Chameleon Color Change

MissSkittles

Chameleon Enthusiast
I agree. Looks like you have a sweet little girl. 🤗 Having correct husbandry is more important than ever in order to prevent problems with egg laying. Yes, she will lay eggs whether she has even seen a male. Usually around 6 months old is when they start showing all of their pretty colors and get restless…their receptive phase. A few weeks + after is when the egg laying starts. She’ll be needing a lay bin. As it shortens their lives, we try to limit the number of eggs produced and frequency of laying the diet and temperatures. No need to worry about this just yet. We want her to get all of her nutrition needed to grow into a healthy beautiful young lady cham. I could go on and on about this, but think I’ve overwhelmed you enough for one day.o_O
 

Andrew1283

Established Member
Mine is almost a year and hasn’t laid eggs. They’re all different but it’s better to be prepared! Mine does well in a screened XL Reptibreeze with hanging pothos and a black bucket of play sand in the bottom. And I use a pedialyte bottle as my dripper. Veieled are very hardy and don’t need the higher humidity that some other chams do. People say they can be nasty but mine is a sweet heart. Treat them right while they’re young and you have a better chance of bonding. Never grab them to hold them. Let them walk onto you if they want. They come to you some days and others they don’t want anything to do with you lol :)
 
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ERKleRose

Chameleon Enthusiast
Since she is female, you'll want to keep her basking temps between 78-80*F. Make sure to use a digital thermometer or digital thermometer/hygrometer combo with a probe for basking temps, with the probe placed where the top of her back is when she's on her basking branch. Here's a great chart for lay bins, too! Let me know if you want any links!
 

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Klyde O'Scope

Chameleon Enthusiast
Dry ice is just carbon dioxide, which is heavier than air. Therefore any expelled CO2 gas from dry ice would just sink. For purposes of proving a chimney effect you need something that closely resembles the density and temperature of the surrounding room air, like a light smoke. It’s still denser than room air, since it contains particulate matter but that’s my best idea.
Right. No particulates or residue. Placed inside I would agree. Placed outside as I mentioned, the draw should still work; they use dry ice to test the draw of fume hoods.
Air is drawn around the baffles and up the duct like a chimney. ... You can test air flow performance with a dry ice bath that generates a visible vapor, or contact EH&S to perform a hood visualization test.
https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=&cad=rja&uact=8&ved=2ahUKEwiN_77K0r3xAhVHHs0KHRC2Cc0QFjABegQIAxAD&url=https://ehs.colorado.edu/wp-content/uploads/2014/11/Fume-Hood-QandA.pdf&usg=AOvVaw3SpkMdAZ6tY9RiC8xgeAF5
 

Andrew1283

Established Member
Right. No particulates or residue. Placed inside I would agree. Placed outside as I mentioned, the draw should still work; they use dry ice to test the draw of fume hoods.
You need to use something that gets some good hang time when we are talking about this little of a chimney effect without much suction at all. When I have seen dry ice at Halloween parties it seems to fall pretty fast. I don’t know how strong the chimney effect would be in an enclosure when a female veiled’s basking is kept at 78-80 in a 72 degree room. It certainly wouldn’t be as strong as the chimney effect in an enclosed attic which can exceed 120 degrees in summer or a real chimney with a fire roaring! I have reviewed a bunch of engineering reports on the subject for work. The attorneys always find ways to pick them apart no matter what.
 

Klyde O'Scope

Chameleon Enthusiast
You need to use something that gets some good hang time when we are talking about this little of a chimney effect without much suction at all. When I have seen dry ice at Halloween parties it seems to fall pretty fast. I don’t know how strong the chimney effect would be in an enclosure when a female veiled’s basking is kept at 78-80 in a 72 degree room. It certainly wouldn’t be as strong as the chimney effect in an enclosed attic which can exceed 120 degrees in summer or a real chimney with a fire roaring! I have reviewed a bunch of engineering reports on the subject for work. The attorneys always find ways to pick them apart no matter what.
I'm not an attorney, but I've been utilizing chimney effects since 1976, and make use of it in both of my reptile enclosures. One (solid top) needs a little help via a muffin fan; the other (screen top) doesn't. We don't need air changes measured in minutes for a reptile enclosure—that'd be quite breezy and suck a lot of the heat & humidity right out. As long as there's a screened top and a few square inches of intake vent, very little can & will get the job done. ;)
 

FlamingTundra64

New Member
Looks like a female veieled to me. Definitely watch the temp in that enclosure. My female veiled suffered burns on her back because I had a halogen lamp way too close to her basking branch. These forums helped me to get the temperature just right and I’m glad to say she made a full recovery. It doesn’t take long!

if she’s green in your hand that’s really sweet but that also means something is wrong with her enclosure. She doesn’t feel comfortable in it and that could be because it’s a new environment. They can turn dark when stressed but they also turn dark to absorb more heat when they want to raise their temp. When I changed my girl’s enclosure she was very dark and didn’t eat for three days. Don’t handle her any more than you have to but build trust with hand feeding. Eventually she will crawl onto you during feedings and that’s really fun. Just put her back in the enclosure when she’s done eating so she thinks of being with you as nothing but a positive experience. Make sure to follow the posted advice on feeding with supplements and keep that temp in check. She is beautiful by the way!
Thank you!
 

MissSkittles

Chameleon Enthusiast
I got her a screen cage today. There are alot more things needing to be done, but she has plenty of room and air flow now!
I’ve found my chameleon enclosures are always a work in process. I got the basics down and then it took me some time to replace all of the fake plants with real. Then I tried bioactive. Now I’m currently working on what I say now will be the last time I upgrade everything, but I don’t believe myself.
Just make sure you get your lights and supplements sorted as those are super important. :)
 
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