Species???

MissMalyn

New Member
So here are some pics of the newest and by far the most beautiful addition to my family. I have rescued him from a friend of a friend. To put it mildly, his viv was not up to scratch, I asked her why it was unkempt and she responded by saying you take him, see how long you can keep it up for. I found out she hadn't fed him for atleast 4 days and her plan was to shut of all his heat sources and starve him to death. Despite this though he has a clean bill of health, I took him from her home straight to the vets. The best reptile vet in my County. I didn't think to ask her what species he was or how old he might be. I was just relieved and ecstatic to know she'd not done him too much harm or damaged him permanently. Can anyone tell me his species, or age roughly? Even a educated guess would serve him well so I can sort out the temps etc...Anything will be greatly appreciated :)
 

kinyonga

Chameleon Enthusiast
It a veiled chameleon (chamaeleo calyptratus).
Looks to be a female that is producing eggs...so you need to put an opaque container at least 12" deep x 12" x 8" filled almost full of washed playsand in her cage so she will have some place to lay them.

Here is some information that I hope will help...
Appropriate cage temperatures aid in digestion and thus play a part indirectly in nutrient absorption. Temperatures needed can vary with the species and age. For hatchling panthers I keep the temperature in the warmest area in the low 80's. For older panthers I keep it in the mid to high 80's for the most part.

Exposure to UVB from either direct sunlight or a proper UVB light allows the chameleon to produce D3 so that it can use the calcium in its system to make/keep the bones strong and be used in other systems in the chameleon as well. The UVB should not pass through glass or plastic no matter whether its from the sun or the UVB light. The most often recommended UVB light is the long linear fluorescent Repti-sun 5.0 tube light. Some of the compacts, spirals and tube lights have caused health issues, but so far there have been no bad reports against this one.

Since many of the feeder insects have a poor ratio of calcium to phosphorus in them, its important to dust the insects just before you feed them to the chameleon at most feedings with a phos.-free calcium powder to help make up for it. (I use Rep-cal phosphorus-free calcium).

If you also dust twice a month with a phos.-free calcium/D3 powder it will ensure that your chameleon gets some D3 without overdoing it. It leaves the chameleon to produce the rest of what it needs through its exposure to the UVB light. D3 from supplements can build up in the system but D3 produced from exposure to UVB shouldn't as long as the chameleon can move in and out of it. (I use Rep-cal phos.-free calcium/D3).

Dusting twice a month as well with a vitamin powder that contains a beta carotene (prOformed) source of vitamin A will ensure that the chameleon gets some vitamins without the danger of overdosing the vitamin A. PrEformed sources of vitamin A can build up in the system and may prevent the D3 from doing its job and push the chameleon towards MBD. However, there is controversy as to whether all/any chameleons can convert the beta carotene and so some people give some prEformed vitamin A once in a while. (I use herptivite which has beta carotene.)

Gutloading/feeding the insects well helps to provide what the chameleon needs. I gutload crickets, roaches, locusts, superworms, etc. with an assortment of greens (dandelions, kale, collards, endive, escarole, mustard greens, etc.) and veggies (carrots, squash, sweet potato, sweet red pepper, zucchini, etc.)

Calcium, phos., D3 and vitamin A are important players in bone health and other systems in the chameleon (muscles, etc.) and they need to be in balance. When trying to balance them, you need to look at the supplements, what you feed the insects and what you feed the chameleon.

Here are some good sites for you to read...
http://chameleonnews.com/07FebWheelock.html
http://web.archive.org/web/200605020...Vitamin.A.html
http://web.archive.org/web/200406080...d.Calcium.html
http://www.uvguide.co.uk/
http://raisingkittytheveiledchameleon.blogspot.com/
http://raisingkittytheveiledchameleon.blogspot.com/2007/12/keeping-female-veiled.html
http://web.archive.org/web/200601140...ww.adcham.com/
If you can't access the sites above that have the word "archive" in you can do it through the WayBackMachine.
 
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Lingling

New Member
It's great that she was given to someone who is going to care for her. Thanks for being so willing to take that on! Sounds like she'll be much happier in your hands than with her previous owner.

