lowers hatch rates (always make sure not to rotate the eggs if you candle them). As a rule, if the eggs are not molding they are still viable. I do not know how long their incubation should be. It is normal for chameleon eggs to grow bigger over time as they incubate.
 

Dooley1

Avid Member
I've been breeding Furcifer lateralis (carpets) for 15 years and have 9th generation animals now. If you incubate the eggs at a constant 68-74F you will get hatchlings between 9-12 months on average, usually hatching scattered. So, it is not unusual not to see veins yet at 5 months. I use a 30g vermiculite/20g of water ratio in deli containers with no holes in the lid.

If you incubate with a diapause as follows: 45 days 70F/45 days at 60F/then remainder at 70-72F, they generally hatch around 6-7 months.

I have always candled eggs and never had problems with hatch rates. Carpets incubated properly generally hatch near 100%.

Thanks,

Kevin
 

Scott2142

New Member
I've been breeding Furcifer lateralis (carpets) for 15 years and have 9th generation animals now. If you incubate the eggs at a constant 68-74F you will get hatchlings between 9-12 months on average, usually hatching scattered. So, it is not unusual not to see veins yet at 5 months. I use a 30g vermiculite/20g of water ratio in deli containers with no holes in the lid.

If you incubate with a diapause as follows: 45 days 70F/45 days at 60F/then remainder at 70-72F, they generally hatch around 6-7 months.

I have always candled eggs and never had problems with hatch rates. Carpets incubated properly generally hatch near 100%.

Thanks,

Kevin
Hi Kevin
Thank you very much for the information, I worked with carpets before with diapause and they hatched very quickly, and the vein could be seen in about 4 months, and it was why I asked when I observed no veins on my current clutch. I did room temperature for this cluth around 64-75F various from the past few months. I'll keep incubating them. Thanks again!
 
So what do you think is the main difference in time taken to hatch and do you have fairly set parameters you use for all your clutches to incubate?
Sorry for the time it took to respond! I did not notice your question till now!

I currently focus primarily on Panthers. I use the exact same parameters for all my locales. I also use the same parameters year round.

Observations: 1) Some locales hatch quicker and some take longer. 2) There can be a massive range between hstchdates from the same clutch laid. 3) Hatchlings that take longer to hatch are often stronger. 4) Incubation temperature or length of time of incubation does not seem to affect the sex of the hatchlings. 5) I never get tired of seeing and raising little babies! Lol
 

B.rice85

Member
I have 5 panther eggs that just started hatching today after 11 months. They didnt show any signs of development till about month 7-8. Have patience. As long as they dont collapse or grow mold just give them time. There were a few times in the past few months I was ready to write them off but now I'm glad I didnt.
 
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