Yay baby Jacksons :)

coldsweat97527

New Member
As i was at work the other night and my girlfriend called to tell me that our female jackson was havin babys :) i was so excited and almost off work. by the time i got home there were 9 of em only 4 of em looked alive but the others came around shortly after :) we lost one the next day but the other 8 are still fine and eating FF's setup with a light and basking spot :)

PS. forgot to mention that this is my first batch of babys.. i was expecting them and have done tons of research but am in need of small stuff. mainly. dusting pinhead crickets and FF'S? and some people say basking spot ans some people are sayin that a cage around 76 is good?

any input on those questions would be great :)
 

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lindseymeder16

New Member
Oh my gosh that is freakin cool. my friend had bought a wild caught jackson's and it had babies unexpectedly a month after he got it. That how I learned all about chameleons, and fell in love with them. I ended up getting a baby but unfortunately he passed shortly after I got him :( he was the runt.
 

coldsweat97527

New Member
aww :( we have a runt too lol he is soooo cute :)

Oh my gosh that is freakin cool. my friend had bought a wild caught jackson's and it had babies unexpectedly a month after he got it. That how I learned all about chameleons, and fell in love with them. I ended up getting a baby but unfortunately he passed shortly after I got him :( he was the runt.
 

stevie

New Member
hello there , i have bred them this year (second generation ) and still breeding them , last litter i had 30 young and only 2 of them didnt make it .
i always youse a basking light of 75 watt , they are kept simmillar as the parents ,keeping in mind not tho go to extreme (to hot or to cold) mist them 3times every day and feed them massive amount of everithing that fits in there mouths
greets
 

Cainschams

New Member
hello there , i have bred them this year (second generation ) and still breeding them , last litter i had 30 young and only 2 of them didnt make it .
i always youse a basking light of 75 watt , they are kept simmillar as the parents ,keeping in mind not tho go to extreme (to hot or to cold) mist them 3times every day and feed them massive amount of everithing that fits in there mouths
greets
I have not bred them but my first cham was a very young jacksonii. I agree with giving them a basking site also along with any other youngsters from any species. Why it is so many times thrown around here that babies cannot thermoregulate and that they dont need a basking site, I dont know:confused: They too are chameleons and chameleons need to have the chance to thermoregulate along with the basking bulbs providing UVA which helps simulate appetite.

As Stevie said, keep in mind not to go to the extremes. Also keep in mind what you are housing them in because heat can quickly build up in plastic bins, exo terras and even regular screen cages. Use the wattage appropriate for your type of enclosure and room temps. Just be very careful not to cook them.

Congrats!!!! Baby jacksonii are so freaking cool:D
 

stevie

New Member
jep give them a basking site , you'l see they are gonna youse it , so far i've bred with multituberculata ,deremensis ,jacksoni ,hoehnelli and soon hopefully rudis and they al had basking site's
 

JoeG

New Member
Congrats on your babies! I have read they do best in a screen enclosure for better air circulation. They also need high humidity so if you can keep the humidity up in the room they are in, this has been working for me. Mine are 1 month old & are doing really well. Lots of fruitflies at first & they just started eating 1/8 inch crix. I'm sure they will thrive for you. They're cool to watch , Enjoy them....
 

Chris Jury

New Member
I have not bred them but my first cham was a very young jacksonii. I agree with giving them a basking site also along with any other youngsters from any species. Why it is so many times thrown around here that babies cannot thermoregulate and that they dont need a basking site, I dont know:confused: They too are chameleons and chameleons need to have the chance to thermoregulate along with the basking bulbs providing UVA which helps simulate appetite.
Ditto. I keep seeing this business about not providing basking sites, or only providing basking areas that get to comparatively very low temps (e.g., 80 F) and find it utterly bizarre. There's only data on preferred body temperatures for a handful of chameleon species in the literature, but from a fairly diverse (phylogenetically, ecologically, and in terms of habitat/range) subsample of species including several Triceros spp., several Chamaeleo spp., Bradypodion pumilium and Furcifer pardalis. All of these species actively thermoregulate and tend to maintain body temperatures in the neighborhood of the mid to upper 80's F most of the time, given the opportunity. Species that live in lowland areas where ambient temps can easily reach the 90's F do this, and montane species found at very high elevations (e.g., T. schubotzi) that see daytime highs in the 60's and 70's F do this. Different species definitely have different niches, but it seems like temperature preferences may not be much of a factor in this niche partitioning. Instead rainfall, habitat type, competition, etc. seem like much more important factors than temperature.

Personally, I would give any species access to ambient temps in the 70's F in the coolest part of their enclosure (during the day) as well as a basking site that hits at least 90 F. This will allow them to thermoregulate as they need. As above, the idea that neonates can't thermoregulate is, to me, utterly bizarre. I mean, how do people think these (or any reptiles) live in nature? If neonates weren't able to thermoregulate effectively, they wouldn't last long.

cj
 

sdheli420

Established Member
ive had about 6 different batches of jacksons..all came out great!..i always "help" the lil ones get out of the sack, by purposfully "dropping" them from hand to hand..about 6 inches, some need that to start moving, make sure you keep a good humidity goin, dont let it get too cold nor too hot i never went under 70 ant night, and nothing above 80 in the day..i kept my hum at about 70 percent..keep the light a good distance from the screen lf using a screen cage(i have seem people leave the light right on the top and the chams climbing everywhere, ie..on the ceiling..they will burn their tiny lil feet and wont walk and die..its extremly dis-heartning to see!!).. i suggest gut loading your crickets, rather than the shake n bake method (this will cause debate, but ive always had VERY healthy babies..just my way of dooin it)..but congrats, and good luck with yer new lil buddies!!
 

javsto

New Member
are they always born black & white and at what age do the horns start to grow? Are you thinking about selling any of them?
 

jdog1027

Established Member
are they always born black & white and at what age do the horns start to grow? Are you thinking about selling any of them?
I have a couple that were born 12/16/2010, which puts them at about 11weeks old, and 2 of mine have already started to sprout their horns. They actually had them somewhat when they were first born, enough that i was able to guess that I had 2 males/ 1 female. Their color hasn't really changed much, however, they do sometimes get a hint of green on their lips, around each horn and on their feet.
This was 12/17/2010

This is current
 
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