Melleri rescue

jmart

Member
Just wanted to let you know that the meller's that keeps biting her tail is now at my house. She is in a 4 ft sceen cage away from other chams.
she drank and ate a bit, but could not monitor much more as I have been at work. She falls asleep before I get home, but I think it is from the outside darkness and store hours, lights close earlier. There does not seem to be infection in the tail, but it is shorter.
I weighed her at 140 grams. I am guessing on sex as I see not bulge and there are no spots behind head flaps.
 

Carlton

Chameleon Enthusiast

The spots-behind-earflaps idea hasn't really proved out for melleri. I have had both males and females without spots. They don't usually show much hemipene bulge either. There are other theories on how to sex them but most of the time it still comes down to chance...watch while one defecates...sometimes you will see hemipenes for a moment or two.
 

chams1

Member
The spots-behind-earflaps idea hasn't really proved out for melleri. I have had both males and females without spots. They don't usually show much hemipene bulge either. There are other theories on how to sex them but most of the time it still comes down to chance...watch while one defecates...sometimes you will see hemipenes for a moment or two.

Carlton is correct. I've disproven many theories as to how to sex them. It has been my experience, however, that my confirmed females are bigger than my confirmed males. Knowing that, though, there is no way of knowing how old a WC may be and you cannot really determine its sex based on size alone. You may have a younger melleri and mistake it for being a male just because it may be smaller than one of the others.
 

Carlton

Chameleon Enthusiast
Carlton is correct. I've disproven many theories as to how to sex them. It has been my experience, however, that my confirmed females are bigger than my confirmed males. Knowing that, though, there is no way of knowing how old a WC may be and you cannot really determine its sex based on size alone. You may have a younger melleri and mistake it for being a male just because it may be smaller than one of the others.

I've also noticed my mature adult female was larger in the BODY than the males but that is still pretty subtle and individual. I agree...not reliable enough to use for sexing.
 
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