Edema

Kaizen

Chameleon Enthusiast
Allright, so no one’s taking my bait for the Liz Lou, but lemme put a match to this pool of gas!
I’ve heard it a million times that montagnes, including the Jackson’s 3, are prone to edema, and when the sups are cut back, it goes away. I don’t (nor have I ever) keep any...but I will :p , so I’m ignorant joe here. Here’s a totally wild suggestion: I’ve heard it touted about that feeders need to be heated to make their gut contents available. Could the fact that the feeders that montagnes prey on are typically cold (montagne environment and all) plus your typical evolutionary considerations, have anything to do with their (the chams’) sensitivity to nutrients? Common @JacksJill, I know you want to weigh in here.
 

JacksJill

Chameleon Enthusiast
It is a metabolism issue. Higher altitudes = lower temperatures, a chameleon's metabolism is powered by the temperatures to which they are adapted. If you burn fats slower you use less so excess fat soluble vitamins are more easily over supplemented in montane species. That is why we see more puffy necks in higher altitude chameleons in captivity.
They are known to eat a variety of feeders the wild but lean toward flying insects - unheated or chilled but often pollinated.
It can take D3 2 months to be cleared from the body. Vitamin A can take 6 months.
 

Kaizen

Chameleon Enthusiast
Great answer! So what do you typically recommend as a supplement schedule. All of the all-in-ones have preformed A and d3, except Earth Pro A. Commercial gut loads always have an A and D additive, but homemade recipes don’t. A study has shown that pardalis don’t convert beta carotene to A, and so all vets learn that all chams need preformed A. What’s your recipe for gutloading, and which feeders; and how do you supplement?
 

Kaizen

Chameleon Enthusiast
Totally not trying to ask loaded questions; again, I know nothing about Montanes (yes I spelled it without a ‘g’ just for you) and want to learn.
 

JacksJill

Chameleon Enthusiast
I can only tell you what I do and that it has worked for me for several years for Jackson's. I dust very lightly you can barely see any dust on my feeders. I use a dollar store salt shaker to add the powder to my deli cup for more control. I use plain phos free calcium twice a week mixed with ground bee pollen. I use Repashy calcium plus LoD weekly in my growing and younger females and every other week in my males and full adults. I make my own gut load of a rotating variety of veggies and few fruits. I specifically don't double down with anymore Repashy gut load as that would be too much of a good thing.
The most unorthodox thing I do is feed everyone daily but half what I would if I fed every other day. If they leave any feeders I will skip a day.
 

Kaizen

Chameleon Enthusiast
Can I ask: r u blogging? Everyone would love to hear what works for you and why you think it works. Do you have a care sheet you’ve written?
 
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