Hello, Chameleon loverssss :)

MarcuslovesSusan

New Member
So, we are a couple, hence the name lol & we are also new parents to a slightly different type of child; a hopefully soon-to-be, colorful, baby blue ambilobe panther chameleon :)

He (we think ha) is about 3 months old, and we are quite original naming him... SOBE haha
HE is soooo cute, like everyone thinks their kid is, right? lol but really...
!!We are turning into Chameleon nerds!!
haha
0.0

I was wondering if any of you have any tips as far as raising him; tricks that you may have learned with experience?? We've read a lot on the basics, but things you may be able to teach us outside the box ha are definitely appreciated!
 

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DeviousMike

New Member
Sticking to the basics what makes you a successful keeper. I'm fairly new and I try things that make life easier, like an automatic mister. I've found the significance of tracking weight to track their growth. But this because I have a female and I am trying to determine how much she gains during egg production. My last "outside the box" thing is that I give them some time to free range. For one of my chams, it has a soothing effect as he is a biter.

Anyways, these are a few things that aren't really written in general guides. None are necessary, but each is beneficial in their own right.
 

jessica

Avid Member
Sobe is a cutie, so little I actually had to look for him!

Congratulations and welcome to the forum and the addiction. This place is a plethora of information read up :D
 

Kansascity

New Member
Welcome,
There are many informative successful Cham keepers here I am new as well, but you have a real little cutie on your hands!
 

kinyonga

Chameleon Queen
Here's some information about chameleon husbandry with some links at the bottom that you might be interested in...

Exposure to proper UVB, appropriate temperatures, supplements, a supply of well-fed/gutloaded insects, water and an appropriate cage set-up are all important for the well-being of your chameleon.

Appropriate cage temperatures aid in digestion and thus play a part indirectly in nutrient absorption. For a hatchling veiled I keep the cage temperatures more even in the low to mid 80'sF...but for male veileds that are about 5 months old the basking temperature can be in the mid to high 80'sF during the day.

Exposure to UVB from either direct sunlight or a proper UVB light allows the chameleon to produce D3 so that it can use the calcium in its system to make/keep the bones strong and be used in other systems in the chameleon as well. The UVB should not pass through glass or plastic no matter whether its from the sun or the UVB light. The most often recommended UVB light is the long linear fluorescent Repti-sun 5.0 tube light. Some of the compacts, spirals and tube lights have caused health issues, but so far there have been no bad reports against this one.

Since many of the feeder insects have a poor ratio of calcium to phosphorus in them, its important to dust the insects just before you feed them to the chameleon at most feedings with a phos.-free calcium powder to help make up for it. (I use Rep-cal phosphorus-free calcium).

If you also dust twice a month with a phos.-free calcium/D3 powder it will ensure that your chameleon gets some D3 without overdoing it. It leaves the chameleon to produce the rest of what it needs through its exposure to the UVB light. D3 from supplements can build up in the system but D3 produced from exposure to UVB shouldn't as long as the chameleon can move in and out of it. (I use Rep-cal phos.-free calcium/D3).

Dusting twice a month as well with a vitamin powder that contains a beta carotene (prOformed) source of vitamin A will ensure that the chameleon gets some vitamins without the danger of overdosing the vitamin A. PrEformed sources of vitamin A can build up in the system and may prevent the D3 from doing its job and push the chameleon towards MBD. However, there is controversy as to whether all/any chameleons can convert the beta carotene and so some people give some prEformed vitamin A once in a while. (I use herptivite.)

Gutloading/feeding the insects well helps to provide what the chameleon needs. I gutload crickets, roaches, locusts, superworms, etc. with an assortment of greens (dandelions, kale, collards, endive, escarole, mustard greens, etc.) and veggies (carrots, squash, sweet potato, sweet red pepper, zucchini, etc.)

Calcium, phos., D3 and vitamin A are important players in bone health and other systems in the chameleon (muscles, etc.) and they need to be in balance. When trying to balance them, you need to look at the supplements, what you feed the insects and what you feed the chameleon.

Here are some good sites for you to read...
http://chameleonnews.com/07FebWheelock.html
http://web.archive.org/web/200605020...Vitamin.A.html
http://web.archive.org/web/200406080...d.Calcium.html
http://www.uvguide.co.uk/
http://raisingkittytheveiledchameleon.blogspot.com/
http://web.archive.org/web/200601140...ww.adcham.com/
 

MarcuslovesSusan

New Member
Sticking to the basics what makes you a successful keeper. I'm fairly new and I try things that make life easier, like an automatic mister. I've found the significance of tracking weight to track their growth. But this because I have a female and I am trying to determine how much she gains during egg production. My last "outside the box" thing is that I give them some time to free range. For one of my chams, it has a soothing effect as he is a biter.

Anyways, these are a few things that aren't really written in general guides. None are necessary, but each is beneficial in their own right.

Thank you :)

Where do you usually let your cham have free range time? Our guy is still pretty small, but we have just been taking him on his hibiscus outside for a couple hours a day--- with supervision haha Definitely!

How often does your auto mister mist the cage?? We have been doing hand misting so far. How much did yours cost?

again, thanks a bunch for the ideasss!!!
 

MarcuslovesSusan

New Member
Sobe is a cutie, so little I actually had to look for him!

Congratulations and welcome to the forum and the addiction. This place is a plethora of information read up :D

haha, I know he is literally like a gram in weight! super small. Thanks for the warm welcome!!!!

