Trioceros jacksonii xantholophus "slugs".

Solid Snake

Avid Member
Stella has been having health issues for a while now.

She has had edema issues, and I suspected she may be carrying unfertilized eggs, due to her size.

She confirmed this today, by dropping two of these (thus far):




I dont see many pictures of these, or hear about it happening very often, so just wanted to document it.
 
My girl laid 4 slugs back in March. She is still rotund and has not shown any receptivity to the male ...

She had babies last year in July and I got her in August and hoped for a retained clutch or that she would be receptive at some point ... neither happened. She is otherwise healthy and happy.
 

Playdo

New Member
This is off subject but I LOVE HER COLOR. She's got such an intense shade of green I adore it :). Reminds me of my girl Emerald. Also this is a very interesting topic thank you for sharing.
 

Creaturelover123

New Member
My Jackson girl had some of these back in Feb. She died after because her all of her body got infected.(It was her third time having babies/slugs, her body just could not take it.) I did not breed her. :(



But on a happier note, your girl is BEAU-TIF-UL!
 

DanSB

Avid Member
Thank you for sharing!

Is this something that is more or less hard on them than giving birth and would it be healthier to actually be mated than to drop slugs?

She is lovely by the way and I hope she does better for you soon, best wishes.
 

GanonPascal

New Member
My Jackson’s girl just laid about 15 slugs this morning. Gave me a heart attack when I found her this morning with them all stuck to her legs and tail. o_O She’s a little over a year old, definitely a little on the hefty side. Got a photo of the first eight (probably more) or so she dropped.
 

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JacksJill

Chameleon Enthusiast
Thank you for sharing!

Is this something that is more or less hard on them than giving birth and would it be healthier to actually be mated than to drop slugs?

She is lovely by the way and I hope she does better for you soon, best wishes.
They do use some of their resources producing slugs but I doubt it is as much of a burden for their bodies as turning out fully developed young.
I think it is hardest on the owner finding these odd things for the first time.
 

AnamCara

Chameleon Enthusiast
They do use some of their resources producing slugs but I doubt it is as much of a burden for their bodies as turning out fully developed young.
I think it is hardest on the owner finding these odd things for the first time.
So -- do Jacksonii have "slugs" like panthers lay infertile? Is it common? Can you, like with panther eggs, limit/delay the amount/timing by adjusting husbandry / feedings?

I dont have a jackson but would love one in the future.
 

JacksJill

Chameleon Enthusiast
It is very similar, limit feedings and maintain slightly cooler temperatures and they "lay" fewer slugs. Mature females pass slugs every ~3-6 months. seems to happen more in the spring and summer in my species. It doesn't start until they are over a year and a half old. The nice thing is no lay bin necessary.
 

AnamCara

Chameleon Enthusiast
It is very similar, limit feedings and maintain slightly cooler temperatures and they "lay" fewer slugs. Mature females pass slugs every ~3-6 months. seems to happen more in the spring and summer in my species. It doesn't start until they are over a year and a half old. The nice thing is no lay bin necessary.
How is it that one species of chameleon ended up having live birth? Do Jacksonii live in a place/situation where they would never venture to the ground?

Sorry to hijack this thread. I need to go to google now!
 

JoXie411

Chameleon Enthusiast
How is it that one species of chameleon ended up having live birth? Do Jacksonii live in a place/situation where they would never venture to the ground?

Sorry to hijack this thread. I need to go to google now!
That’s a good point I never really asked myself :unsure:
 

JacksJill

Chameleon Enthusiast
Let me know if you find out why. I would love an answer to that question.
I would venture a guess it has more to do with the elevation that they live at and the temperatures of the ground where they would lay. There are other live bearers I don't recall their environments.
 

AnamCara

Chameleon Enthusiast
Let me know if you find out why. I would love an answer to that question.
I would venture a guess it has more to do with the elevation that they live at and the temperatures of the ground where they would lay. There are other live bearers I don't recall their environments.
Wait...

so ovoviviparous means they have eggs hatch INSIDE them? Where does the "shell" go? Is it just a membrane sack?

Google gave me no answers. only questions.
 

JoXie411

Chameleon Enthusiast
Let me know if you find out why. I would love an answer to that question.
I would venture a guess it has more to do with the elevation that they live at and the temperatures of the ground where they would lay. There are other live bearers I don't recall their environments.
Do you know if there are egg eating snakes in there area? I could imagine that could be the reason why they became egg bearers
 

JoXie411

Chameleon Enthusiast
Wait...

so ovoviviparous means they have eggs hatch INSIDE them? Where does the "shell" go? Is it just a membrane sack?

Google gave me no answers. only questions.
I’m thinking it’s more how there are snakes that are live bearers in this case. They just incubate there eggs inside them witch give the illusion of live birth
 
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