Can you tall me jackson chameleons breeding tip?

Parkjw

New Member
Currently, three of the four jackson chameleons in my family are male. One of the females gave birth in March, and the other two did not give birth when they came home.





The male is smaller than the females, is there any problem with the bridging?





If you have any tips for rainbow jackson chameleon breeding, I'd appreciate it.
 

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Chameleoking

Avid Member
When your Jackson’s chameleons (Chamaeleo jacksonii xantholophus) come of age, approximately nine months to one year old, place the female into the male’s enclosure for breeding. Allow the male to breed for three to five days. Watch for signs of disinterest, or aggression, such as the female rocking back and forth when approached by the male, hissing or biting. If this occurs, separate the animals for a week and try again.
 

Chameleoking

Avid Member
  • Some species, such as Jackson’s Chameleons, give live birth
  • Female Jackson’s Chameleons can retain sperm for longer than a year so they are able to produce babies even though they have not been with a male for a long time.
  • The babies are delicate, but designed to survive if you provide the correct conditions.
 

Parkjw

New Member
When your Jackson’s chameleons (Chamaeleo jacksonii xantholophus) come of age, approximately nine months to one year old, place the female into the male’s enclosure for breeding. Allow the male to breed for three to five days. Watch for signs of disinterest, or aggression, such as the female rocking back and forth when approached by the male, hissing or biting. If this occurs, separate the animals for a week and try again.
Thank you very much for your reply.

So you think it is so easy?
 

JacksJill

Moderator
Staff member
Do you have j. xanths or jacksonii jacksonii? The first picture looks like a xanth male the other two picks could be female jack jacks. It's hard to tell from the angle of your pictures and the wear and tear on their dorsal spines.
 

Mendez

Chameleon Enthusiast
@JacksJill, the first one looks like T. jacksonii jacksonii to me. I do agree that there is considerable wear and tear on the dorsal spines though. It's not xantholophus, but it also may not be the common jacksonii jacksonii that you are used to seeing. Could come from a slightly different region (??)--though most likely just wear and tear. It does have subtle coloration matching j.j with the light blue cheeks and a faint yellow stripe down the sides of the body. I'm no expert, just my opinion. But I will say that I have looked at way too many pics of all the T. jacksonii species/subspecies that I can distinguish the subspecies pretty well but at the cost of living a normal life... :ROFLMAO:
 

JacksJill

Moderator
Staff member
I'm not seeing the color on my laptop monitor that you describe and the spacing seems close. I would like to see more pictures. I wonder looking at the horns over the eyes if that isn't a female as well. Would really need to see the tail base from the side to have a good idea. I have two females with that coloration, (just looked on my phone). They look like toned down versions of my males.
 

leedragon

Chameleon Enthusiast
Do you have j. xanths or jacksonii jacksonii? The first picture looks like a xanth male the other two picks could be female jack jacks. It's hard to tell from the angle of your pictures and the wear and tear on their dorsal spines.
Really? I´d say it is 3 jackonii jacksonii females.
 

Chameleoking

Avid Member
Thank you very much for your reply.

So you think it is so easy?
I wish I could say it was easy. But its far from easy. But I believe it could be very exciting and fun if you have a lot of patience and skill. I'm not a breeder myself. Just read a lot and learn from the folks on here. I can say that you can count on the people on here to help you with all questions you have. You came to the right place for answers. Good luck with your breeding experience
 

Parkjw

New Member
Thank you for your reply.
It was Rainbow Jackson when I brought him but I feel different from many Rainbow Jackson and I'm so confused.

Second, third, Jackson seems to be right about Jackson, but first, it's weird haha.

I'll post some new photos later. I need you to check it out.
Do you have j. xanths or jacksonii jacksonii? The first picture looks like a xanth male the other two picks could be female jack jacks. It's hard to tell from the angle of your pictures and the wear and tear on their dorsal spines.
@JacksJill, the first one looks like T. jacksonii jacksonii to me. I do agree that there is considerable wear and tear on the dorsal spines though. It's not xantholophus, but it also may not be the common jacksonii jacksonii that you are used to seeing. Could come from a slightly different region (??)--though most likely just wear and tear. It does have subtle coloration matching j.j with the light blue cheeks and a faint yellow stripe down the sides of the body. I'm no expert, just my opinion. But I will say that I have looked at way too many pics of all the T. jacksonii species/subspecies that I can distinguish the subspecies pretty well but at the cost of living a normal life... :ROFLMAO:
 
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