I'm def going to put close up pics asap!!
 
Hi!, and welcome.
Check out the site sponsers, AquaZamp and Mistking for misters. They are in the 100.00 range and really worth it.
My mister is set for every 2 hours for 1 min. I hand mist as well and use a dripper. They are kinda ugly but a must.
I also give my 4mo Panther a warm shower once or twice a day. He seems to really like it.
I am different than some because I handle my guy alot, he spends alot of time with me, both inside and out. He's just so cool and likes to chill.
Most of my info came from my breeder at Kammerflage Kreations. So I do what she tells me and a little trial and well, so far no errors!
Enjoy!
 

MarcuslovesSusan

New Member
Thank you, KANSASCITY

I just realized I can just click reply and not quote what everyone says to reply haha

What type of Cham do you have??

:)
 

MarcuslovesSusan

New Member
Aww! Way cool :) We have done a sauna like thing with him 2x... using warm, wet paper towels in a little, lidded enclosure with holes for like 10-15 min... He seemed to respond well!

Anywho, thanks a bunch for the tips!!
 

MarcuslovesSusan

New Member
Here's some information about chameleon husbandry with some links at the bottom that you might be interested in...

Exposure to proper UVB, appropriate temperatures, supplements, a supply of well-fed/gutloaded insects, water and an appropriate cage set-up are all important for the well-being of your chameleon.

Appropriate cage temperatures aid in digestion and thus play a part indirectly in nutrient absorption. For a hatchling veiled I keep the cage temperatures more even in the low to mid 80'sF...but for male veileds that are about 5 months old the basking temperature can be in the mid to high 80'sF during the day.

Exposure to UVB from either direct sunlight or a proper UVB light allows the chameleon to produce D3 so that it can use the calcium in its system to make/keep the bones strong and be used in other systems in the chameleon as well. The UVB should not pass through glass or plastic no matter whether its from the sun or the UVB light. The most often recommended UVB light is the long linear fluorescent Repti-sun 5.0 tube light. Some of the compacts, spirals and tube lights have caused health issues, but so far there have been no bad reports against this one.

Since many of the feeder insects have a poor ratio of calcium to phosphorus in them, its important to dust the insects just before you feed them to the chameleon at most feedings with a phos.-free calcium powder to help make up for it. (I use Rep-cal phosphorus-free calcium).

If you also dust twice a month with a phos.-free calcium/D3 powder it will ensure that your chameleon gets some D3 without overdoing it. It leaves the chameleon to produce the rest of what it needs through its exposure to the UVB light. D3 from supplements can build up in the system but D3 produced from exposure to UVB shouldn't as long as the chameleon can move in and out of it. (I use Rep-cal phos.-free calcium/D3).

Dusting twice a month as well with a vitamin powder that contains a beta carotene (prOformed) source of vitamin A will ensure that the chameleon gets some vitamins without the danger of overdosing the vitamin A. PrEformed sources of vitamin A can build up in the system and may prevent the D3 from doing its job and push the chameleon towards MBD. However, there is controversy as to whether all/any chameleons can convert the beta carotene and so some people give some prEformed vitamin A once in a while. (I use herptivite.)

Gutloading/feeding the insects well helps to provide what the chameleon needs. I gutload crickets, roaches, locusts, superworms, etc. with an assortment of greens (dandelions, kale, collards, endive, escarole, mustard greens, etc.) and veggies (carrots, squash, sweet potato, sweet red pepper, zucchini, etc.)

Calcium, phos., D3 and vitamin A are important players in bone health and other systems in the chameleon (muscles, etc.) and they need to be in balance. When trying to balance them, you need to look at the supplements, what you feed the insects and what you feed the chameleon.

Here are some good sites for you to read...
http://chameleonnews.com/07FebWheelock.html
http://web.archive.org/web/200605020...Vitamin.A.html
http://web.archive.org/web/200406080...d.Calcium.html
http://www.uvguide.co.uk/
http://raisingkittytheveiledchameleon.blogspot.com/
http://web.archive.org/web/200601140...ww.adcham.com/

Wow,
thank you soo much :)

In terms of the food, we have only used crickets thus far since hes so young, but we do gutload them. We also use 2 diff dusting supplements; one with every feeding, calcium-mineral supplement, and the herptivite- beta carotene 1xevery week.


He seems to be doing well. The only hiccups we've had is he favors his L eye over the R. Ohhhh, and do you happen to know if it is normal for a cham to nap during the day? Especially after feeding?

Thanks.


THANKS!
 

kaylie

New Member
He seems to be doing well. The only hiccups we've had is he favors his L eye over the R. Ohhhh, and do you happen to know if it is normal for a cham to nap during the day? Especially after feeding?

Chameleons are not supposed to nap during the day. What do you mean he "favors" one eye over the other? As in closes one or just moves one more than the other?
Also, use the multivitamin only once or twice a month, calcium with D3 twice a month, and regular calcium without D3 for the rest of the feedings.

By the way, I do not use a misting system, but a homemade rain system I found on another thread, and I love it. Parts were half the cost of a misting system, around $50. Just depends on your preference. Here's the link. https://www.chameleonforums.com/my-own-rain-system-50100/ If you go with this, I'd recommend using the smallest drill bit you can. Using the tacks to make the holes is a pain and not as effective.
 
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