Over feeding a female panther.

Eltortu

Established Member
Just read that overfeeding a female veiled will make her lay eggs early. Is it the same with female panthers?
 

Eltortu

Established Member
I have two females that are about six months old and they eat like pigs! Yesterday I went to a Mom & Pop pet store to get crickets -Petsmart was out of large crickets- and they were selling Butterworms, so I bought the last fifty the had. They were all over them! I think by Tuesday they will be gone!...
 

Elizadolots

New Member
I actually think the reverse is true: there's no evidence (so far) that controlling the amount a female panther eats, and keeping her at a cooler temperature will result in fewer, smaller clutches.

I suspect the reason for that is that those who are willing and able to take the time for the research have not done it with panthers.

I think your safest bet is to restrict a female's diet in hopes of reducing the size/frequency of egg bearing.

I'm not saying starve her, but don't overfeed.
 

Elizadolots

New Member
Noting that Sandra posted while I was composing...

Yes, like birds, reptiles who bear eggs will do so regardless of fertility.
 

Eltortu

Established Member
I actually think the reverse is true: there's no evidence (so far) that controlling the amount a female panther eats, and keeping her at a cooler temperature will result in fewer, smaller clutches.

I suspect the reason for that is that those who are willing and able to take the time for the research have not done it with panthers.

I think your safest bet is to restrict a female's diet in hopes of reducing the size/frequency of egg bearing.

I'm not saying starve her, but don't overfeed.
My male panther stops when full -usually 5~8 feeders- he just turns around and goes about his cage. But my females I stop at about 5-7 feeders...
 

pssh

Avid Member
I know some have had female panthers not lay until they were well over a year old (and sometimes even two!) this was while their diets were monitored. Once they start laying, they don't stop. You can't stop them like veileds.
 

Eltortu

Established Member
Noting that Sandra posted while I was composing...

Yes, like birds, reptiles who bear eggs will do so regardless of fertility.
I know some have had female panthers not lay until they were well over a year old (and sometimes even two!) this was while their diets were monitored. Once they start laying, they don't stop. You can't stop them like veileds.
Just learn something new, than you!
 

kinyonga

Chameleon Enthusiast
Some species of chameleon will produce eggs even when not mated and others won't.

Regarding controlling panther chameleon's egg laying...I have not been able to stop them from laying eggs like I have with the veileds..but I was afraid to push them further to see if it would work. I have always only had clutches in the range of 20 eggs though.
 

sandrachameleon

Chameleon Enthusiast
I actually think the reverse is true: there's no evidence (so far) that controlling the amount a female panther eats, and keeping her at a cooler temperature will result in fewer, smaller clutches.
Well I would say there is evidence, though no scientific studies that Im aware of. Although anecdotal, I have found that by controlling temp and not over-feeding and not showing a male to females I've had female panthers that did not lay eggs until they were two years old. I then purposefully increased temp and food intake because I was breeding themI believe had I continued with the control measures, they would have remained eggless indefinately. By returning to controlled food and temp later, I found that clutches were smaller (fewer than 20 eggs, and very small eggs) only twice a year, whereas those that got more food and warmer temps had more eggs, of a larger size, and more often.
 

Elizadolots

New Member
Hence the rest of my post:
I suspect the reason for that is that those who are willing and able to take the time for the research have not done it with panthers.

I think your safest bet is to restrict a female's diet in hopes of reducing the size/frequency of egg bearing.
 

Texas Panther Man

New Member
I agree with Sandra. Feed adult females on an every other day schedule and monitor food intake. Particularly in those that are prone to over eatting. Ive managed to reduce the size of my female falys' clutches by doing this method. I do feed her liberally just after oviposition though. Then after she has recovered we go back to the every other day schedule. (when i say liberally i mean i give her a few extras to help her recover, i dont let her gourge herself)
 
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