what type of veiled chameleon morph

what type of veiled morph is my male. you know how you have the sunburst, torquise. also does anyone have a picture of the veiled chameleon subspecies Chamaeleo c. calcarifer
 

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Veileds don't have real "morphs", which are distinct color varieties. They have variations, but no distinct morphs. For calyptratus, what you see is what you got - terms like sunburst, turquoise, and lemon-yellow are purely for marketing, and simply describe the general coloration of the animals.

He's got a lot of yellow, but not much orange or blue.

I haven't seen many pics of the calcarifer. I thought they were simply a population of hybrids between C.chameleon and calyptratus.
 
thanks, that picture i took on one of his moody day. so if the calcarifer is a hybrid that proves people off that say chameleon won't cross breed with other species right
 
Has it been changed to simply C. aribicus? I thought it used to be Chamaeleo chameleon arabicus. Never paid too much attention, so I couldnt' remember which subspecies it was. A friend of mine got in some Cc orientalis, and they were almost identical to a subdued calptratus. The similarities in markings and overall appearance were amazing.
 

lilj0e

New Member
chameleonsonly sells cross bread panthers. beautiful ones at that i own one of their cross bread panthers
 
panthers are all same species just different morphs. what i'm talking about is breeding veiled to panther and stuff like that. it would be cool to breed a veiled with a jackson and call them jailed chameleon
 

Chris Anderson

Dr. House of Chameleons
Staff member
It is possible for some species to hybridize with other species but they have to be closely related. Veileds and Panthers are too distantly related to hybridize (different genera) and Jackson's and Veileds are too distantly related to hybridize as well (not only different subgenera but one is live birthing while the other lays eggs). Now, there are reports of F. pardalis x F. oustaleti hybrids and a few others but these are all closely related species.

As you said, panthers are all the same species, those hybrids are just specimens collected from different locales so this is completely different.

Chris
 
i just posted that about the veiled and jackson as a joke for its name. what about the carpets have they ever hybridized with the F. oustaleti.
 

steppedinds

New Member
It is possible for some species to hybridize with other species but they have to be closely related. Veileds and Panthers are too distantly related to hybridize (different genera) and Jackson's and Veileds are too distantly related to hybridize as well (not only different subgenera but one is live birthing while the other lays eggs). Now, there are reports of F. pardalis x F. oustaleti hybrids and a few others but these are all closely related species.

As you said, panthers are all the same species, those hybrids are just specimens collected from different locales so this is completely different.

Chris
Just like what he said. What qualifies different species is not whether or not they can have offspring, but if those offspring are still fertile. I.e. a donkey and a horse can make a mule but the mules can not reproduce independently
 

Motherlode Chameleon

Chameleon Enthusiast
Just like what he said. What qualifies different species is not whether or not they can have offspring, but if those offspring are still fertile. I.e. a donkey and a horse can make a mule but the mules can not reproduce independently
Actually I had this conversation with UC Davis Biology Professor Patrick Randolph and on very rare occasions mules have been known to reproduce.
 
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