Number of species bred?

Number of species bred?

  • zero

    Votes: 177 58.4%
  • one - two

    Votes: 77 25.4%
  • three - four

    Votes: 27 8.9%
  • five - ten

    Votes: 9 3.0%
  • ten plus

    Votes: 13 4.3%

  • Total voters
    303

Motherlode Chameleon

Chameleon Enthusiast
Just something neat to make a thread about. How many species have you the breeders on this forum bred?

Me I have kept 17 species and had eggs from 4 species yet have only bred 3 species.

F.pardalis, F.lateralis, F. verrucosus semicristatus (semicristatus captive hatched) that I have bred and hatched out neonates. I had one clutch of T.montium that never hatched.
 
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Cainschams

New Member
Ive only bred pardalis. However, I have captive hatched out 3 soon to be 4 clutches, I hope, of K. tavetana. I also had captive born but not bred Tr. bitaneatus that did not do well and now have two clutches of Tr. ellioti that seem to be doing well. My main focus right now is getting my tenuis to breed and also at some point getting some of my CH tavetana to breed. This will be a while for the tavetana though but I WILL DO IT!!!:D
 

laurie

Retired Moderator
I have breed panthers, veileds, and now raised captive hatched quads. Next comes c/b Jacksons, quads, tav's and maybe carpets - just cause they are so cute.:D
 

chams1

Member
Panthers, veileds, translucent veileds (26 eggs to hatch any day now), carpets, sternfeldi (live bearing) and.........................melleri (they are sweating as I'm writing this)!! But I've kept a dozen other species which either bred and produced eggs that didn't hatch or just didn't breed at all.
 

Syn

Avid Member
Zero species bred. No plans to, either. I think over-saturating the market won't do much good.
 

Motherlode Chameleon

Chameleon Enthusiast
Zero species bred. No plans to, either. I think over-saturating the market won't do much good.
Your not going to over saturate the market with some underrated species like Oustaleti and Verrucosus not many breeders breed them. Some more popular and high profile species could use more captive breeding and less wild imports such as Mellers chameleons.:D
 
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Motherlode Chameleon

Chameleon Enthusiast
I actually would have attempted to breed more except during past times mainly the summer when working with certain conditions would not me allow to consider breeding some species. Such as during the summer only having swamp coolers in the main house and during the summer house temperatures were regularly in the high 80's F, now with a house that has got AC I can consider other species that previously I would not consider attempting to breed (montane species).
 

Monties1982

Avid Member
I actually would have attempted to breed more except during past times mainly the summer when working with certain conditions would not me allow to consider breeding some species. Such as during the summer only having swamp coolers in the main house and during the summer house temperatures were regularly in the high 80's F, now with a house that has got AC I can consider other species that previously I would not consider attempting to breed (montane species).
That's good. We need more montane breeders out there ;)
 

Syn

Avid Member
Just breed the species you rarely see CB. That way, you don't have to worry about over-saturating the market :p
Your not going to over saturate the market with some underrated species like Oustaleti and Verrucosus not many breeders breed them. Some more popular and high profile species could use more captive breeding and less wild imports such as Mellers chameleons.:D
I have considered that many times, but the demand of such species isn't as high as you'd think. The species that are in high demand, such as Melleri.. I just don't have the room for them, and the humidity and heat requirements would prevent me from keeping them even if I did have the room.
 

Motherlode Chameleon

Chameleon Enthusiast
I have considered that many times, but the demand of such species isn't as high as you'd think. The species that are in high demand, such as Melleri.. I just don't have the room for them, and the humidity and heat requirements would prevent me from keeping them even if I did have the room.

That's why because they are underrated species. Oustaletis are like a large beast version of a panther that can become as friendly as a puppy dog while Verrucosus remind me of a super sized Brookesia. Just most people overlook them because they go for chameleons with more flashy colors or features.
 
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Syn

Avid Member
That's why because they are underrated species. Oustaletis are like a large beast version of a panther that can become as friendly as a puppy dog while Verrucosus remind me of a super sized Brookesia. Just most people overlook them because they go for chameleons with more flashy colors or features.
Again, over-saturation. Why supply something that isn't in demand?
 

Motherlode Chameleon

Chameleon Enthusiast
Again, over-saturation. Why supply something that isn't in demand?
Just because you do not want to work with them does not mean other people would not work with them. Their not the most popular species however I would totally work with them again.:D

It is not over saturation it is called a selection.
 
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Syn

Avid Member
Just because you do not want to work with them does not mean other people would not work with them. Their not the most popular species however I would totally work with them again.:D

It is not over saturation it is called a selection.
Are you implying I don't want to work with them? I'd love to.

Call it what you want.
 

Monties1982

Avid Member
I think that low demand for some of the rarer species is in part due to the fact people don't see them available much and so don't think about them. They are also almost always wild caught and most people don't want wild caught chameleons due to the possible health and acclimation concerns, but if there were more captive bred available, I think there would be more demand for them. I don't want to push you into working with rarer species if you're not really that interested in working with them, though. You should do whatever you're interested in and not what others want you to do to support what they're interested in.
 

morpheon

New Member
Syn, with your soon to become a new job, you should start breeding Parsoniis! Since you'll get rich pretty fast, buying a few of these at $2500 each shouldn't be a problem! ;)

I also agree with Mother about a few species that aren't very commun with a high demand! Just look at the sale section of these boards! To me, easily 90% of the chameleons for sale get sold within a week! ;)

And by the way, there are a few Pardalis that arent very commun, like the St-Maries. This would solve your problem of space with bigger species, like Parsonii, Melleri, Verrucosus and Oustalletis.


About the original post, i have never breed any, but as soon as i find a female for my male Sambava, i ll try it! ;)
 

james L

Established Member
So far F.Pardilis, C.Calyptratus, R.Brevicaudatus succesfully. I've also bred T.Wernerii twice but was never able to get a fertile clutch. Hoping the next will be C.Senegalensis.
 

eisentrauti

Avid Member
brevicaudatus, temporalis, spinosus, acuminatus, uthmoelleri, red rudis, merumontanus, hoehnelii, thamnobates, setaroi.
I hope this year again for merumontanus; one or two other bradypodion species; oxyrhina, tenuis and uthmoelleri.
And especially if I can get my hands on them: Some Ugandan species :)
 

Motherlode Chameleon

Chameleon Enthusiast
brevicaudatus, temporalis, spinosus, acuminatus, uthmoelleri, red rudis, merumontanus, hoehnelii, thamnobates, setaroi.
I hope this year again for merumontanus; one or two other bradypodion species; oxyrhina, tenuis and uthmoelleri.
And especially if I can get my hands on them: Some Ugandan species :)
Going for 12 Good job eisentrauti! Is there anyone out there that is over 20 or 30 species bred?
 
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