Sharing my new enclosure!

Sonny13

Chameleon Enthusiast
Depends on which Jackson’s type, they can grow up to a female veiled size. Jackson’s are also more active then veiled’s and they roam through their whole enclosure, that’s why they need that extra space. However don’t shoot me if I’m wrong about this, @JacksJill @Mendez @Kaizen are our Jackson’s expert.
I think you can house a juvenile Jackson till about 1 year in that size enclosure, then you need to go bigger, towards the suggested size.
 

JamesEB

Member
Depends on which Jackson’s type, they can grow up to a female veiled size. Jackson’s are also more active then veiled’s and they roam through their whole enclosure, that’s why they need that extra space. However don’t shoot me if I’m wrong about this, @JacksJill @Mendez @Kaizen are our Jackson’s expert.
I think you can house a juvenile Jackson till about 1 year in that size enclosure, then you need to go bigger, towards the suggested size.
See that would make a lot more sense. So Yellow-crested Jackson's Chameleons get to 12-18 inches, and Dwarf Jackson's Chameleon are the ones that stay under 12inches?
 

JamesEB

Member
I did some research, and I've pieced it together. The Yellow-Crested Jackson's Chameleon (Trioceros jacksonii xantholophus) are more common and get much larger than the other two subspecies (Machakos Hills and Dwarf Jackson's Chameleon).

Yellow-crested exceeds 16" while the other too only reach 6 - 10"; the 4ft enclosure makes more sense when Yellow-crested is the standard pet trade subspecies.
 

Lindasjackson

Chameleon Enthusiast
Not always true, not all xanthalophus get to 16 inches. It’s just the size of the enclosure they need. They are very territorial and in the wild they patrol large areas of A tree or trees where they live and consider their territory.
 

Kaizen

Chameleon Enthusiast
So, I’ll just add my 2 cents here: Both the nominate subspecies and the xantholophus can be large, and should have an enclosure of 15 cubic feet or more. The mount meru subspecies is small and can be kept in a smaller enclosure. I assume you can do any numeric conversions, but for TJJ or TJX, 15 cubic feet would be the minimum in my opinion.
Since you’re using glass, think hard about using a basking bulb for jax.
 

JamesEB

Member
So, I’ll just add my 2 cents here: Both the nominate subspecies and the xantholophus can be large, and should have an enclosure of 15 cubic feet or more. The mount meru subspecies is small and can be kept in a smaller enclosure. I assume you can do any numeric conversions, but for TJJ or TJX, 15 cubic feet would be the minimum in my opinion.
Since you’re using glass, think hard about using a basking bulb for jax.
Hello

Upgrading down the road isn't an issue. I enjoy building bio-active terrariums. Who knows, I might try replicating Sonny13's build.

I invested in a dimming switch for my basking bulb (set
80-85°F /26-29°C ) and a MistKing. This there anything I'm missing?
 

Kaizen

Chameleon Enthusiast
Hello

Upgrading down the road isn't an issue. I enjoy building bio-active terrariums. Who knows, I might try replicating Sonny13's build.

I invested in a dimming switch for my basking bulb (set
80-85°F /26-29°C ) and a MistKing. This there anything I'm missing?
I don’t use basking bulbs with any of my jax. With a glass enclosure, a t5 uvb and an additional t5 6400k, your jax will get plenty of warmth up top.
 

JamesEB

Member
I don’t use basking bulbs with any of my jax. With a glass enclosure, a t5 uvb and an additional t5 6400k, your jax will get plenty of warmth up top.
I live in the UK; it can get pretty cold here. It's summer, and The ambient temperature in my home is only 19°C.
 

Sonny13

Chameleon Enthusiast
I don’t use basking bulbs with any of my jax. With a glass enclosure, a t5 uvb and an additional t5 6400k, your jax will get plenty of warmth up top.
I’m doing the same with my 2 montane species. Only an Arcadia T5 uvb kit and Jungle dawn led bar, and my basement is cold and the top part is screen, glass would hold up the heat even better. I know there‘re more members doing this the same way, no basking bulb.
 

Sonny13

Chameleon Enthusiast
I live in the UK; it can get pretty cold here. It's summer, and The ambient temperature in my home is only 19°C.
19 is perfect. In Germany some people are keeping them outside at the moment with nighttemps 14 and daytime temps max 24. If you have Instagram, check TerraKultur
 

JamesEB

Member
19 is perfect. In Germany some people are keeping them outside at the moment with nighttemps 14 and daytime temps max 24. If you have Instagram, check TerraKultur
I appreciate the input. I'm sure there will be days where I don't need the basking bulb but better safe than sorry. It's why I bought a dimming switch.
 

Sonny13

Chameleon Enthusiast
I appreciate the input. I'm sure there will be days where I don't need the basking bulb but better safe than sorry. It's why I bought a dimming switch.
Of course, it‘s just experimenting till you get the right temps. Another option would be an extra time switch on the basking bulb and only turn it on for the first 3 hours or something and then turn it off the rest of the day. That‘s what I’m doing with my veiled at the moment, in her free range setting. Now during the summer I can’t leave it on all day, then around noon I spot her with her mouth open. Tried a lower wattage and that wasn’t enough heat, it won’t activate her. It‘s constantly observing, anticipating and adapting, however that makes this a hobby 😎
 

JamesEB

Member
Of course, it‘s just experimenting till you get the right temps. Another option would be an extra time switch on the basking bulb and only turn it on for the first 3 hours or something and then turn it off the rest of the day. That‘s what I’m doing with my veiled at the moment, in her free range setting. Now during the summer I can’t leave it on all day, then around noon I spot her with her mouth open. Tried a lower wattage and that wasn’t enough heat, it won’t activate her. It‘s constantly observing, anticipating and adapting, however that makes this a hobby 😎
Thank you for the advice; the extra time switch is a great idea. It would give me more control. I also couldn't agree more on, observe, anticipate and adapt. It's a good motto I like it :)

I've been in contact with a jackson's breeder near me. If all goes well, I will be the proud owner of a xantholophus juvenile by early next month.
 

Sonny13

Chameleon Enthusiast
Thank you for the advice; the extra time switch is a great idea. It would give me more control. I also couldn't agree more on, observe, anticipate and adapt. It's a good motto I like it :)

I've been in contact with a jackson's breeder near me. If all goes well, I will be the proud owner of a xantholophus juvenile by early next month.
Awesome….got mine last Wednesday, and they‘re sooo amazing and gently. Hopefully we can congratulate you soon 🤞🏻
 

JamesEB

Member
Awesome….got mine last Wednesday, and they‘re sooo amazing and gently. Hopefully we can congratulate you soon 🤞🏻
I was sent photos of the parents; the pair are unrelated. The male is 4/5 years, and the female is 3 years old import from a breeder; she was originally captive farm-bred.
 

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