how do you Sex baby t.j.jacksonii?

jojothefirst

New Member
Xanth females generally have no horns and meru females generally have none or one.
But t.j.jacksonii females have 3 so I have researched how to tell males and females apart as babies and can not get a good answer.
At what age are males horns obviously bigger than the females?
Can they be sexed in the same way as panthers by looking at the base of there tail?
Would be awesome if anyone could show me some pics of baby or young T.J jacksonii.
Thanks in advance.
 

JoeG

New Member
It was difficult to tell them apart when they are very young. When I raised mine, the females horns developed more slowly than the males, thinner & shorter even into adulthood. I kept a clutch of 7 together for 6 months before seperating them & at that point I was certain that I had 3.4 The males in a group setting are characteristically more dominant towards the females resulting in more aggressive eating habits,therefore growing faster as well. Their horns are the best way to tell them apart when they are very young as they grow longer & thicker than the females. Later on you'll see differences in coloration & body stature. The males at this point started to have a lighter coloration & longer, leaner appearance before they thickened up into adults , where the females had a more mottled coloration & kept a more robust appearance as juveniles. I hope this answers your question. Let me know if you have any others & good luck with them.
 

jojothefirst

New Member
Thank you for your reply... I have 3 which are ment to be 3 females but 1 is a bit bigger than the other 2 and eating more like you have said males can do . It looks like that 1 might have a bigger bulge as well but I dont know if this is a way of telling gender in jacksons like it is with panthers.
Anybody know for sure if this can be away of sexing them?
They are around 4 months old.

It was difficult to tell them apart when they are very young. When I raised mine, the females horns developed more slowly than the males, thinner & shorter even into adulthood. I kept a clutch of 7 together for 6 months before seperating them & at that point I was certain that I had 3.4 The males in a group setting are characteristically more dominant towards the females resulting in more aggressive eating habits,therefore growing faster as well. Their horns are the best way to tell them apart when they are very young as they grow longer & thicker than the females. Later on you'll see differences in coloration & body stature. The males at this point started to have a lighter coloration & longer, leaner appearance before they thickened up into adults , where the females had a more mottled coloration & kept a more robust appearance as juveniles. I hope this answers your question. Let me know if you have any others & good luck with them.
 
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