Furcifer labordi

TreelionsUK

New Member
Hello just wonder if any lucky people have kept/bred Furcifer labordi??Mr anderson??
Would love to find out a bit more info on them and some images would be excellent!!
 
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Kent67

Retired Moderator
Of the people I know who were able to get them back in the day, I always heard they were very secretive and difficult to establish. They were also very rarely imported up to the suspension in 1994. I wanted to try them back then but didn't have the cage space the one time I saw them for sale in person. There's some cool male/female labordi footage in The Living Edens: Madagascar special. It's a very well produced film if you haven't seen it. There's a bunch of copies on Ebay now too.
 

Kent67

Retired Moderator
Wow! They had wild caught labordi for sale?? I've heard that the suspended Malagasy species are much more readily available in Europe, but do they just openly sell smuggled animals at the shows? What else have you seen available?
 

TreelionsUK

New Member
I have a list..this is from last time tho


Calumma
parsonii £600
parsonii cristifer £950globifer £350.-
oshaughnessyi £900.-
nasuta £180.-

Furcifer
lebordi £550.-
balteatus £900.-
bifidus £900.-
minor £190.-
willisii £220.-
campani £150.-
brivicornis £550.-
antinema £550
 

Dr Cameraman

New Member
I have a list..this is from last time tho


Calumma
parsonii £600
parsonii cristifer £950globifer £350.-
oshaughnessyi £900.-
nasuta £180.-

Furcifer
lebordi £550.-
balteatus £900.-
bifidus £900.-
minor £190.-
willisii £220.-
campani £150.-
brivicornis £550.-
antinema £550
Do you know if these animals are legally imported from Madagascar or not. I'm not sure if it's the same in the states.
 

Kent67

Retired Moderator
:eek:

That is unbelievable! I had no idea it was like that.... So, any idea how they get there? Does Germany just not enforce international wildlife laws? It is a CITES member country, after all. Is it that export permits list them as Chamaeleo labordi, rather than Furcifer labordi which is restricted and the agents checking imports don't know they're the same? Even if they were not imported through the proper channels, there is no way people would sell those species in public here, like at a show, because of US Fish and Wildlife.

I would think the prices would serve as a good indicator as to whether or not they were legally imported. Well, this has me all fired up so I'm gonna start a new thread....
 

Colin

New Member
I have been to Hamm the last 8 years,never missed a show. I have NEVER EVER seen one of the listed chams,and I am there early before opening doors,when only breeders are there.Now and then you can get a parsonii,globifer ,maybee a minor or a cristifer ,but thats about it from the list. If you would try to sell one of them you would walk out in handcuffs..There is no way you will see these on the tables,maybee under them...
Im going to take my camera next show in december..
 
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Kris K

New Member
F. labordi

Pardon the intrusion to this forum, I am not a chameleon breeder/keeper per se. But I would be remiss if I did not comment on this thread, which I found by happenstance.

First, I'm very disappointed in the desire of some individuals to support the collection of an IUCN Redlisted species. F. labordi are not legal to export out of Madagascar, regardless of the country of destination, without the proper export and import permits. I can't describe how many hoops I had to jump through just to get CITES permits to export blood samples of this species, so I suspect that nearly 100% of them you find in the pet trade are illegal.

Second, this is a very poor candidate species for captivity. They are an annual species, living for only about 4-5 months during the wet season. It is no surprise that historically when they were legal to export, they were extremely difficult to keep alive for more than a few months. Most people chalked this up to poor husbandry practices, but we now know it's simply a part of their life history.

My completely bias advice is to avoid spending a large sum of money on a chameleon that will not live very long for you in captivity, and at the same time, you would not be supporting the demise of this fragile species. Given its unique life history, you can imagine that large population disturbances (like collectors taking them) before reproduction can result in catastrophic population declines.

I know they are beautiful animals, and I understand the desire to see them and actually have one to admire on a daily basis, but this species simply is not an ideal one for you. Sorry I am not the bearer of better news.
 

Dave Legacy

New Member
Pardon the intrusion to this forum, I am not a chameleon breeder/keeper per se. But I would be remiss if I did not comment on this thread, which I found by happenstance.

First, I'm very disappointed in the desire of some individuals to support the collection of an IUCN Redlisted species. F. labordi are not legal to export out of Madagascar, regardless of the country of destination, without the proper export and import permits. I can't describe how many hoops I had to jump through just to get CITES permits to export blood samples of this species, so I suspect that nearly 100% of them you find in the pet trade are illegal.

Second, this is a very poor candidate species for captivity. They are an annual species, living for only about 4-5 months during the wet season. It is no surprise that historically when they were legal to export, they were extremely difficult to keep alive for more than a few months. Most people chalked this up to poor husbandry practices, but we now know it's simply a part of their life history.

My completely bias advice is to avoid spending a large sum of money on a chameleon that will not live very long for you in captivity, and at the same time, you would not be supporting the demise of this fragile species. Given its unique life history, you can imagine that large population disturbances (like collectors taking them) before reproduction can result in catastrophic population declines.

I know they are beautiful animals, and I understand the desire to see them and actually have one to admire on a daily basis, but this species simply is not an ideal one for you. Sorry I am not the bearer of better news.
Thanks for the supporting contribution, but you've been beaten to the punch on a couple different occasions. Here's just one good example: https://www.chameleonforums.com/please-identify-10984/index3.html
 

Kris K

New Member
It does appear I have been beaten to the punch. As I mentioned, I just happened across this one thread and felt compelled to respond...I unfortunately have not been able to peruse many of the other good threads on the forum. But I think the most important thing is that many responsible people keep sending the same message: Don't support the illegal trade of F. labordi!

Cheers,
Kris
 

Dave Legacy

New Member
I think the most important thing is that many responsible people keep sending the same message: Don't support the illegal trade of F. labordi!

Cheers,
Kris
I could not agree with you more; I just wish there was more I could do.

Best regards,
Dave
 
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