Hi I'm new

aquariumart

New Member
Hi. I'm a future ambilobe owner. I want one and am trying to learn first, as I did with my darts. So any advice or shared knowledge is welcome. I'll be reading and learning,

Thanks Debbie
 

Vegas Chad

Avid Member
Welcome to the forum! Look through all the old post's and you can kick up just about anything... And if you cant find it then post a new one and we will all help you best we can. Best of luck to ya!
 

PukaKeha

New Member
You have come to the right place. I dont think Ive ever seen a question that somebody somewhere didnt know the answer to. Welcome.
 
Its always an absolute pleasure to greet a new member, such as your self! I hope any, and all info. that you do/will seek will be given!


thanks,
-Jake
 

aquariumart

New Member
Thanks for the welcome and links. I have been trying the search engine but I must not type the right words. Because I get so much and it takes forever to weed through it.

I get the basking area, lighting, and type of enclosure needed. What temperature range?

I already have a misting system. What humidity? I understand how they drink.

I raise crickets, fruitflies, and mealworms. So that leaves superworms.

I am wondering about an outside cage part time during the right season. My yard is secure and I would build a very sturdy cage so animals could not get in. Any issues with this idea?

I have ideas on the correct answers to my questions but I'ld like to hear it from other owners. Just to make sure that I am getting it.

Thanks, Debbie
 

pohchunyee

Avid Member
Welcome. Just Post any question you have and someone will get to you (maybe more). A lot of us have been working with chameleon for a while and are willing to give help and hints to new owner.:D
 

kinyonga

Chameleon Enthusiast
You said..."I get the basking area, lighting, and type of enclosure needed. What temperature range?"...the basking area for an adult panther can be in the mid to high 80'sF but for a hatchling I would keep it more moderate (low 80'sF) because their small bodies overheat and dehydrate more quickly than an adult's. (I actually don't use a basking light on babies....I have a double florescent and that seems to be warm enough since they are in my reptile room.) I keep the ambient temperature in the cages in the high 70's to low 80's.

You said..."I already have a misting system. What humidity? I understand how they drink"...moderate humidity is okay if you make sure that you keep them well hydrated. Mine drink readily and lots from a dripper and will drink drops from plant leaves when I mist the cages too.

You said..."I raise crickets, fruitflies, and mealworms. So that leaves superworms"...I have a "colony" of superworms in my turtle cage...so they aren't hard to raise!

You said..."I am wondering about an outside cage part time during the right season. My yard is secure and I would build a very sturdy cage so animals could not get in. Any issues with this idea?"...just be sure that the chameleon has a place to get out of the sun inside the cage. (Don't use glass on the cage because you could end up with a "greenhouse affect" and "bake" your panther.) Its important to keep them well-hydrated when then are outside too. If your chameleon is getting exposure to UVB from the sunlight, you will likely have to adjust the amount of vitamin D3 its getting in supplements...or even cut it out all together. There may be other issues that I haven't mentioned/thought of....I don't keep mine outside in cages.
 

aquariumart

New Member
Thank you for the reply Kinyonga. That was what I needed.

Very similar to my frog temps. I am putting the enclosure in there.

Sounds like a misting and drip system would be best. My husband is a plumber and we have figured out a way to build a cage with a drain. This will help keep it free from bacteria.

I also have a misting system around my patio. I was thinking the outside cage could set under the patio. I will have to do some research on the UVB exposure. This may be a fantasy because I know they do not like being handled. And switching cages could stress him. Guess that will depend on the cham.

Debbie
 

Brad Ramsey

Retired Moderator
Debbie,

A lot of us take our Chams out in the sun for natural UVB exposure.
When we talk about handling and stress .... we're talking about taking the cham out every day...multiple times a day..playing with it etc. these are generally practices to be avoided in the keeping of these animals.
Moving him from one enclosure to another 2 or 3 times a week and leaving him (basically) alone in both places is different, and in my opinion the benefits of getting to be outside far outweigh any minor stress involved.

-Brad
 

UnClearThought

New Member
Outside??

Hi brad.
I see that in the post you talk about bringing your chams outside. Ive been told not to handle them much cause that causes stress. I would have though it would be better for them?? Now when outside, do you just put your guy in a plant??? I would love to take mine outside but nervos with the stress level.
Anythoughts?
 

Brad Ramsey

Retired Moderator
As I mentioned ...occasional trips outside are beneficial.
I use a smaller screen enclosure for outside...they can disappear fast if left free on a tree or plant.
Make sure part of the enclosure is well shaded and that you take the misting bottle out if it's really hot.
I usually start outside time with a long mist shower and leave him out (again with access to shade) for a couple of hours.
It makes them so happy and energized and nothing beats the sun for UVB!
The stress it may cause, if any, is shortlived and in my opinion hardly worth mentioning. He's happy when he's outside, he's happy to go back to his home inside and the trips back and forth are short.
That being said, I do not condone excessive handling of these animals. They want to be left alone and like to believe that they're invisible....so the rest of the time that's how it is.

-Brad
 
Top Bottom