Night temps during summer months?

PlanetRemulak

Avid Member
So as of yet, I am not currently owned by any chameleons (just being real, we all know who’s really in charge). I’m still in the heavy research/supply buying phase.. trying to get everything figured out first and hopefully maximize my chances at success well before bringing any new animals into my home.

I’m from the Central Valley in California, and things out here are seriously HOT and dry. In-between seasons like autumn and spring are things of legend around here - we don’t really get either. One week it’s winter, the next week it’s in the mid 70’s and everything is in bloom (in February). Midway through April all the way up until the end of October, things are stupidly hot. Yesterday’s high was 103, today‘s was 100. It appears as though the remainder of the week and this weekend will be a little cooler, but temps over 100 are a regular occurrence around here. Last year, we even saw temps of 107-110. I say all this to make the following point: It can be really difficult to get the temperature in my house below 80. On especially warm days like today, my thermostat stays at a pretty consistent 80-81 degrees, and this is even after the AC has been on for a while. Currently it is 11 PM and my thermostat is still showing 81, so I’m looking at temperatures of 80-81 degrees all day and even during the night as well.

i‘m concerned about night time temperature drops. What night time temps do any of you find that your panther chameleons typically do best in? I’m concerned that a panther cham may not do well in my climate if I am not able to achieve an acceptable drop in temperature after the lights go off. Each room in my house has a ceiling fan, which I could keep on to prevent air from stagnating. Sometimes we also get a really nice night time breeze, so we keep our windows open instead of running the AC. Does using a fogger at night help with keeping things cool? I definitely don’t mind investing in one, but my concern is moisture sitting in 80 degree air causing respiratory infections (and mold).

Thoughts/advice? Thank you!
 

ERKleRose

Chameleon Enthusiast
Could you get a portable or window ac system for the room your cham will be kept in? 75*F is really the preferred max for ambient daytime temps. A minimum of 68*F at night is the max but preferably 65*F or lower is ideal
 

Lpsouth1978

Avid Member
So as of yet, I am not currently owned by any chameleons (just being real, we all know who’s really in charge). I’m still in the heavy research/supply buying phase.. trying to get everything figured out first and hopefully maximize my chances at success well before bringing any new animals into my home.

I’m from the Central Valley in California, and things out here are seriously HOT and dry. In-between seasons like autumn and spring are things of legend around here - we don’t really get either. One week it’s winter, the next week it’s in the mid 70’s and everything is in bloom (in February). Midway through April all the way up until the end of October, things are stupidly hot. Yesterday’s high was 103, today‘s was 100. It appears as though the remainder of the week and this weekend will be a little cooler, but temps over 100 are a regular occurrence around here. Last year, we even saw temps of 107-110. I say all this to make the following point: It can be really difficult to get the temperature in my house below 80. On especially warm days like today, my thermostat stays at a pretty consistent 80-81 degrees, and this is even after the AC has been on for a while. Currently it is 11 PM and my thermostat is still showing 81, so I’m looking at temperatures of 80-81 degrees all day and even during the night as well.

i‘m concerned about night time temperature drops. What night time temps do any of you find that your panther chameleons typically do best in? I’m concerned that a panther cham may not do well in my climate if I am not able to achieve an acceptable drop in temperature after the lights go off. Each room in my house has a ceiling fan, which I could keep on to prevent air from stagnating. Sometimes we also get a really nice night time breeze, so we keep our windows open instead of running the AC. Does using a fogger at night help with keeping things cool? I definitely don’t mind investing in one, but my concern is moisture sitting in 80 degree air causing respiratory infections (and mold).

Thoughts/advice? Thank you!
I have very much the same issue. I live in Phoenix and we had 145 days of 100+ degree weather last year. Today we are looking at 107. So far my boys are doing well. My night time temps only get down to ~78 at night and the room is 80 during the day (my electric bill is already getting ridiculous). My chams seem to hang out up top during the morning and hang out lower in the cage for a good part of the day.

I would not use the fogger in these temps, it is likely to cause respiratory infections. I used one all winter, but as temps have increased, I took it off line for now. I just mist more to make up for the loss of the fogger.
 

Klyde O'Scope

Chameleon Enthusiast
On the plus side, at those temps you may not need a basking lamp! 😁 (Only half kidding)

Sounds like you're planning on a panther of some locale. Once you know the locale, I would use that information to zoom in on the climate in that region of Madagascar and see how they compare—temps, humidity, etc.

