Mantis Shrimp??

Thehippie

Chameleon Enthusiast
Does anyone here keep saltwater mantis shrimp?? A friend and I are looking into getting a Peacock Mantis Shrimp and would love to hear from some knowledgeable keepers about them!
 

jamest0o0

Chameleon Enthusiast
Literally have a huge one tatted on my calf and an octopus on my knee. Had saltwater for several years and planned on getting a peacock, but never followed through with it. I vaguely remember that they were susceptible to shell rot. They get very big and will murder anything in the tank(which you probably know). Amazing creatures, nothing like them. If you do get one, please share pictures of hin!
 

Thehippie

Chameleon Enthusiast
Literally have a huge one tatted on my calf and an octopus on my knee. Had saltwater for several years and planned on getting a peacock, but never followed through with it. I vaguely remember that they were susceptible to shell rot. They get very big and will murder anything in the tank(which you probably know). Amazing creatures, nothing like them. If you do get one, please share pictures of hin!
lol, I heard about the murder part, apparently they need huge amounts of filtration so I think we're going with a sump filter and a whole lotta live sand and live rock but as of now our knowledge is limited. might be a while but ill definitely share if we end up finding one to purchase!!
 

jamest0o0

Chameleon Enthusiast
So what I would do based off what i remember...

Along with the sump, have a separate bin/bucket/etc with a DSB(deep sand bed) plumbed to the tank so that you can easily replace it. Disturbing a deep sand bed in the DT(display tank) can cause a massive ammonia spike leading to tank crash and the deep sand beds do need replaced eventually, can't remember how long it is though.

Another good idea to add along the sump and DSB would be a refugium. If you're not familiar, this is basically a tank with nutrient absorbing plants like chaeto, mangroves, and other macroalgae with some live rock plumbed(usually gravity fed to the display tank) into the system. Infact after sump, I'd say this is the next most beneficial thing. It will add water volume(good thing), reduce nitrates, and offers beneficial organisms such as copepods and amphipods a place to reproduce.

Of course you'll want a skimmer for the sump and then you can get into other reactors for carbon/GFO/etc....

You want very clear water for invertebrates in saltwater and be careful of copper! Make sure the tank is well establish too. Might be months before a mantis is ready to go in because you want the tank able to handle the waste.
 

Thehippie

Chameleon Enthusiast
So what I would do based off what i remember...

Along with the sump, have a separate bin/bucket/etc with a DSB(deep sand bed) plumbed to the tank so that you can easily replace it. Disturbing a deep sand bed in the DT(display tank) can cause a massive ammonia spike leading to tank crash and the deep sand beds do need replaced eventually, can't remember how long it is though.

Another good idea to add along the sump and DSB would be a refugium. If you're not familiar, this is basically a tank with nutrient absorbing plants like chaeto, mangroves, and other macroalgae with some live rock plumbed(usually gravity fed to the display tank) into the system. Infact after sump, I'd say this is the next most beneficial thing. It will add water volume(good thing), reduce nitrates, and offers beneficial organisms such as copepods and amphipods a place to reproduce.

Of course you'll want a skimmer for the sump and then you can get into other reactors for carbon/GFO/etc....

You want very clear water for invertebrates in saltwater and be careful of copper! Make sure the tank is well establish too. Might be months before a mantis is ready to go in because you want the tank able to handle the waste.
wow!! I didn't even think of a DSB, sounds awesome, ill also definitely look into the refugium to make sure that's done. this is super helpful, thank you so much!!!
 

jamest0o0

Chameleon Enthusiast
wow!! I didn't even think of a DSB, sounds awesome, ill also definitely look into the refugium to make sure that's done. this is super helpful, thank you so much!!!

For sure, good luck. Remember those peacocks get I think over a foot long. They are beasts. Don't get your hand smashed by one lol.
 

absolutbill

Chameleon Enthusiast
I've seen them while scuba diving, but don't ever mess with them. I've heard of them being strong enough to crack the aquarium glass they are in, but don't know if that's an old wive's tale or not. My roommate had one years ago and I remember he tong-fed his after it ate all the damsels in the tank (assholes in their own right, so I wasn't bothered by it). Good luck and post pics if you do this!
 

jamest0o0

Chameleon Enthusiast
I've seen them while scuba diving, but don't ever mess with them. I've heard of them being strong enough to crack the aquarium glass they are in, but don't know if that's an old wive's tale or not. My roommate had one years ago and I remember he tong-fed his after it ate all the damsels in the tank (assholes in their own right, so I wasn't bothered by it). Good luck and post pics if you do this!

Ugh damsels were a nightmare to remove too lol. They're the honey badgers of the fish world.
 

Thehippie

Chameleon Enthusiast
Ugh damsels were a nightmare to remove too lol. They're the honey badgers of the fish world.
lol, well theres the secret, just throw a mantis shrimp in there... boom, no more damsels!!! although your other fish might be in trouble too:unsure::LOL:
 

jamest0o0

Chameleon Enthusiast
lol, well theres the secret, just throw a mantis shrimp in there... boom, no more damsels!!! although your other fish might be in trouble too:unsure::LOL:

I think there are some mantids that will leave somee.... things alone, maybe... but I believe that is the spearers which won't generally go after the CuC. Problem with the thumb smashers is they kill everything, I think fish as well even though they primarily feed on shelled foods. Anything that kills the CuC makes cleaning difficult. And they're so quick, they can probably smack you before you can react. I think I've seen people train them to hand feed though? Not sure I'd want to ever do that, but tongs would be cool.
 

absolutbill

Chameleon Enthusiast
They are ridiculously quick! On my last trip to Bonaire I was spotting them with some regularity, but only would catch a glimpse before they shot backwards into their dens! I can't even begin to think about the levels of patience and dedication you need to film them.
 

radstusky

Avid Member
Years ago, I brought one back from Florida and put it in an aquarium with a whole bunch of other stuff I brought back, including a sargassum fish. One day I came home and noticed water was leaking all over the place and the tank was cracked. I believe it was from the mantid shrimp striking the glass, at least that's the only thing I could see as a possible cause. I ended up putting everything in a 5 gallon bucket, but in the end I lost pretty much everything I had there including the sargassum fish unfortunately. So maybe if you have an acrylic tank you'll fare better! This mantid shrimp wasn't very big, only a couple of inches long.
 
Top Bottom