Bright burst in color?

LoneBridger

Member
Started getting back on track with calcium to feeding. She’s displaying far more variety of color. Is this because of age? Diet? Agitation? Anything helps! I started giving calcium without D3 with her daily roach nymph. Every other day more than one. She eats a staple of crickets and worms with roaches in between. I hope this means she’s healthy
 

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AnamCara

Chameleon Enthusiast
She seems a little over weight-- when you say worms what kind? Wax and butter worms are high fat. Her color is absolutely beautiful and appears normal. For me, it is very hard to tell a receptive female panther but I have little to no experience with identifying receptivity. My girl at all times has flashed numerous colorations which seems to change with each shed.

She also appears to have a small edema in her neck area. My girl got edema twice-- once when she was gravid and once when I was supplementing too much d3.
 
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JacksJill

Chameleon Enthusiast
I was wondering about her neck also. She is either full of eggs and going to lay soon or is having another problem. Eggs put pressure on the kidneys as their kidneys are partially in the pelvic canal when they have a heavy load. I believe this why gravid females tend toward edema. Fat tend to deposit in the pelvic canal as well and makes it even more crowded.
 

LoneBridger

Member
Thanks for all the quick responses!! As for the worm I use superworms which is probably why she’s chubby. I have put in a bin of coco fiber but she hasn’t started to dig in it at all. How deep should the bin be? I’m using a small tubberware with it filled halfway so if she starts to dig it won’t overflow. I’ve been thinking about getting her fertilized once she’s a year old. Have a handsome Nosy Be in mind ;) she is of unknown local because I snatched her from a PetCo before she was mistreated. With these new colors I have no clue as to where her lineage lies
 

cloverthechameleon

Avid Member
Shes beautiful, panther females are so sweet. What supplements are you using and what is your exact schedule? She appears to habe abit of Gular Edema (neck puffyness, usualy from over supplementation). Usually easily curable.
 

AnamCara

Chameleon Enthusiast
Thanks for all the quick responses!! As for the worm I use superworms which is probably why she’s chubby. I have put in a bin of coco fiber but she hasn’t started to dig in it at all. How deep should the bin be? I’m using a small tubberware with it filled halfway so if she starts to dig it won’t overflow. I’ve been thinking about getting her fertilized once she’s a year old. Have a handsome Nosy Be in mind ;) she is of unknown local because I snatched her from a PetCo before she was mistreated. With these new colors I have no clue as to where her lineage lies
I would not breed unless you have a guarantee of selling -- and even less so if you are going to cross a nosy be with an unknown locale.

Tipperware will not be enough -- you'll need a large lay pot. Mix it with play sand so that it holds a tunnel. Please view the attached video.
Some keepers may disagree -- but it appears female dig until they reach something hard to lay against -- like a rock or a root ball. If you got a plant you can use an extra-large pot and plant the root ball -- or some keepers place a rock a few inched below the substrate.
 

LoneBridger

Member
Sounds perfectly do-able, if she seems egg ready I’ll mix this up quick. Any reasons not to breed? Her lifespan is quite short and I’d like to keep one of her sons I think it’d be a beautiful clutch
 

AnamCara

Chameleon Enthusiast
Sounds perfectly do-able, if she seems egg ready I’ll mix this up quick. Any reasons not to breed? Her lifespan is quite short and I’d like to keep one of her sons I think it’d be a beautiful clutch
I would keep the lay bin as a permanent part of her bin. Some chameleons are very picky/sensitive about their home. If you add something unfamiliar when she needs to lay -- she may not do it.

Breeding is very expensive and unless you are doing it on a large scale is not really profitable. There are lots of people breeding so that saturates the market as well. The feeders alone are a pain (i hear) -- baby chameleons eat A TON. Fruit flies -- pinheads. You'll likely need to culture them yourself.

When purchasing from breeders -- most people want to know a locale. Nosy Be's are such beautiful local's and I, personally, would not want to cross that with an unknown local I could not speak about to potential buyers.
 

KobaOregonherper

Chameleon Enthusiast
Hmm you may have talked me out of it, any guesses to local? I’m stumped. She looked like rainbow sherbet today when she normally is a light peppermint
Honestly could be anything. Could be a hybrid for all we know. She looks ambilobe or ambanja, but could be nosy mitsio or sambava. Hard to tell.
 

janjan20

Chameleon Enthusiast
I was looking through one of your recent threads and you mentioned you were working on a a bio active set up. Any chance that’s near completion? I know some keepers use that as a more natural lay bin.
 

LoneBridger

Member
I was looking through one of your recent threads and you mentioned you were working on a a bio active set up. Any chance that’s near completion? I know some keepers use that as a more natural lay bin.
my Bioactive enclosure still has to be welded. Then my plans are for a real naturalistic look with expanding foam and silicone with coco husk and cork halves. It’s gonna take a couple months and she will have that time to grow. I will have upgraded my way of containing the water as the water heater has a drain on the very bottom. I will layer clay balls used for gardening in the bottom then I’ll add a mesh between for drainage. Add the mixed substrate with good microbes, add isopods and springtails. Then add various moss and live plants. I hope to have it finished and complete by November
 

AnamCara

Chameleon Enthusiast
She looks full grown and increased eating still increase egg production, so the lay bin needs to be done asap. Especially if she is flashing you new colors!
 
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