What type of chameleon to get?

MWheelock

Veterinarian
I will have an extra cage 18"x18"x12" with uvb lamp, basking lamp an hook up to automated misting system when my ambanja panther moves into his "big boy" cage. I hate for the smaller setup to go to waste. (Plus I just want another cham in my office.) (I will have a visual barrier between the cages.)
I would love to have a second chameleon, but the chameleon must fit the following criteria-

1) At adult age would be suitable for this smaller cage without feeling cramped.
2) Must have the same misting/humidity requirements as my panther since they would be set up to the same ProMist system.
3) As an adult would probabably able to eat adult crickets and small roaches as it's base source of nutrition.
4) It doesn't necessarily need to be an easy to care for species.
5) It doesn't have to be magnificently colored either.
6) It would be a bonus if it were a species that could cohabitate as a breeding pair in that small space. (It would also be a bonus if it could do the dishes, wash the car, do juggling tricks,...:)

Thanks y'all. I eagerly await your opinions.
Matthew
 

Heika

New Member
That is a pretty small cage for an adult chameleon species. Unfortunately, leaf chameleons aren't supposed to do very well in screened enclosures. Have you looked at any of the arboreal gecko species? They are fascinating, and from what I have read, many require less space than a chameleon, eat similar foods, and require regular misting too.

Heika
 

MWheelock

Veterinarian
Yeah,
I figured as much. . .I couldn't come up with a cham off hand that would fit these requirements, that's why I was asking.

I did think of some arboreal geckos, but I'd like something primarily diurnal that I may see while I'm at work during the day.

Oh well, thanks for confirming what I already suspected.

Matthew
 
Use it to keep the chameleon in while you are sanitizing its cage.
Or to put it outside in the natural sun.

Dwarf day geckos are a possibility.
 

MWheelock

Veterinarian
Thanks for all your suggestions

Hey Jerm,

I'm actually a small animal and exotics vet in Charlotte, NC. Manga's cage sits behind my desk in a secluded office. (Fortunately, Manga doesn't need to travel if he gets sick.)

I have worked a preceptorship at the Baton Rouge Zoo, Wildlife and Raptor Rehabilitation, and have been fortunate to own and do work on many species of reptiles. I have treated many chameleons but have been reluctant in the past to take the "ultimate step" up to owning chams because of the requirements of time, money, and money (as I'm sure that you all are aware:) )

I am very much enjoying the forum as I get to talk to numerous hobbist and breeders who know more about husbandry of their select subspecies and their varying requirements than I will every be able to achieve first hand. I want Manga to be as happy and comfortable as possible and for myself -to keep up with the top current standards of care (books and magazines are usually 2-5 years behind.)

I don't pretend to know about all of the subspecies and that is why I come to the forum to ask questions like the one above. I thought there might be an adult 5"-7"arboreal cham that lives in the same ecosystem as a panther. Please don't think that I would put any animal into too small an enclosure. The only reason that Manga is in it now is that he is still small, and I think he enjoys hunting his food down. Too large of an enclosure may prevent that.

I may take Will's advise and use this cage as an alternative cage while cleaning the cage or keeping Manga outside for a short sunning. Thanks for all your comments.

Matthew
 
Will Hayward said:
Use it to keep the chameleon in while you are sanitizing its cage.
Or to put it outside in the natural sun.

Dwarf day geckos are a possibility.
This is a very good idea, also idont recemend putting a permanent resident inside the cage..
 
I have a few ESU Fresh Air Habitats, (24x12x26), that I will probably be affixing to my yard fence with hooks to sun the chameleons. I'd be able to put an adult in there to bask for the morning, with half of the top covered for shade.
 
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