Jacksons care

yokman

New Member
While there is lots on veilds and panthers I figured I would share this I came across about our horned friends :)

HISTORY:
The Jackson's Chameleon was first described one hundred years ago. The nominate form from Nairobi is called C. jacksonii jacksonii. In 1958, a smaller form was found at Mt. Meru, Tanzania. This sub-species became known as C.j. merumontana. In 1988, the third, and largest subspecies, from Mt. Kenya, East Africa, C. j. xantholophus, was described. In 1972, approximately 36 C. jacksonii xantholophus were exported from Kenya to a pet store in Kaneohe, Hawaii. The store owner released them to recover from stress incurred during shipping. They propagated on the island of Oahu. Due to their survival and reproduction in the Hawaiian islands, the Jackson's Chameleon has the unique distinction of being the only viable, wild populated, old world chameleon in the United States. Kenya stopped exporting Jackson's in 1981, but Hawaii legalized their collection for the mainland pet trade in 1984. Virtually all Jackson's sold in the U.S. since 1984 come from the Hawaiian strain of C. jacksonii xantholophus. Recent reports indicate wild populations have been established in California, Texas and parts of Florida.

BEHAVIOR:
Jackson's are usually calm, placid animals in comparison to other chameleons. Males, however, are very territorial and will fight another male to defend his perch or his female. A male will use his horns to stage shoving contests with his rival. This horn-locking display of dominance rarely results in injury other than in the pride of the loser.Chameleons are known to be masters of camouflage. They have a highly sophisticated and complex ability to vary their skin pigments. Thus they are able to change their color and patterns. They are also capable of laterally flattening their sides, making themselves look like a leaf on a tree or elongating their bodies alongside a branch or twig to blend in. Jackson’s are arboreal (tree-dwelling) in nature and have adapted a specialized tongue to capture food. The chameleon's long muscular tongue can rapidly catapult from his mouth to a length of up to 1½ times its body length. The tip of the tongue is like a moist suction cup that attaches to the prey and then retracts. This is accomplished in less than half of one second.The Jackson Chameleon has fused, pincher-like feet with opposable toes and a prehensile tail, enabling him to be an excellent climber and insect hunter. Important note: The old world chameleon's tail, unlike the American Chameleon or Anole, cannot regenerate if lost or broken. Jackson Chameleons, like all old world chameleons, have binocular vision. Their eyes move independently of each other and in any direction enabling them to see two things at once with a 360° field of view. They possess excellent vision comparing to a 100mm - 150mm telephoto lens.Most chameleons are anti-social, preferring to live alone. In the wild individuals are well dispersed, and are rarely seen in pairs or groups. Jackson's Chameleons are one of the few chameleons that generally can be kept in pairs or trios. Under no circumstances can two adult males share the same cage. Chameleons placed in pairs or trios should be observed closely for signs of stress and separated if necessary.

CAPTIVE ENVIRONMENT:
The environmental needs, to successfully maintain Jackson's Chameleons in captivity, are simple yet very important. The Jackson is a true Montane species, hailing from a climate of temperate days (74° - 80°F) and cool nights (57° - 65°F). A night time drop of 10°-15° is recommended to stimulate your pet's appetite. A basking area of 76°-80°F is desirable for a few hours daily, if the ambient temperature seldom rises above 70°F. Please note that a constant or minimal variation in temperature will eventually compromise the chameleon's health. Extended periods of cool nights, without the benefit of warm periods during daytime, may result in respiratory disease. Excessive daytime temperatures, however, will result in heat stress and gaping mouth. Temperatures more than 90°F, for any significant period, will prove to be fatal.Equally important to temperature fluctuations, is the need for plenty of air circulation and movement. The ideal terrarium for these highland species should be constructed primarily of screen. Glass aquariums are not suitable for Jackson's older than neonates. The screening material should be an anodized aluminum, pre-coated wire or plastic structure netting. Bare aluminum or fiberglass screen is not recommended. The mesh should be a minimum of 20x20 micron, and preferably 1/16 inch. This size mesh will insure the containment of feed insects, but allow for the chameleon's climbing on the screen without doing harm to their claws. An aluminum framing is preferable to wood. Wood frames, kept at high humidity, will harbor mold and eventually promote fungal bacterial growth. The old adage "bigger is better" holds true for chameleon cages. You should provide your pet with the largest enclosure price and space permits. The minimum enclosure for 1-2 Jacksons measures 24"L x 24"H x 18"W. The interior of the cage should contain non-toxic live and/or plastic plants and a number of branches of varying circumferences. Live plants such as Ficus benjamina, Gardenia, Jade, Pothos, Schefflera, Snake plants and Swedish ivy have been successfully used. Carefully wash plant leaves to rid them of any pesticides. Branches should be placed at all angles, horizontally and vertically. Make sure branches are taken from trees that have not been sprayed or treated with pesticides. Check branches for mites or other pests.

