receptive Female veil is hostile towards male

Spell

New Member
Hi experts,

I have a pair of young healthy veils with good appetite. They were both raised in isolation and from estimate should be around 7-8 months old.

1/8/2022:
my female started showing receptive colours. I introduced them both. Female flashed aggressive colours and puffed. Male went straight for female and started headbutting. Female tried to bite male and I quickly separated them. I introduced by placing the male near her open enclosure.

Her appetite dropped significantly coinciding with the introduction attempt and also the 'receptive colour' change. She refused to take any food for 2 days which has never happened before. She is always a glutton.

2/8/2022: just showing her the male without allowing them to contact. She quickly flashes "aggressive" signs and puffed up

3/8/2022: same as before

4/8/2022: still flashing aggressive sign, started to eat 4 decent size crickets today. Did not puff up as much.


Any ideas how to make the male not headbutt her? and how to get her to be welcoming? Is this normal for 2 Veils who have never mated and in their first breeding cycle? I am aware the receptive period may end in 10 or so days time..

veil 1.jpg

This is her receptive colour when i go near.


veil 2.jpg

her receptive colour when she is more calm
veil 3.jpg


this is the aggressive colour when she sees the male


Thank you all for the advice. Feeling quite lost here.
 

MissSkittles

Chameleon Enthusiast
Hi. :) I’ve never bred any of my chams, but I would strongly suggest letting your girl go thru at least one infertile egg laying before mating her. That way you’ll be able to determine that she won’t have any issues with laying and both chams will be fully mature.
My male and one of my females do have a forbidden love. The few times that they’ve managed to take peeks at each other, my male does his beautiful dance for her. I would venture a guess that when your male starts dancing for your female, he may be beyond head butting and want to get down to business.
 

Spell

New Member
Hi. :) I’ve never bred any of my chams, but I would strongly suggest letting your girl go thru at least one infertile egg laying before mating her. That way you’ll be able to determine that she won’t have any issues with laying and both chams will be fully mature.
My male and one of my females do have a forbidden love. The few times that they’ve managed to take peeks at each other, my male does his beautiful dance for her. I would venture a guess that when your male starts dancing for your female, he may be beyond head butting and want to get down to business.

Thank you for the advice. He actually does something like this as well but I assumed he was trying to size her up (thinking he is facing another male). thanks for the video of the dance! will observe and see if he is as talented as yours =D. I would assume that the problems with laying is independent of the eggs being fertile or not. So if they are willing to get it going in the next week, Id be more than happy than to see a batch of otherwise viable eggs go to waste =X. My friend said my male is not handsome enough for her.. AYEEE
 

Charlottethechameleon

Established Member
Hi. :) I’ve never bred any of my chams, but I would strongly suggest letting your girl go thru at least one infertile egg laying before mating her. That way you’ll be able to determine that she won’t have any issues with laying and both chams will be fully mature.
My male and one of my females do have a forbidden love. The few times that they’ve managed to take peeks at each other, my male does his beautiful dance for her. I would venture a guess that when your male starts dancing for your female, he may be beyond head butting and want to get down to business.

Omg how friggin adoreable! It actually looks like hes batting his eye too adoreable thank you for sharing!
 

jannb

Chameleon Enthusiast
You better start saving for babies. They are really expensive. My 28 baby veileds ate 4000 pinhead crickets a week plus fruit flies, baby mantis, baby silks, baby horns and baby supers. You will need many enclosures and lights also. They will fight and bite off each others tails and even legs if not separates by two months or even before. Here’s pictures of my baby setups that I use for hatchlings.

083F1F9D-6158-4346-8FEF-59D6D0C60574.jpeg


5753DC17-C945-4F8A-8BB3-59E9C44A5D2D.jpeg
 
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