Proven method for clearing up many types of mouthrot!

Lyneeso

New Member
Purchase this petroleum based ointment called Terramycin (oxytetracycline hydrochloride) and also a powder by Nature Zone called ''Rot Gaurd''. The terramycin is a general antibiotic as well as antifungal ointment, it is commonly used to clear up eye infections and fungle infections in horses and other animals. It costs about $19.00;) The ''Rot Gaurd'' is all natural. It has many herbs to enhance and fortify the immune system and promote lightning fast healing!!! It is about $8.00.;) So, mix the two products, the terramycin, and "Rot Gaurd", into a moist claylike paste. Then holding the chameleon (or any other herp) firmly around the body with one hand, with a finger of the other hand, apply generous ammounts of the paste behind lips, so as to fill the space between lips and gums with the paste. Be sure that the paste is not too wet because it will just squeeze out into the mouth cavity:eek:. Those of you who ''chew'' tobaco will be good at this!:p The paste should harden up quite a bit on outsides of lips. If the infection has begun to "curl" the lips outward do to swelling then you should use enough paste to cover the outsides of the lips well. Basically, just smother any sores in it and allow it to crust over. You should notice the sores getting darker and darker as they are healing untill they are nearly black. This is the equivalent to a scab. Usually the whole process takes anywhere from 3-9 weeks depending on how bad of a case of mouth rot. I have used this method successfully many times on other herps and now with much sucess on my female veiled cham!!! Yeah they will swallow some of it sometimes, but Iv'e never experienced any adverse effects. SERIOUSLY THOUGH, TRY THIS!!! IT WILL WORK 95% OF THE TIME!!!!!!!!
BTW: you can repeat when you feel necessary, I suggest about every 2-3 days!.
Lyneeso
 
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YogiGirl

New Member
Could you maybe post a picture of what mouthrot would look like? I think my cham might have had this in the past, but it has cleared up on its own since.
 

Lyneeso

New Member
Could you maybe post a picture of what mouthrot would look like? I think my cham might have had this in the past, but it has cleared up on its own since.

sorry, don't have a working camera. Hopefully soon I will have a camera and I can begin to share photos!
 

Lyneeso

New Member
keep in mind that it is for large animals. I myself would definately NOT use it on a chameleons eye they are far to delicate and small. Not to mention it would be impossible to get an amount small enough into the eye without completely filling the eye. But if you do it and get some good results let me know.
 

TylerStewart

Right Wing Extremist
Site Sponsor
Terramycin works like a champ in the eyes of chameleons. I used to use it with any foggy eye issues or mild eye issues, lip curling, etc. If the eye is scratched or damaged in some way, it's probably too severe for Terramycin, but for simple eye and lip fixes, there's nothing better out there. You can usually find it at feed stores.
 

palmbob

New Member
Terramycin is not an antifungal. It is only an antibiotic though a fairly broad-spectrum one. It is made specifically for ophthalmic use, though it can be used topically... however it is not meant for oral use and excessive ingestion could cause some bacterial gastrointestinal upset, so careful with how much of this is put in the mouth. It's good to get rid of mouth rot, but also a good idea to find out why it was there in the first place and try to be sure that problem is corrected. There is always a reason for mouth rot.
 

RSGriff

New Member
Could you maybe post a picture of what mouthrot would look like? I think my cham might have had this in the past, but it has cleared up on its own since.

This is a pretty bad case of mouth rot. I got her from craigslist like this and it is clearing up now.

 

jhappe

New Member
Terramycin is not an antifungal. It is only an antibiotic though a fairly broad-spectrum one. It is made specifically for ophthalmic use, though it can be used topically... however it is not meant for oral use and excessive ingestion could cause some bacterial gastrointestinal upset, so careful with how much of this is put in the mouth. It's good to get rid of mouth rot, but also a good idea to find out why it was there in the first place and try to be sure that problem is corrected. There is always a reason for mouth rot.

what are some common reasons?
 

kinyonga

Chameleon Enthusiast
Lyneeso said..."I have used this method successfully many times on other herps and now with much sucess on my female veiled cham!!!"...do you treat the same chameleon more than once (does the infection come back)?
 

jojackson

New Member
Good question Kin,
makes me wonder how successful it actually is. Im sure various types of bacteria are involved, so Im wondering if the drug mentioned is even designed for such infections or is a 'blanket' type antibiotic?
Im thinking bacteria's might develope something of a resistance to the same drug and it become less effective? Much the way human antibiotics tend to.

edit: missed this!

Originally Posted by palmbob
Terramycin is not an antifungal. It is only an antibiotic though a fairly broad-spectrum one. It is made specifically for ophthalmic use, though it can be used topically... however it is not meant for oral use and excessive ingestion could cause some bacterial gastrointestinal upset, so careful with how much of this is put in the mouth. It's good to get rid of mouth rot, but also a good idea to find out why it was there in the first place and try to be sure that problem is corrected. There is always a reason for mouth rot.

Not sure I like the idea of experimental use of drugs for purpouses other than intended, nor self diagnosis, could be dangerous thing.
 

palmbob

New Member
Mouth rot is just a general term for an oral infection and it can have dozens of different reasons to exist, from simple trauma (biting on a stick or sharp object, getting bit by prey (eg large mealworms), injury to a tooth etc.), chronic debilitation/dehydration/hypothermia or any excessive stress that affects the immune system, or even lack of sunlight. That is why it is 'common'- there are so many causes... but by far the most common causes are improper husbandry (not saying that's what caused your lizard's problems, but mouth rot is rare in lizards kept in 'perfect' environmental situations).
 
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