FOOD & SUPPLEMENTATIONS:
Offer your Jackson's Chameleon a wide variety of insects. Ideally your chameleon should be offered a different food item each day. Rotating the type of insects offered will benefit your chameleon physically and psychologically. Physically due to the different nutrients found in various insects. Psychologically, capturing different prey every day will preventive boredom. Types of insects should include: crickets, super worms (Zoophobas), regular meal worms (tenibrio), butter worms, wax worms, roaches, grasshoppers, snails and the common house fly. It is extremely important to "nutrient load" or "gut load" (See LIHS Care Sheet #14). I recommend calcium supplementation with each feeding for juveniles up to the age of six months and gravid females. Sub-adult and adult Jackson's can receive the supplement 2-3 times weekly. An excellent vitamin/mineral supplement is Rep-Cal® Herptivite™ multivitamins. It contains preformed Vitamin A. Man-made or preformed Vitamin A is thought by many experts to cause edema and liver degeneration in chameleons. Herptivite™ contains the anti-oxidant beta carotene, which is naturally converted into usable vitamin A by chameleons. I recommend vitamin supplementation once a week. Over vitamization can be just as dangerous as using no vitamins.

WATER:
Jackson's Chameleons, like most species, have substantial water requirements. Like most Chameleons, Jackson's usually will not drink standing water from a bowl. Rather they need simulated rain or dew as found in nature. This can be accomplished in two ways: By spraying the plants and leaves with a plant misting spray bottle, or by using an overhead drip system. The easiest (and most economical drip system is to place a plastic deli cup with a pin-hole in the bottom, over a plant and add a small amount of water. The water will drip through the screen top, onto the plant. This motion will be quickly noticed by your pet, who will run to lap water droplets from the leaves. This can be done once or twice a day. Your plants will be watered at the same time. If using plastic plants, be sure to place a similar sized deli cup at the base of the plant to gather the drops that run down the plant. Empty the water-collection container as soon as possible. Misting the plants once or twice each day is also recommended. I let tap water age at least 24 hours in an open gallon jar to allow the chlorine to escape.

LIGHTING:
All chameleons need some exposure to sunlight. Jackson's particularly need the sun's unfiltered rays which provide UV radiation necessary for the synthesis of Vitamin D3 and absorption of calcium and other minerals. Ultraviolet radiation (UV Rays) will change frequency when passed through glass or plastic. A chameleon placed by a closed window will not benefit from these filtered rays. While exposure to natural unfiltered sunlight is best for your chameleon, it is not always possible. The next best solution is to provide your chameleon with full-spectrum fluorescent lighting. Full spectrum fluorescent bulbs (See LIHS Care Sheet #11) provide both UVA and UVB rays needed by the chameleon. The bulbs should be placed as close to the top of the cage as possible without touching the screen. Bulbs resting on aluminum screen will have a shortened useful life. Bulbs placed at distances greater than 12" will provide little benefit to the chameleon. Full spectrum lighting should be provided 10-14 hours daily. It is important to note, that, while full spectrum bulbs may continue to light, the potency of UVA and UVB rays greatly diminishes with age. It is recommended that bulbs be changed every 6 to 9 months, depending on total hours of use. Remember, when the opportunity is present, allow your chameleon to be exposed to natural, unfiltered sunlight. Be mindful, however, of temperature extremes. Always provide shaded areas for your pet. Your chameleon will thank you for it.
 

yokman

New Member
REPRODUCTION:

Jackson's Chameleons are ovoviparious (live bearing). The female can have between 6 and 40+ live young, with numbers in the low teens being the norm. Depending on genetics, diet and overall health, Jackson's reach sexual maturity between six and ten months with males reaching maturity first. Most breeders introduce the female into the male's cage. A receptive female will usually remain all green or grayish green and will allow the male to approach her. He will court her by displaying his mast brilliant colors, puffing up his body and by bobbing his head. If the female still shows signs of receptivity, the male moves up from behind and mounts her. Copulation usually lasts from 5 to 20 minutes. The pair may be left together to repeat breeding, as long as the female shows receptive colors and no signs of stress. Gestation period is between 5 and 10 months depending on such factors as temperature, season, age and health of the female. The female will develop a huge appetite until the last stage of gravidity. Increased calcium supplementation is crucial during this period to aid in the development of the embryos. A couple of weeks before birth, the female's appetite will steadily decrease due to the growing embryos displacing her internal organs. One to two days before giving birth, the female will stop eating altogether and roam throughout the cage restlessly. Birth usually occurs during early morning.


