Are we doing something wrong?

Chantal

New Member
Oh dear! Your phone needs to be recharged! ;)
All I can find on that plant is, “Callisia repens is also called Turtle Vine because it is often used to feed turtles and other reptiles”. While it may be safe and fine, I can’t say.
Well, she ate so many already, I guess it’s harmless ?. I also prefer her eating this one and not the philondendron, in that quantity.
 

Rhea’s mum

Established Member
I know my girl would eat all day if she could.
Don’t worry about feeling bad I had that feeling when I realised it was time to cut back but it is for their health. Plus if you fill up her enclosure with more edible plants then if she does get hungry she can munch on those.
One thing I would say with the plants, knowing she is a plant muncher, pay a bit extra for established plants. That way if she goes to town on them then they will still survive.
 

Beman

Chameleon Enthusiast
So there is a fine line between too much food and too little. We find the line. Veileds will literally eat all day long if they are given the opportunity. This is why many are obese. Because owners do not know the difference between too much and too little. They treat them like a dog or a cat that they feed treats to and give regular every day feedings... But they are reptiles and they need to be lean and muscular. A fat cham leads to compromised organ function. With females you have the added risk of egg laying. But males and females both have to have a restricted varied diet. Without this they have extremely short unhealthy lives.

As humans we place our emotions on our animals. We think omg they must be starving... But it just is not the case. Veileds eat and eat because it is built into them that they do not know when their next meal will come. In the wild they have to eat as much as possible because they don't know when the next opportunity will arise. In captivity this drive to eat still occurs. They do not know that we will take care of them and ensure they eat. They only know instinctively to eat.

You can do things to limit your worried feelings... Once my babies hit 5-6 months old and I have started reducing feeders they are switched over from feeder runs to cup feeding. I hold the cup for them to eat and then the cup is put up. This makes it so they are not staring at a feeder run and making me feel like an awful cham parent but it also maintains the bond. They know when they see the cup that I am bringing food. Even my male that does not tolerate me at all comes to me when he sees the cup. This gives me the opportunity to look him over up close and ensure that he is healthy.

So while your instinct is to still give food. Don't it is still protein and fat no matter the size. Keep her on a schedule. It really is best for her.
 

Chantal

New Member
So there is a fine line between too much food and too little. We find the line. Veileds will literally eat all day long if they are given the opportunity. This is why many are obese. Because owners do not know the difference between too much and too little. They treat them like a dog or a cat that they feed treats to and give regular every day feedings... But they are reptiles and they need to be lean and muscular. A fat cham leads to compromised organ function. With females you have the added risk of egg laying. But males and females both have to have a restricted varied diet. Without this they have extremely short unhealthy lives.

As humans we place our emotions on our animals. We think omg they must be starving... But it just is not the case. Veileds eat and eat because it is built into them that they do not know when their next meal will come. In the wild they have to eat as much as possible because they don't know when the next opportunity will arise. In captivity this drive to eat still occurs. They do not know that we will take care of them and ensure they eat. They only know instinctively to eat.

You can do things to limit your worried feelings... Once my babies hit 5-6 months old and I have started reducing feeders they are switched over from feeder runs to cup feeding. I hold the cup for them to eat and then the cup is put up. This makes it so they are not staring at a feeder run and making me feel like an awful cham parent but it also maintains the bond. They know when they see the cup that I am bringing food. Even my male that does not tolerate me at all comes to me when he sees the cup. This gives me the opportunity to look him over up close and ensure that he is healthy.

So while your instinct is to still give food. Don't it is still protein and fat no matter the size. Keep her on a schedule. It really is best for her.
Yes, I understand. Bringing harm to her health is not what I want. We will for sure reduce the food. The quantity was not my only concern in this. It’s also the fact to sit around all day having nothing to do, no movements or possible prey...sounds maybe silly, but in nature she would have movements everywhere, even if she would’t catch something during the day, it’s still more exiting. But I totally get the point! Thanks for the feedback!
We don’t feed in a cup, thought a bit of exercise doesn’t harm. Silkworms however she spots from a long distance, she almost runs to them when we hold them in a pincet.
 

MissSkittles

Chameleon Enthusiast
Yes, I understand. Bringing harm to her health is not what I want. We will for sure reduce the food. The quantity was not my only concern in this. It’s also the fact to sit around all day having nothing to do, no movements or possible prey...sounds maybe silly, but in nature she would have movements everywhere, even if she would’t catch something during the day, it’s still more exiting. But I totally get the point! Thanks for the feedback!
We don’t feed in a cup, thought a bit of exercise doesn’t harm. Silkworms however she spots from a long distance, she almost runs to them when we hold them in a pincet.
I don’t know if you can get bsfl (black soldier fly larvae) where you are. Here they are also called calci worms & Phoenix worms. As a larvae, they are good to add to your staple feeders. If you let them pupate into flies, your cham will have some fun flying snacks.
 

Chantal

New Member
I don’t know if you can get bsfl (black soldier fly larvae) where you are. Here they are also called calci worms & Phoenix worms. As a larvae, they are good to add to your staple feeders. If you let them pupate into flies, your cham will have some fun flying snacks.
That’s a nice idea, yes, we can get them, quite smal larves, right? Exercise & excitement ?
 

Beman

Chameleon Enthusiast
Yes, I understand. Bringing harm to her health is not what I want. We will for sure reduce the food. The quantity was not my only concern in this. It’s also the fact to sit around all day having nothing to do, no movements or possible prey...sounds maybe silly, but in nature she would have movements everywhere, even if she would’t catch something during the day, it’s still more exiting. But I totally get the point! Thanks for the feedback!
We don’t feed in a cup, thought a bit of exercise doesn’t harm. Silkworms however she spots from a long distance, she almost runs to them when we hold them in a pincet.
In the wild they do the same though. They move into the sun to warm themselves then retreat into the trees to cool down and sleep. It's not like they are traveling huge areas. Even in outdoor enclosures they do the same... opportunistic eaters grabbing what comes near them. You can provide more exercise by doing a larger enclosure add a few black soldier flies here and there... But even then with larger enclosures they pick their spots move around a bit when desired but that's about it lol.
 

MissSkittles

Chameleon Enthusiast
You could always set up a free range area for her to give her a little time out of the enclosure...maybe in front of a window so she has a view of the world outside.
 

Chantal

New Member
You could always set up a free range area for her to give her a little time out of the enclosure...maybe in front of a window so she has a view of the world outside.
We had left the cage door open a couple of times, she didn’t come out or even come near the door. We also have 2 cats, so need to watch out. Although she is very curious when they walk around near her cage, she comes to the front and watches them.
Do you have a free range area for your cham?
 

MissSkittles

Chameleon Enthusiast
We had left the cage door open a couple of times, she didn’t come out or even come near the door. We also have 2 cats, so need to watch out. Although she is very curious when they walk around near her cage, she comes to the front and watches them.
Do you have a free range area for your cham?
No, unfortunately I currently have 4 cats and a dog that I have no trust that they won’t eat my reptiles. Hopefully soon 2 of the cats will move out with their human and I’ll have a dedicated reptile room, where I can set up a nice free range for them.
 

Chantal

New Member
Laybin...

Please post a couple of photos so I can see all of her from the side.
This are the best photos I have right now, she’s sleeping already, it’s 20:40 here in NL.
 

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kinyonga

Chameleon Enthusiast
Females often eat dirt/soil/sand when hey are producing eggs...BTW
They will destroy plants by eating all the leaves as well.
 
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