Cup or free range feeding?

wilsonlubeck

New Member
I was wondering which one was better. Some sites say cup feeding when they get older and a bunch of other stuff. What do you think? Is cup feeding better for worms? Do you hand feed?
 

Olimpia

Biologist & Ecologist
I think you can always do a combination of all 3 methods, which keeps things interesting for your chameleon. I would, for example, free feed the crickets (so he can practice hunting), cup feed roaches or things like that, and then hand feed a couple worms. Personally, I think mixing it up a little keeps your chameleon more busy and stimulated. And if you only cup feed it's been seen that chameleons get lazy and start having tongue laziness issues.
 

wilsonlubeck

New Member
Ok. So chameleons like a mix of everything. Handfeed worms right? I dont think i will be feeding roaches often.
 

Olimpia

Biologist & Ecologist
Or you can cupfeed worms, I was just giving an example. Like, you can put a couple worms in the cup one day and then the next day you give worms try to handfeed them instead, something like that if you want. I just like variety for them because it keeps their life more exciting, I think. But cup feeding worms is much easier for everyone that setting them free, so you can use whatever method you want acording to what you're feeding. Roaches and worms have a tendency to hide in the nearest dark place and just live there!
 

sandrachameleon

Chameleon Enthusiast
I agree - do both cup feeding and free-range.
I cup feed most roaches and crickets, and free-range some crickets, all stick bugs, terrestrial isopods, silkworms, superworms, butterworms, moths etc. If you use a large cup, its similar to free-range in that the chameleon has to work harder than with a small constraining cup. Using more than one cup (I have one fixed and one I move around) is also a benefit.

I think hand feeding is totally unnecessary, since it comes with risks and provides no benefit to the chameleon (only a sense of fun for the person).
 

pssh

Avid Member
You can just use a tub. A tub allows the bugs to run around so your lizard can hunt, but the bugs are contained.

Edit: stick bugs are illegal in the US unless they are a native species
 

Ace

Avid Member
i personally rather let them be natural hunters and free range the feeders....

though i sometimes handfeed for my own enjoyment, its true handfeeding has no real benefit,but it also has no negative either...unless your scared of holding bugs. and i seen no real stress from the cham if he feeds off your hand...initally if there stressed they will not eat. JMO
 

wilsonlubeck

New Member
Funny that you said that. I was just in san diego and found a place where they were in the bushes. Might be with pesticides. i shouldnt risk it
 

pssh

Avid Member
The animal may get too accustomed to handfeeding. Some chameleons won't eat any other way. There is always a negative if there is a positive.
 

Olimpia

Biologist & Ecologist
I have heard that if you're holding the insect between your fingers and you don't release in time you may strain their tongue. This sounds true enough. I only handfeed worms on an open palm, which I can't imagine having any more risk than eating off a plate, so I do it.
 

Ace

Avid Member
The animal may get too accustomed to handfeeding. Some chameleons won't eat any other way. There is always a negative if there is a positive.

but it is a reptile...if its hungry it will eat.
 

Ace

Avid Member
I have heard that if you're holding the insect between your fingers and you don't release in time you may strain their tongue. This sounds true enough. I only handfeed worms on an open palm, which I can't imagine having any more risk than eating off a plate, so I do it.
but chams tonguw should be strong enough. unless your grip was a massive hornworm...i dont see a real problem...if they have weak tongue projectile and retraction , then wont they have some illness to begin with?
 

Ace

Avid Member
so yes on phoenix worms
pheonx worms, superworms, hornworms, silkworms, butter worms, BB flies, stick bugs, mantids, some spiders, some butterflies(that are not toxic), moths, katydids, locusts, roaches, and the commanly used crickets:D
 

pssh

Avid Member
You can definitely strain their tongues. They are strong, but not stronger than your hand. It's like when you pull away when they bite. You can damage them.

The maggots are okay if your animal will eat them. Make sure they chew though or it might come out whole.
 
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