ILLNESS & DISEASE:

Chameleons are known to be masters at camouflage. This is especially true when it comes to sickness. The chameleon can hide its illness well. It is important to know your animal and monitor it on a daily basis. Observe your pet's food and water intake, coloration, alertness, droppings, and overall behavior. Keep records of his weight on a regular basis. Most importantly, consult your veterinarian at the first sign of change. Old world chameleons are susceptible to various internal and external parasites, infections and stress which can compromise his life. Parasites can be present in both wild-caught and captive-bred species. Some internal parasites are naturally present and are part of the chameleons' fauna. Treatment should always be left to an experienced veterinarian who specializes in reptiles, or a qualified herpetologist. Your pet should be checked by a qualified veterinarian initially, and at regular intervals. A fecal examination is highly recommended. Keep your pet well fed and watered. Keep his cage and cage ornaments clean. Observe proper temperature requirements. Prevention is easier than a cure. In the wild, Jackson's are more prone to disease, infections, predators and at times inadequate diet and undesirable temperatures. Their life expectancy in nature is 2-4 years. With proper husbandry and diet Jackson's Chameleon in captivity can be expected to live from 5 to 8 years. There are reports of some Jackson's reaching the ripe old age of 11-12 years.
 

Carlton

Chameleon Enthusiast
BEHAVIOR:
Jackson's are usually calm, placid animals in comparison to other chameleons. FOOD & SUPPLEMENTATIONS:
I recommend vitamin supplementation once a week. Over vitamization can be just as dangerous as using no vitamins.

WATER:
This can be accomplished in two ways: By spraying the plants and leaves with a plant misting spray bottle, or by using an overhead drip system. The easiest (and most economical drip system is to place a plastic deli cup with a pin-hole in the bottom, over a plant and add a small amount of water. The
Some items from the article I don't agree with...a bit outdated.

I don't consider jackson's "calm, placid" compared to other chams. They just demonstrate their stress in different ways. They may not show aggression like a veiled or panther, but they ARE just as easily stressed! They just tend to hide, are reactive and shy instead.

Supplementing with a herp vitamin once a week is too much. Try once a month.

Depending on your local climate, using a dripper only won't keep a cage humid enough. How many times do we hear of someone's jax becoming seriously dehydrated if only the classic dripper is used? Also, dripping a "small amount" of water each day is misleading. You'll be going through a LOT of water!

Just my opinion.
 

yokman

New Member
I also agree with you. I just wanted to get "sum" info out there as I been seing alot of jacsons with problems as of late and with them being "different" then the panthers and veilds I thought this was a good start. So by all means input is MORE then welcome to keep the jacksons alive and strong. I use muti vitimans 1 time a month and calcium with d3 1 time a month and calcium about every other day to ever 3 days or so.I am not a big fan of the drippers myself as I still need a good drainage system so I just hand spray several times a day. IDK about the stress as they all are different and mind dosent seem to mind muck of anything I do or whats around her.
 

Ace

Avid Member
so you can keep a male and female jackson in the same cage?
no...the male will stress out the female and they can mate without you knowing it...

in the long run, keep them seperate is best to keep them happy heaalthy and long lived
 

yokman

New Member
You CAN keep them togher but I wouldn't put 2 males and a female togher as they will fight for her. Jacksons do fine with other jacksons but I would keep them in seperate cages as it will help keep them healthier. And shoot,who cares if they make babies as they bare live little ones that are VERY cute:D
 

Incognito

New Member
My breeder suggested me taking a female and a male when I only went in for 1 male, he said the female was being bullied by all the others but seemed to have paired off with the male I had chosen. And that he was the only one who tollerated and even protected her... I dunno, I'm still new to this :) Hoping that they stay getting along
 

Cainschams

New Member
She was Free
Well then thats not to bad, is it?:D

Although, I highly doubt the female "paired of with your male" but getting bullied definitely. Its best just to keep them separate especially if the girl was getting bullied. She will probably enjoy not having to compete for food, basking site or any territory. If you do keep them together watch closely for any dominance displayed by either or. If one is spending time hiding in a corner, constantly on the ground, not wandering around the cage, basking, eating etc you need to separate immediately.

http://chameleonnews.com/10JulManchen.html
 

kmgcantswim

New Member
i was just wondering cause i was seriously considering passably getting a male and female jackson and breeding them. i was thinking about getting a huge cage for the both of them but if not ill have to get two smaller cages
 

tabbi

New Member
This was very helpful, I think I may be on the right track. If anybody has first hand experience with gravid Jacksons I call out to you please help!!!!!! I purchased two females on July 26th and a few days later found out that one was indeed gravid. I am new to chameleons, definitely was not planning on having babies. I am so lost
 
Getting a Jackson

Hey I am getting a chameleon and I plan on keeping the cage next
to a window. Do Jackson's enjoy and open window or do they prefer a darker room?
 

mnlwfan

Member
Hey I am getting a chameleon and I plan on keeping the cage next
to a window. Do Jackson's enjoy and open window or do they prefer a darker room?
My Jackson's enclosure is next to a window and she loves looking out the window. When weather permits, I leave the window open so she gets fresh outside air and a little unfiltered, indirect sunlight.
 

Djturna4thakidz

Established Member
You CAN keep them togher but I wouldn't put 2 males and a female togher as they will fight for her. Jacksons do fine with other jacksons but I would keep them in seperate cages as it will help keep them healthier. And shoot,who cares if they make babies as they bare live little ones that are VERY cute:D
I do not agree with this statement. Individuals should be separated no matter what.
 
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