Infertile gravid

chameleonneeds

Avid Member
Hey both my female Veileds have very distinct blue and orange spots sometimes they will go dark green does this mean that they are receptive or are starting to get infertile clutches, they havent laid before and are 1 year 5mnths dont know why theyr only receptive or have infertile clutches.
 

Tygerr

Avid Member
It's quite possible that they are carrying infertile clutches. Have you been monitoring their weight?

My female is still recovering after laying a clutch of infertile eggs last week.
During the period she was working on the eggs she displayed receptive colours but never displayed the darker gravid colouration that is typical for Veileds. The most conclusive sign that she was carrying eggs was her dramatic increase in weight. Just before laying she weighed over 80g more than she did after dropping the eggs - a little more than the weight of my older and much larger male. Towards the end, she was noticeably 'stuffed' full of eggs (bloated look, not able to flatten herself).

If you suspect at all that they may be working on eggs make sure that you have containers in their cages filled with clean soil where they can lay their eggs. For more info on a suitable egg-laying container see this post: https://www.chameleonforums.com/what-expect-next-9066/#post71162

Also, it is very important to increase their calcium supplementation if you suspect that they are working on eggs. Laying a clutch of eggs is very draining on them, and will reduce the levels of all sorts of nutrients in their body, the most critical of which is calcium.

Once they have laid an infertile clutch, I would recommend a visit to the vet. It is quite likely that not all the eggs are laid in one 'sitting', especially if it is a large clutch. In order to prevent a condition of egg-binding from developing, the vet might need to administer medication to encourage any retained eggs out. He would probably also prescribe a dose/s of calcium to regain her calcium levels.
 

Brad Ramsey

Retired Moderator
Once they have laid an infertile clutch, I would recommend a visit to the vet. It is quite likely that not all the eggs are laid in one 'sitting', especially if it is a large clutch. In order to prevent a condition of egg-binding from developing, the vet might need to administer medication to encourage any retained eggs out. He would probably also prescribe a dose/s of calcium to regain her calcium levels.
I'm not sure it's "quite likely" that all eggs would not be laid in one sitting, regardless of clutch size.
I know this happens, but I don't think it's all that common.
In cases that I have been made aware of, it's pretty obvious that something is wrong when all the eggs are not laid. Appetite does not resume and anxious behavior (pacing, etc.) continues.
It's very important that when the digging begins, the female not be disturbed for as long as it takes her to complete the tunnel and lay her clutch.
Females who do not feel that they have chosen a safe spot, may abandon the project, and being unable to travel to a new location, can retain the eggs and become egg bound.

-Brad
 

Tygerr

Avid Member
I'm not sure it's "quite likely" that all eggs would not be laid in one sitting, regardless of clutch size.
I know this happens, but I don't think it's all that common.
In cases that I have been made aware of, it's pretty obvious that something is wrong when all the eggs are not laid. Appetite does not resume and anxious behavior (pacing, etc.) continues.
Fair enough - I have no idea what the likelihood of that occurring is. It happened with my female, and from the reading up I've done subsequently, it often seems to coincide with large, infertile clutches. But I guess there are a lot of infertile clutches being laid where nothing goes wrong, so it would be impossible to deduce what the actual correlation is...

Anyway, before I stray off-topic:
the key lesson I learnt from the experience with my female's infertile clutch is that you have to be extra vigilant of the female's behaviour and condition from the moment you suspect that she is carrying eggs and even until after she has actually laid the eggs. That doesn't mean constantly watching her (as Brad mentioned, she needs privacy to lay successfully), but make sure you're prepared for any of the eventualities, because females are at their most vulnerable during egg production and laying. It might be the time she needs you most.
 

chameleonneeds

Avid Member
Hey Brad her colours are like that but lighter blue spots orange is there and the dark green she gets sometimes.
I checked their weight last night 1 was +-80 and the other was 60-70 is that normal?
 

Brad Ramsey

Retired Moderator
Again, it sounds like receptive coloration to me.
Normal weight is totally subjective ... what to do now is check their weight every few days and see if they are gaining.
There are other clues that they are cycling eggs which have been mentioned already in this thread.

-Brad
 
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