Chameleon scratches/scabs

Zdejong

New Member
My chameleon has scratched himself pretty good. It started to scab over but then he scratched the scab off when he grabbed his arm again. Should I bandage his scratch? If so what should I use? Right now I've been using an anti biotic ointment to help prevent infection but is that enough?
 

janjan20

Chameleon Enthusiast
Has the arm grabbing been an ongoing thing? I would continue with the ointment. Is it possible to send a pic?
 

MrsM

Avid Member
Has the arm grabbing been an ongoing thing? I would continue with the ointment. Is it possible to send a pic?
Good point- arm grabbing can be a sign of weakness, mbd, or injury when they are searching for stability.
You should look into the “why” and also do a full husbandry check with photos and the “how to ask for help” questions filled out.
It could mean adding different lighting, increasing proximity of vines, and nutrition concerns.
Silver wound ointment seems to help scabs. Antibiotic ointment is okay but I’m my experience the oiliness can make the area heat up so careful to only use on the spot you need it. I’ve heard of keepers using iodine. Wounds take a long time to heal on chameleons so consider the severity and if you need a vet. You may notice it turns dark, and the scab peels and repeats until it is smaller. The main goal is to keep it clean and prevent infection. Never pick the scab, if it is being kept clean it will fall off when ready.
Since I observed from the other posts you are syringe feeding it is helpful to think about where the vitamins come from and note that the carnivore care supplements those, but your goal is to get back on a regular diet asap.
 

MrsM

Avid Member
Can you fill out the information below and add some photos?

Chameleon Info:
  • Your Chameleon - The species, sex, and age of your chameleon. How long has it been in your care?
  • Handling - How often do you handle your chameleon?
  • Feeding - What are you feeding your cham? What amount? What is the schedule? How are you gut-loading your feeders?
  • Supplements - What brand and type of calcium and vitamin products are you dusting your feeders with and what is the schedule?
  • Watering - What kind of watering technique do you use? How often and how long to you mist? Do you see your chameleon drinking?
  • Fecal Description - Briefly note colors and consistency from recent droppings. Has this chameleon ever been tested for parasites?
  • History - Any previous information about your cham that might be useful to others when trying to help you.

Cage Info:
  • Cage Type - Describe your cage (Glass, Screen, Combo?) What are the dimensions?
  • Lighting - What brand, model, and types of lighting are you using? What is your daily lighting schedule?
  • Temperature - What temp range have you created (cage floor to basking spot)? Lowest overnight temp? How do you measure these temps?
  • Humidity - What are your humidity levels? How are you creating and maintaining these levels? What do you use to measure humidity?
  • Plants - Are you using live plants? If so, what kind?
  • Placement - Where is your cage located? Is it near any fans, air vents, or high traffic areas? At what height is the top of the cage relative to your room floor?
  • Location - Where are you geographically located?

Current Problem - The current problem you are concerned about.

--------------

Please Note:
  1. The more details you provide the better and more accurate help you will receive.
  2. Photos can be very helpful.
 

Zdejong

New Member
Pictures would be very helpful!
241113
20190727_144323.jpg
241114
20190727_144323.jpg
20190727_144257.jpg
 

Zdejong

New Member
Can you fill out the information below and add some photos?

Chameleon Info:
  • Your Chameleon - The species, sex, and age of your chameleon. How long has it been in your care?
  • Handling - How often do you handle your chameleon?
  • Feeding - What are you feeding your cham? What amount? What is the schedule? How are you gut-loading your feeders?
  • Supplements - What brand and type of calcium and vitamin products are you dusting your feeders with and what is the schedule?
  • Watering - What kind of watering technique do you use? How often and how long to you mist? Do you see your chameleon drinking?
  • Fecal Description - Briefly note colors and consistency from recent droppings. Has this chameleon ever been tested for parasites?
  • History - Any previous information about your cham that might be useful to others when trying to help you.

Cage Info:
  • Cage Type - Describe your cage (Glass, Screen, Combo?) What are the dimensions?
  • Lighting - What brand, model, and types of lighting are you using? What is your daily lighting schedule?
  • Temperature - What temp range have you created (cage floor to basking spot)? Lowest overnight temp? How do you measure these temps?
  • Humidity - What are your humidity levels? How are you creating and maintaining these levels? What do you use to measure humidity?
  • Plants - Are you using live plants? If so, what kind?
  • Placement - Where is your cage located? Is it near any fans, air vents, or high traffic areas? At what height is the top of the cage relative to your room floor?
  • Location - Where are you geographically located?

Current Problem - The current problem you are concerned about.