Definitely a veiled, and I'd say probably a gravid female. It's hard to judge her age in those pics, because you can't really see her size in relation to anything. Check its back feet for spurs, little bumps on the back of the foot. If they are present, it's a male, if not then it's a she. If it's a female (and it sure does look like it), you might want to get a laying bin in there... the pics aren't real clear, but she looks a little lumpy like she might have eggs.

If you're new to chameleons, it might help you to fill out the "How To Ask For Help" sticky. You can find it in the Health section. That way we can get a better idea of your setup and be able to give you better help. Since she's been neglected for some time already, it's critical that you get her set up correctly right away.
 

jessica

Avid Member
Aww Good job! Shes a cutie

Makes me want to fly to the UK and Donkey Kong that friend of a friend on the head!
 

allencg101

Member
looks like you have her in a glass cage you most deffinatly want to get her into a screen mesh cage as soon as possible. she looks beautiful can i haver her???
 

eisentrauti

Avid Member
looks like you have her in a glass cage you most deffinatly want to get her into a screen mesh cage as soon as possible. she looks beautiful can i haver her???
Please explain me why this species needs a screen cage ? There's one thing which is needed, good lighting and not fluorescent tubes
 

MATT2504

Member
there is no need to place her in a screen cage, as you live in the UK a glass cage will be far better! (mine will be housed in a glass cage)
 

MissMalyn

New Member
Please explain me why this species needs a screen cage ? There's one thing which is needed, good lighting and not fluorescent tubes
hmmm your comment comes across hostile. If intended that way then it's totally unnecessary. The fluorescent light was gone by the 4th day of me rescuing the cham.
 

MissMalyn

New Member
looks like you have her in a glass cage you most deffinatly want to get her into a screen mesh cage as soon as possible. she looks beautiful can i haver her???
the viv is part glass, past screen. I live in a cold house and don't think a full mesh cage would be the best idea.
 

veiled

New Member
you are doing great! just follow the recomendations kinyonga was telling you and you'll be fine. you're glass/screen enclosure will work. good luck
 

jannb

Chameleon Enthusiast
hmmm your comment comes across hostile. If intended that way then it's totally unnecessary. The fluorescent light was gone by the 4th day of me rescuing the cham.
That's just Benny. I'm sure he didn't mean to come across as hostile. You just have to get use to him but over all he can be quite nice and a very knowledgeable member.

I would highly recommend you follow kinyonga's advice. She has been keeping veileds for way over 20 years.

BTW Welcome to the forums and congrats on you new cham.
 

pssh

Avid Member
Benny is german. I dont know if he intends for it to be rude or not, but just pretend it's because he's from germany. :)

Glass can work very well indeed, but only if you use it correctly. Do your homework on the subject and you should be just fine.
 

MissMalyn

New Member
It's great that she was given to someone who is going to care for her. Thanks for being so willing to take that on! Sounds like she'll be much happier in your hands than with her previous owner.

Definitely a veiled, and I'd say probably a gravid female. It's hard to judge her age in those pics, because you can't really see her size in relation to anything. Check its back feet for spurs, little bumps on the back of the foot. If they are present, it's a male, if not then it's a she. If it's a female (and it sure does look like it), you might want to get a laying bin in there... the pics aren't real clear, but she looks a little lumpy like she might have eggs.

If you're new to chameleons, it might help you to fill out the "How To Ask For Help" sticky. You can find it in the Health section. That way we can get a better idea of your setup and be able to give you better help. Since she's been neglected for some time already, it's critical that you get her set up correctly right away.
Does a female produce eggs even without being mated? How long is the gestation period? I've got the set up sorted. I've built a bigger viv with plenty of ventilation. I've sorted the bulbs and have it at optimum temp with a pretty ace basking spot, if I do say so myself. Made a water drip system with a cup to catch the excess. I've included a laying area better to be safe than sorry. I have also checked the safety of the live plants now sharing the viv. I have one very happy cham indeed.
 

pssh

Avid Member
Yes, females produce without mating. She keeps the eggs in her for about a month before laying them. They will not be fertile unless she is mated.

You can attempt to reduce or completely stop her egg laying by using a lower basking temperature, less food (in quantity, not quality,) and make sure she does not see a male. Use the search feature to find info.
 
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