misinformed

karmachameleon

New Member
basically ive been told by the vet i need a male otherwise my female will die and it is solid to find a male the same age as mine but it is important for the life of mine many thanks and im sorry you took it wrong
 
Karma, drop that vet, that is just RIDICULOUS! That vet should be tought a thing or two, or stay away from exotics or at least chameleons!

NO FEMALE WILL DIE BECAUSE SHE ISN'T MATED.

Explain why they said you needed a male.
 
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marxous

New Member
basically ive been told by the vet i need a male otherwise my female will die and it is solid to find a male the same age as mine but it is important for the life of mine many thanks and im sorry you took it wrong

Does this mean that once a female matures, it becomes somewhat necessary to provide a mate and an adequite enclosure for the both of them together to promote longevity?
 

kinyonga

Chameleon Enthusiast
When I first started keeping veileds (well over 10 years ago) I heard that story and as my first two females became sexually mature I debated whether I should mate them or not. I chose not to....just had a feeling that the "story" was untrue. It was a long hard wait until the female was over a year of age and fullgrown and finally mated.

Since then, I have never bred a veiled female under the age of one year. Right now I have a veiled female that is three years old...she has never been mated and never produced an egg. I have two that are even older (over 5) that have never been mated or produced an egg. I have only ever had one veiled that died eggbound and she was mated....but I suspect that she had some physical reproductive problem/reason for not being able to lay the eggs. (Her grandaughter is the three year old one I mentioned above.)

I truly wish this "story" would go away! Generally, from what I have heard, read, etc., eggbinding occurs mostly from improper husbandry or lack of providing an appropriate egglaying site or watching a chameleon repeatedly so that she repeatedly abandons the hole she is digging and eventually loses the urge to dig or sometimes from physical deformities of the reproductive system or sometimes from fused or malformed eggs....so take good care of your chameleon (don't overfeed her but feed her a nutritious balanced diet and keep her at appropriate temperatures, etc.), provide her with a proper place to lay the eggs and chances are you won't have a problem with eggbinding.
 

marxous

New Member
When I first started keeping veileds (well over 10 years ago) I heard that story and as my first two females became sexually mature I debated whether I should mate them or not. I chose not to....just had a feeling that the "story" was untrue. It was a long hard wait until the female was over a year of age and fullgrown and finally mated.

Since then, I have never bred a veiled female under the age of one year. Right now I have a veiled female that is three years old...she has never been mated and never produced an egg. I have two that are even older (over 5) that have never been mated or produced an egg. I have only ever had one veiled that died eggbound and she was mated....but I suspect that she had some physical reproductive problem/reason for not being able to lay the eggs. (Her grandaughter is the three year old one I mentioned above.)

I truly wish this "story" would go away! Generally, from what I have heard, read, etc., eggbinding occurs mostly from improper husbandry or lack of providing an appropriate egglaying site or watching a chameleon repeatedly so that she repeatedly abandons the hole she is digging and eventually loses the urge to dig or sometimes from physical deformities of the reproductive system or sometimes from fused or malformed eggs....so take good care of your chameleon (don't overfeed her but feed her a nutritious balanced diet and keep her at appropriate temperatures, etc.), provide her with a proper place to lay the eggs and chances are you won't have a problem with eggbinding.

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So are you saying that if they are never in teh presence of a male they will never begin to produce eggs?! if this is true, then once they do 'begin' to produce eggs will they continue even in teh absence of a male, or is it only when a male is around?!

Brandy, thanks for the link, i'll check it out when i get home!
 

Brandy

New Member
If they are never in the presence of a male and have a good diet and are not over feed they may not produce eggs nothing is quarenteed though you sould always be prepaired for eggs as this may not work for all females, but it is possible with experience.
 

kinyonga

Chameleon Enthusiast
marxous said..."So are you saying that if they are never in teh presence of a male they will never begin to produce eggs?!"......not exactly. The original question concerned whether an unmated female would die eggbound. I listed the main reasons for eggbinding...but I should have elaborated a little more on what I said. Generally if a veiled female is looked after properly and not overfed, she should have no trouble laying a clutch of infertile eggs (unless there is a physical reason, as I described in the last post).

You said.."once they do 'begin' to produce eggs will they continue even in teh absence of a male, or is it only when a male is around?!"...once they start producing eggs generally they will continue without a male being present...if you continue to look after the female with no changes. The way I keep mine and control their diet, etc., the females don't even produce eggs at all until I "allow" them to by changing things to promote egg production and mating them with the male. Once they have been mated, they can produce more than one fertile or partly fertile clutch without being with the male.

Hope this is a little clearer!
 
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