A supplemental room/window AC unit (if necessary) would be my first thought too. Some folks are trying evaporative coolers, but IME they rarely perform as hyped.

I don't recall exactly where Bill Strand ( DeremensisBlue ) lives, but he's been keeping all kinds of chameleons indoors & outdoors in CA for years/decades. Couldn't hurt to send a PM.
 

Lpsouth1978

Avid Member
Off topic but how do you survive in a house that's 80°? I dont think I could make it, I'm a very cold person 🤣
It took me years, and I generally try not to. There is no one home during the day, so the temps are allowed to be a bit higher than when I am there. Unfortunately, summer cooling costs dictate how much I am willing to suffer. If I kept the house @ 75* or lower through the summer, I would pay $600+/month on electric alone. Just not in the budget. :(
 

PlanetRemulak

Avid Member
It took me years, and I generally try not to. There is no one home during the day, so the temps are allowed to be a bit higher than when I am there. Unfortunately, summer cooling costs dictate how much I am willing to suffer. If I kept the house @ 75* or lower through the summer, I would pay $600+/month on electric alone. Just not in the budget. :(
Exactly the same problem here!! Trying to just basically exist in a house that‘s frequently sitting at 80 degrees is miserable. I’ve got my own set of health issues that are made worse by the heat, so I run the AC during the day when my fiancé isn’t home (to hell with what he says 🤣). Like @Lpsouth1978 said, our energy bill during the summer months is entirely dictated by how much we are willing to suffer. We would also be paying around 600 monthly just to keep the house at around 75 or below. I so wish we could move! Never say never, I guess..
 

PlanetRemulak

Avid Member
Could you get a portable or window ac system for the room your cham will be kept in? 75*F is really the preferred max for ambient daytime temps. A minimum of 68*F at night is the max but preferably 65*F or lower is ideal

Both options are possible, although I sense my fiancé would throw a fit over the prospect of a window AC. We could keep the cham in our room (it‘s low traffic during the day), that way the window cooler could face the back yard and I wouldn’t have to listen to him gripe about our neighbors being able to see my chameleon’s air conditioner. 😂 Although, I really could use one myself to make it easier to breathe at night during the summer months.. he might be willing to compromise if we install a window unit with my health issues in mind.

A portable unit may be more feasible. I’ll definitely research that option first. Thank you or your input!
 

PlanetRemulak

Avid Member
I have very much the same issue. I live in Phoenix and we had 145 days of 100+ degree weather last year. Today we are looking at 107. So far my boys are doing well. My night time temps only get down to ~78 at night and the room is 80 during the day (my electric bill is already getting ridiculous). My chams seem to hang out up top during the morning and hang out lower in the cage for a good part of the day.

I would not use the fogger in these temps, it is likely to cause respiratory infections. I used one all winter, but as temps have increased, I took it off line for now. I just mist more to make up for the loss of the fogger.
Miserable, isn’t it?! I so feel your pain, both in regards to the insane heat and your electric bill. :’(

What types of chameleons do you keep, and what does your misting schedule look like now that you’ve eliminated the fogger? Thank you for your reply!
 

PlanetRemulak

Avid Member
On the plus side, at those temps you may not need a basking lamp! 😁 (Only half kidding)

Sounds like you're planning on a panther of some locale. Once you know the locale, I would use that information to zoom in on the climate in that region of Madagascar and see how they compare—temps, humidity, etc.

A supplemental room/window AC unit (if necessary) would be my first thought too. Some folks are trying evaporative coolers, but IME they rarely perform as hyped.

I don't recall exactly where Bill Strand ( DeremensisBlue ) lives, but he's been keeping all kinds of chameleons indoors & outdoors in CA for years/decades. Couldn't hurt to send a PM.
I definitely am planning on a panther! The ambanja locale is what I am after specifically. Great advice - I will definitely look into that particular region’s climate. I also love the idea of getting Bill Strand’s input on this! I’ll shoot him a PM regarding this same issue and see what he has to say.
 

Lpsouth1978

Avid Member
I have a just over 1 year old Sambava x Ambilobe male and a 4.5 month Ambilobe. I have the mister set to go off for 3 minutes @ 11am, 2pm, and 6 pm. My boys both drink well and are well hydrated, so it seems to do the job. It is warm and dry enough here right now that this seems to allow the enclosures to dry out before the next misting. Once the monsoon rains come and humidity increases, I will have to re-adjust the schedule.
 
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