my panther loves strawberries lol

connor

New Member
i ran outta crikets this morning riley was extra hungry day before lol but anyways i read that you can feedstrawberries and other stuff so i offered him cut up strawberries and he loved them!! lol but his tounge couldnt grab em so he walked up and bit them outta my hand lol i just thopught it was wierd for him to like strawberries!:D
 
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beni

New Member
Most of the fruit containes to much sugar to be fed to veiled cham.


PS:you hardly find strawberries, bananas and orange in Yemen...
 

kinyonga

Chameleon Enthusiast
Fruits naturally contain between one percent and seven percent fructose. There are some that are higher.

If sugar is not good for chameleons, then why do we feed fruit flies to chameleons?? What about waxworms that can't help but to ingest honey along with the wax?

And why do chameleons eat moths and butterflies that sip sugar-laden nectar in the wild?

Oranges in Yemen...
http://www.kolodner.com/slideshows/tawila-mahwit/1.html

http://ag.arizona.edu/~lmilich/yf1.html
" The Marib area grows oranges and other fruits/vegetables for Sana'a and other urban markets."

http://www.newint.org/issue247/profile.htm
"Main Exports: Oil, coffee, fish & seafood, grapes, oranges, lemons & soft fruits."

Here are good lists of fruits, etc. grown in Yemen including oranges and bananas...
"Arable land : 1.75 million hectares out of 5,55,000 sq. kms. of total area Agricultural crops wheat, maize, sorghum, millet, barley, legumes, tomatoes, onions, potatoes, melons, watermelons, Qat, cotton, sesame, tobacco, coffee, dates bananas, grapes, oranges, papayas, lemon."
http://meaindia.nic.in/foreignrelation/yemen.htm

"Along the apron of the south western Arabian Peninsula, facing the Red Sea, lie the coastal lowland known as the Tihamah. The Tihama is an arid zone along the Red Sea. Lush vegetation is found in the main wadis, Mawr, Surdud, Siham and Zabid. Life is concentrated on the edges, the edges of foothills, wadis, the coastline, near mangrove swamps and wherever fresh water can be found. Dates, coconuts, and fruits are grown throughout the area, and oranges, papayas, bananas, lemons in low lying land."
http://www.buzzle.com/editorials/5-24-2006-97121.asp
 

Brad Ramsey

Retired Moderator
Once again Kinyonga reminds us that opinion and fact are not always the same thing.
Doing your research before posting advice or clearly stating your comment as an opinion wins you much more respect as a keeper than presenting opinion or speculation as fact.

-Brad
 

Jordan

New Member
Feeding fruit is not good. They may or may not do it in the wild. I have never seen any evidence to say whether it is true or not. I suppose it is possible but in captivity it is risky.

The following applies to humans but maybe applicable to chameleons. I do not believe anyone has done research in this field for chameleons or ever will.

Fructose is a sugar (monosaccharide). Unlike other sugars it does not have a high blood sugar rise evident by it's low score on the glycemic index. Other sugars are processed in the blood stream. Fructose is processed in the liver. When the liver encounters a large dose it can not handle it. Instead of releasing it as useable energy it is turned into fat and is sent into the blood stream as triglycerides.

High triglycerides is a risk factor for heart disease.
Strong evidence links it to insulin resitance and then type 2 diabetes.



1-7 percent can quickly change to 80-90 percent depending on what part of the fruit it is. In relation to the overall size of the fruit and comparing it to your chamelon 1-7 is already alot.

It is not understood at this time how something like a fruit fly or wax worm metabolise frutose (or other sugars). Since it is the staple of a number of insects' diets you would think that it would be broken down quickly for energy in which case it would not be close to the same thing as direct ingestion of the sugar. Even if it where you would be talking about PPB (parts per billion) not percentage. There are other things to consider when feeding fruits as most have extremely low calcium and high phosphorus. Phosphorus is the most in demand element for photosynethis.

Again I am comparing metabolic process that are understood in a human and comparing them to a chameleon which are yet to be understood all the way. Take what I have wrote for what it is.
 
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connor

New Member
he just ate 2 tiny pices i cut from a strawberry not like a large amount lol they were tiny i just wanted to give him a treat lol;)
 
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