What would you put in a first aid kit for chameleons?

jasimmons86

New Member
Instead of just going straight to the vet, what if a person had afirst I'd kit thT could be their when something goes wrong.
What would you think needs to be in that kit?
What would you want in that kit?
 

ferretinmyshoes

Veterinarian
Staff member
Maybe lube for rectal or hemipene prolapse. Aside from that...not much because problems arise slowly from poor husbandry and are metabolic imbalances. They're just not something you can fix yourself and prevention is far better than anything you can do. First aid kits are really only useful for trauma. So maybe some antibacterial ointment for burns. Someone correct me if you can think of something else that would be useful...
 

kinyonga

Chameleon Enthusiast
Cat catheters (they work well on the end of a syringe to flush out wounds), cotton balls, flamazine cream, K-Y jelly, betadine, Q-tips, latex gloves, liquid calcium, syringes (with and without needles), spatula for opening mouths, I don't know what the right name for it is, but I call it bird tape...sticks to itself but not the lizard...sure I've missed a few things that I could add if I actually went and looked at my kit!
 

jannb

Chameleon Enthusiast
Zymox, Salvadene, Gentamicin, Terramycin, Liquid calcium, Pedialyte, KY Jelly, Syringes (several sizes) with and without needles, Mineral oil, Cod Liver Oil, Q-tips, Plastic eye dropper, and tweezers.
 
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Syn

Avid Member
Zymox, Salvadene, Gentamicin, Terramycin, Liquid calcium, Pedialyte, Syringes (several sizes) with and without needles, Mineral oil, Cod Liver Oil, Q-tips, Plastic eye dropper, and tweezers.
Can you get all of that without a vet? Like the Silvadene?
 

Syn

Avid Member
I don't really know because I work closely with my vet. You could try Google and see if it gives you a place to buy it.
Just not sure I like the idea of getting any sort of medication without talking to a vet first, getting the wrong percent and what not. :/
 

krknieriem

New Member
Im sure all of this would save alot of money in vet bills but if you have the experience level to have to ask this question Im sure it would be better off to take your cham to the vet because I know I would not know when and how to administer such remedies. I would be affraid to hurt him further
 

jasimmons86

New Member
That some good stuff to keep, but im not sure i would be willing to stick my cham with a needle, or give him anything that requires specific dosage unless i knew what i was doing.
I appreciate all the answers
thank you

my chameleon isn't sick or anything, i was just curious what are some of the things that you needed and didn't have that you wish you would have kept on hand.
 

ataraxia

Avid Member
my first aid shoe box.. reptaid, polysporin, providone iodine, plain pedialyte (refridge after opening), 1.0 ml syringe, bottle water, small jar for mixing, liquid calcium, flagyl, panacur, digital gram scale and saline.
 
my cage is all over the place :(

So I'm thinkin' to myself " I have a Panther from a reputable breeder, doing everything she says, my guy looks good. I read all I could before I bought him, I'm in here learning away.....and I can't be more off. I'm so glad I figured it out now (and its basic temps/ humidity)
my thermo read 72, thought he was cold. Jumped up my humidity, blah, blah, blah
Well my basking lamp @ 9in away was a shopping 120' :( I'm killing my lovey with kindness.
I should know better, I've raised like everything and well. But this?
got him to the vet today, new lower watt basking bulb.
Hopefully he will forgive me
K, I'm done ranting and beating myself up
It all started when he stopped pooping
 

kinyonga

Chameleon Enthusiast
I didn't answer this part...
jasimmons86 said..."Instead of just going straight to the vet, what if a person had afirst I'd kit thT could be their when something goes wrong."...the things I have in my kit are things that I might need for minor injuries/issues or to use to help in treatment after the chameleon has been seen by a vet or for such things as MBD (rescues) that don't need a vet's diagnosis. I have kept panacur/fenbendazole but never used it unless the vet gave me the ok. Things like antibiotics, I don't keep because unless a culture and sensitivity test is done one doesn't know which antibiotic will kill the bacteria involved or even what the bacteria is. Also, most of the antibiotics have a short shelf life. If there is a case where an antibiotic is likely to be needed, I take the chameleon to the vet.
 

panthercham

New Member
my first aid shoe box.. reptaid, polysporin, providone iodine, plain pedialyte (refridge after opening), 1.0 ml syringe, bottle water, small jar for mixing, liquid calcium, flagyl, panacur, digital gram scale and saline.
I like this....I would also add a heat pack for any cold weather travel to the vet or in times of a power outage and the other thing I would add is a small jar with $300 - $400 cash in to cover any vet bills for those emergencies because a cham always times it to needs a vet visit 3 days away from pay day or an empty bank account!
 
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ataraxia

Avid Member
I like this....I would also add a heat pack for any cold weather travel to the vet or in times of a power outage and the other thing I would add is a small jar with $300 - $400 cash in to cover any vet bills for those emergencies because a cham always times it to needs a vet visit 3 days away from pay day or an empty bank account!
;P ill have to add your additions except the money part...im broke as @#$%!! maybe ill start a cham piggy bank.

*goes looking for loose change.
 

Ryan Jarosek

New Member
Here is a list of what I keep. It's in my blog if you want to read the rest of the doc.

https://www.chameleonforums.com/blogs/ryan-jarosek/119-new-arrival-bringing-home-new-chameleon.html

I may be biased but I think its really good reading.

Your Supply Closet: Items to have on hand
· Latex or non-latex examination gloves) – Gloves provide protection for you and you chameleon when cleaning or performing examinations. This is key in preventing cross-contamination
· Hydrogen peroxide (7%-12%) is a disinfectant used to clean and disinfect equipment, cages, and other surfaces. Anything under 7% is not effective in killing Coccidia
· Bleach is an excellent disinfectant for equipment, cages, and other surfaces.
· Steam cleaner. This is a high pressure steamer that is a good alternative to chemicals that can damage organic material.
· Disposable towels are invaluable for wiping up messes for use as a disposal liner for cage bottoms.

Your Medicine Cabinet: items to have on hand
· Supplements. Phosphorus free Calcium Powder without Vitamin D3, Calcium Powder with vitamin D3, reptile multi vitamin.
· Syringes of different sizes. These are useful for the administration of medications, supplements, like calcium, for hand feeding, and for cleaning and sterilization, especially of tubing. (Syringes should not be used to administer oral supplements, medications or foods except to sick animals under the direction of a veterinarian.)
· Cotton Balls and Q-tips are useful for cleaning and for the application of creams and topical medications.
· Properly diluted Chlorhexidine Gluconate product. This is an ideal substance for the topical treatment for many common problems such as foot and temporal gland infections.
· Iodine can be an effective topical antiseptic agent although most veterinarians will recommend Chlorhexidine Gluconate.
· Liquid calcium is a supplement that can assist in recovery from and prevention of metabolic bone disease (MBD). It should be administered only under the direction of a veterinarian.
· K-Y jelly is a lubricant that is commonly used in the treatment of rectal and hemipenal prolapses to prevent drying out of the affected organ.
· Tweezers are ideal for handling and extracting small objects.
 
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