--------------

Please Note:
  1. The more details you provide the better and more accurate help you will receive.
  2. Photos can be very helpful.
Male veiled
4 years old(in my care from 6 months old)
Handling him daily as of now because of the past illness(respiratory infection and eye infection)
Food: horn worms, did meal worms recently and gutloaded with flukers(no longer using flukes or meal worms) recently wlswitching to liquid diet because he won't open mouth to eat anything.
Dusting with repti calcium daily, d3 2 a month but haven't been able to dust live food. Planning on mixing with liquid diet when supplies arrive.
I use a spray mister and a water droplet from top of cage(recently stopped water droplets bc he has been falling and I work a lot, don't want him lying in cold water or anything while I'm gone.)
He has barely been drinking unless I force him which hasn't been good.
I have not seen him poop in about a month. He was given multiple glucerna feeding and only ate 3 worms.
I just finished a round of antibiotics for his respiratory infection about 2 weeks ago. I have not tested him for parasites.
I do have a vet visit planned for Wednesday(strapped on cash until then)
Cage:
San Diego, California
Screen cage
48inch tall x 24inch x 24inch
Lighting is 40w daylight blue zoo med and a 50uvb 18inch T8
Ceramic heating lamp as well
Lights turn on at 6am and turn off at 5pm. Have 2 basking areas 1 close to the lights(can get to 115) another further down currently at 90. Lowest overnight temp is room temp so between 60-70
Humidity: just misting and location humidity.
No live plants
Cage is near a fan but fan is in opposite direction of chameleon.
High traffic area bc small apartment but only 2 ppl living here and there is lots of coverage for him. The top spot of the cage stands around 6 feet 3 inches. I'm 6ft6 and barely taller than cage.
The nets I have in the cage are bc he keeps falling and I don't want him to hit the bottom of cage too hard.
He started falling shortly after doing antibiotic injections and shortly after I started meal worms. I have pillows at the bottom of the cage for him to soften the fall as well.
241118
20190727_150416.jpg
 

Zdejong

New Member
Has the arm grabbing been an ongoing thing? I would continue with the ointment. Is it possible to send a pic?
The arm grabbing started a little over a month ago when I began antibiotics due to a respiratory infection. It was also the same time I was feeding him meal worms loaded with flukers.
 

Zdejong

New Member
Good point- arm grabbing can be a sign of weakness, mbd, or injury when they are searching for stability.
You should look into the “why” and also do a full husbandry check with photos and the “how to ask for help” questions filled out.
It could mean adding different lighting, increasing proximity of vines, and nutrition concerns.
Silver wound ointment seems to help scabs. Antibiotic ointment is okay but I’m my experience the oiliness can make the area heat up so careful to only use on the spot you need it. I’ve heard of keepers using iodine. Wounds take a long time to heal on chameleons so consider the severity and if you need a vet. You may notice it turns dark, and the scab peels and repeats until it is smaller. The main goal is to keep it clean and prevent infection. Never pick the scab, if it is being kept clean it will fall off when ready.
Since I observed from the other posts you are syringe feeding it is helpful to think about where the vitamins come from and note that the carnivore care supplements those, but your goal is to get back on a regular diet asap.
Ya I'm only doing the liquid feeding because I can get him to really eat otherwise. I want him to go back to a normal diet as soon as I can.
 

MrsM

Avid Member
Ok so it sounds like he really needs that vet visit due to the falling. He’s in a pretty critical place. Arm grabbing seems to be from the weakness. There is a chance that he could be developing mbd or has gone too long without food.
If you introduce a heavy diet all of a sudden or more medicine his kidneys could be at risk.
Feed the carnivore care with plenty of water because it is more immediate nutrition he has to absorb some nutrients ASAP.
You mak be able to sneak a bsfl in there if he laps or gulps as you get more adept with the syringe feeding.
If he gets stronger eventually you may get him to switch back to bugs by changing it to reptaboost which is an appetite stimulus.
You may need to just net in the top half of your enclosure or make a hospital bin for him if he is falling. Pillows could get moldy or hold bacteria.
Keep his temps on the warm side and when you mist him try doing so for longer times to see if that helps stimulate him to drink, but for now just make sure to look at his eyes and casque and ensure he is hydrated.

Can any more experienced keepers weigh in? I think a parasite test is needed but can parasites can be tested without poop samples?
 

janjan20

Chameleon Enthusiast
I think @MrsM gave some really good advice. He definitely needs to see a vet. I saw you cut out meal worms which is good because they are harder to digest. You will need a a poop sample to test for parasites. That may be hard if he’s not eating.
 

Zdejong

New Member
I have one scheduled for Wednesday. That's literally the soonest I can afford to get him in again. The pillows have remained dry so far but I will switch them out more often.
 

MrsM

Avid Member
I have one scheduled for Wednesday. That's literally the soonest I can afford to get him in again. The pillows have remained dry so far but I will switch them out more often.

Okay well please keep us updated on how the feedings go and what happens with the vet.
I am rooting for you. I really hope it helps.
 
Top Bottom