Do Chameleons have the ability to show affection to their owners?

ijmccollum

New Member
There is a word for the more emotional contents of this thread: anthropomorphism.

Definition of ANTHROPOMORPHISM

: an interpretation of what is not human or personal in terms of human or personal characteristics : humanization

an·thro·po·mor·phist \-fist\ noun
I was wondering how long before that dirty little word would pop up!
Frankly I am quite the fan of Goodall and Grandin. Though I harbor no ideas on reptile emotion -- their brains really are quite different -- but there are some pretty good reads out there.

The emotional lives of animals - Bekoff
The souls of animals - Kowalski
When Elephants weep - Masson

-just to name a few.
 

jojackson

New Member
I was wondering how long before that dirty little word would pop up!
Frankly I am quite the fan of Goodall and Grandin. ...

Mammals/Reptiles, apples/oranges, but none the less, good point, nice contrast, and as I tend to say, there are exceptions to every rule!

Reminds me of the Jane Goodall cartoon by Gary Larson :D

I heard Janey later went a bit 'Howard Hughes' and refused to eat anything but banana's and was rejected from several aged care homes for swinging on light fixtures. :D :D :D
 

fluxlizard

Avid Member
story removed out of respect for the living.

Suffice it to say in her extreme viewpoint Jane Goodall is no fan at all of lizard keeping or lizard keepers.
 
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Elizadolots

New Member
Y'all know she's still alive right?

Not that this means she's not an offensive nutcase...but she's a living offensive nutcase. (assuming, of course, that she's an offensive nutcase....)
 

ijmccollum

New Member
They are both still alive and well. And both are very amazing women with some pretty amazing ideas -- take them or leave them, they remain icons in animal behavior and welfare.

And point taken without insult or injury, mammals do not equate reptiles.
 

DChalo

New Member
I am kinda proud of myself for posting such a popular thread. I guess its impossible to get in the head of reptiles and find out what they think of people.
 

kinyonga

Chameleon Enthusiast
The male platypus is one of the few mammals to produce venom. They have a pair of spurs on their hind limbs that contain a mixture of poisons that causes excruciating pain.
 

kinyonga

Chameleon Enthusiast
Since I remembered about the platypus poison, I wondered if there are other mammals that have poisons...so I looked it up. Slow lories, a couple of species of shrews and even one species of mole all have a venom! I learn something new every day!
 

dodolah

Retired Moderator
I see nothing wrong in applying some sense of human notion to our pet, as long as deep down you understand that it is more for your own benefit than the animal.

It's much more "interesting" and "rewarding" knowing that your chameleon recognized you as his owner rather than a moving tree or an insect source,
Although the second one might be a more accurate statement in scientific manner. I probably won't have any pet, if I lived in a world where the view of the animal's behavior is based solely on self preservation. Because with that view alone, having a pet will be irrational and burdensome.

But, having a balanced view on this is necessary, so that we do not delude ourselves to a point that can be harmful to our pet.
I remembered at one time or another, I got very frustrated trying to convince someone that her chameleons need to be separated from the small cage she kept them in.

She told me that her chameleons love each other that they 'play bite' and 'wrestle' everyday. When she separated those two, she claimed that her chameleons become inactive and looked sad all day long. So, she put them two chameleon back together so they can wrestle and play chase all day long :confused:.
 

jojackson

New Member
Dont forget our Eastern grey carnivorous Roos from Gippsland, Biggest in the world!
Here a large male delivers deadly cycto-toxin from spurs on its wrist after which it will hop a way a short distance and wait for its prey to stop moving, before moving in to feast with razor sharp teeth.
They feed in packs of up to 25, devouring sheep and even cattle till nothing remains!
Its recommend when bushwalking in Vic ,NOT to attempt to feed them bread!






:D
 
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