r. brevicaudatus

Husbandry Techniques for Rieppeleon brevicaudatus (Bearded Pygmy Chameleon) said:
Males
* Typically are smaller and will have a slimmer body type
* The dorsal crest is more rigid / defined then with a female
* Males have longer tails
* Males will usually have some sort of pattern which is much more apparent especially in the eye turrets/flanks when displaying for a female

Females
* Typically have a larger more rounded body type
* The dorsal crest is rounded less defined
* Females have shorter tails
* Females have more subdued coloration (light browns) with no patterns (or very little) unless stressed
Husbandry Techniques for Rieppeleon brevicaudatus (Bearded Pygmy Chameleon)
 

evertech11

New Member
thanks

thanks for all of the photos and information i cant get enough of r.brev. could you give me some information on where i could buy one? i already have the cage setup from will's link.
 

evertech11

New Member
sorry roo

Will Hayward said:
PS, the article at the link provided was written by the poster above you. :D (roo)
sorry i didnt acknowledge your part in the information but now i see. i also understand from a former thread that you breed r.brev .
 

FL Chams

Established Member
Site Sponsor
Brevs

Here a some photos I shot of some Brevs. Here's a new hatchling and an adult male. These are a really fun species to work with and fairly inexpensive.

Good Luck!
 

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lowendfrequency

New Member
Here are some photos of a few of my brevs.

These two are CB by Roo.



This one is my favorite. She's a WC and has the lightest coloration I've seen in a brev. She also cannot change color.
 

lowendfrequency

New Member
Will Hayward said:
A natural leucistic form maybe?
I've always thought so, but not everyone agrees. Some people have a hard time accepting it as leucitism without the presence of blue eyes, but I've seen leucistic deer with black eyes. She doesn't like the bright sections of the tank either. I'm not sure if it's sensitive eyes or UV skin sensitivity, but I'm sure it's related.
 
lowendfrequency said:
I've always thought so, but not everyone agrees. Some people have a hard time accepting it as leucitism without the presence of blue eyes, but I've seen leucistic deer with black eyes. She doesn't like the bright sections of the tank either. I'm not sure if it's sensitive eyes or UV skin sensitivity, but I'm sure it's related.
I dont think a pygmies eyes are big enough to tell if they are blue or not, so the idea of ruling her out just for that reason is blasphemy. Well you have my vote of confidence that she is- now to find out if its genetic. Prove it out. And search for other like her.
 

Heika

New Member
Huh.. I have at least one leaf cham with blue eyes. I didn't realize it was unusual, so I never paid much attention.. but I have noticed it in one of the males, because they are pretty! Here is a blown up picture of his head:



I will try to get a couple more pictures of him tomorrow that show his eye color, but he is asleep right now. Kyle, I have some eggs incubating now that are sired by this guy. Interested in swapping some blood? I would love to have a couple out of your white female.

Heika
 

Heika

New Member
Looking at the pictures on this post, Roo's little orange striped female appears to have light colored eyes also. I wonder if it is a trait of the orange and yellow r. brevs? This little male is pretty orange and yellow, and Roo's little female is orange as well...? I know next to nothing about reptile genetics... Roo, you (or someone) posted a pic of a bright orange female a while back, I think. If it was you, does she have blue eyes? And, care to swap orange brev blood?!? :D

Heika
 
The colour of the eyes doesnt matter really, its the fact that the skin has no colour pigment, and only white or shades of grey show. This is usually accompanied by blue eyes and called "leucistic".

I dont think there is anything special about red, yellow, orange etc Brevs... but a leucistic brev is a whole other thing. Its not really even a morph, but rather a genetic mutation, which may or may not be proven to be passed on to offspring.

So in short, eye colours mean nothing.
And white pygmies are incredible.


TO lowendfrequency: leucistic isn't always blue, but rather dark and heavily pigment might also be considerd leucistic.
 
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lowendfrequency

New Member
Here's a comparison shot of her and a regular female taken under incandescent lighting, just to show that it isn't the flourescents making her look light. I pulled her out this morning and tried to get a close up of the eyes, but I can't see an iris for the life of me. Either I'm missing it, it doesn't exist, or it's black.

 

evertech11

New Member
leucism

leucistic animals, as Will said, generaly have normal colored eyes. leucism, because the trait is not fully recesive as albinism is, can be inherited by the offspring thouigh not constantly. it's not that the animals skin lacks the color it's that it lacks the enzyme needed to activate the pigments, which would explain your brev's inability to change colors.
 
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