Parsonii chameleons?

Apl3jck

New Member
Parsonii chameleons are SO COOL!!!! I've been looking at them all day and they look like legit dinosaurs! I've heard that taking care of them can be a lot different than other breeds but someday when I have a more disposable budget, I hope to get one. How does someone go about getting one? What's the approximate cost? Can anyone provide any insight on this? Thank you.
 

Ace

Avid Member
alot of space, alot of money, alot of time, alot of knowledge, alot of pateience

most are WC, rare CB, approx $2,000. either one

try fauna classifieds, but beecareful of any scammers, plus, you might need help to find one that is in decent health, you dont want to get one you paid and goes down hill.

parsons are up there in care, so think about it
 

Lovereps

Avid Member
The answer is BIG BUCKS.
Seriously, they go for several thousand dollars.
They are really a species which ideally should be owned by someone who is able to breed them, since they're tough to come by.
If you look at recent posts to the classifieds and FLChams website, you will see what they have been selling for.
As much as I think they are cool, I wouldn't want to have to spend the money to feed such a large cham, either.
 

Texas Panther Man

New Member
Try 2500 and up for most parsonni. This isnt an animal you can just research for a few days and bring home. You need to find people that keep parsons and beg for info. Most dont post about their parsons too often. It takes alot of time, money, & begging to get into the ever alusive parsons club.
 

Ace

Avid Member
Try 2500 and up for most parsonni. This isnt an animal you can just research for a few days and bring home. You need to find people that keep parsons and beg for info. Most dont post about their parsons too often. It takes alot of time, money, & begging to get into the ever alusive parsons club.
lol...forgot abotu the ellusive club, ah yes, beg you must, their secrets you must need to keep your animal thriving, and its those that get them , they intend to breed, since i think they have a low number in populaton in madagascar.

it takes awhile for them to mature and breed, and i hear about 2 years for the eggs to hatch:)
 
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Apl3jck

New Member
Hmm ok, yea sounds like a hobbie I should look into persuing when im making bug bucks and have a lot of time, however, the amount of care isn't much of a downside to me, I love the work put into caring for a chameleon. I hope someday I can get one but I understand it's a big responsibility. Thanks
Guys :)
 

Chris Anderson

Dr. House of Chameleons
Staff member
Ace - I'm sure you mean well but making things up is not at all helpful to anyone. Do you have any semblance of a clue what the populations of C. parsonii in Madagascar actually are or the origins and availability of this species in captivity?

Apl3jck - There have been many threads posted about the same C. parsonii questions you're asking. If you search for "parsonii" in the forum's search function you should be able to come up with a lot of information. Some of it is also people talking about things they have never done any research on, let alone have any experience with, but you can usually determine pretty easily what information is credible.

Chris
 

Ace

Avid Member
Ace - I'm sure you mean well but making things up is not at all helpful to anyone. Do you have any semblance of a clue what the populations of C. parsonii in Madagascar actually are or the origins and availability of this species in captivity?

Chris
Hi Dr. Anderson,

i would like to apologize if what i said about the population was just plain false, based from what i read and understand, c.parsonii were over exported? and at the time people in the U.S did not know how to care for them, let alone breed and hatch eggs. I thought this would be the reason if there are indead low numbers in madagascar, and also legal issues of limiting the export of cetain chameleons, especially C.parsonii. If i am mistaken, please correct me, and maybe if you can send me links of your correct information for future reference.

thanks in advance
 

Carlton

Chameleon Enthusiast
Hi Dr. Anderson,

i would like to apologize if what i said about the population was just plain false, based from what i read and understand, c.parsonii were over exported? and at the time people in the U.S did not know how to care for them, let alone breed and hatch eggs. I thought this would be the reason if there are indead low numbers in madagascar, and also legal issues of limiting the export of cetain chameleons, especially C.parsonii. If i am mistaken, please correct me, and maybe if you can send me links of your correct information for future reference.

thanks in advance
Parsoni are more threatened by habitat loss. Of course their $$ value adds to their problems (incentives to collect for export or smuggle), but much of the mature rainforest canopy habitat they seem specific to is gone. They are long lived and probably re-populate fairly slowly when a local population is wiped out. The bigger problem is, no one really knows just what condition the wild population is in and just what level of habitat loss, wild capture, genetic isolation, etc. the species can stand without disappearing.
 

Chris Anderson

Dr. House of Chameleons
Staff member
Hi Ace,

The numbers of C. parsonii that were exported prior to their ban are indeed very high and you are correct to say that most of those failed to survive long term, let alone breed successfully. This species has been breed on multiple occasions in captivity, however, and last I heard, F2 had been reached.

CITES issued a recommendation to ban importation of all but 4 Chamaeleo sp. (now Furcifer and Calumma sp.) because the Malagasy Management Authority failed to provide a satisfactory response to five recommendations the CITES Secretariat directed at them. Included in these are showing ability to form an effective regulatory agency and process and show scientific justification that trade would not impact wild populations.

A number of publications have considered C. parsonii locally abundant within their range. Based on the population density of C. p. cristifer, Brady & Griffiths (1999) estimated the population of C. parsonii be be in the 3.8-37.5 million range. While updated and specific population estimates are needed for most species, their ban from export was not based on data indicating their populations were declining, but rather as a means to prevent it from happening before an assessment could be made.

FYI, please call me Chris, I've only received my PhD Candidacy (not a Dr. yet) and the formality of being referred to as Dr. isn't something I am overly worried about once I do defend.

Chris
 

Ace

Avid Member
Hi Ace,

The numbers of C. parsonii that were exported prior to their ban are indeed very high and you are correct to say that most of those failed to survive long term, let alone breed successfully. This species has been breed on multiple occasions in captivity, however, and last I heard, F2 had been reached.

CITES issued a recommendation to ban importation of all but 4 Chamaeleo sp. (now Furcifer and Calumma sp.) because the Malagasy Management Authority failed to provide a satisfactory response to five recommendations the CITES Secretariat directed at them. Included in these are showing ability to form an effective regulatory agency and process and show scientific justification that trade would not impact wild populations.

A number of publications have considered C. parsonii locally abundant within their range. Based on the population density of C. p. cristifer, Brady & Griffiths (1999) estimated the population of C. parsonii be be in the 3.8-37.5 million range. While updated and specific population estimates are needed for most species, their ban from export was not based on data indicating their populations were declining, but rather as a means to prevent it from happening before an assessment could be made.

FYI, please call me Chris, I've only received my PhD Candidacy (not a Dr. yet) and the formality of being referred to as Dr. isn't something I am overly worried about once I do defend.

Chris
oic now i think got the gist of it.:)

thank you Chris
 
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