Flapjack Has a "Growth"

Kayos

New Member
I have a pair of Flapjack's. Recently the male has had a growth on his underside. It looks almost like a horn on his tummy. He recently broke a horn, but it is healing nicely. Any ideas what this is? He is eating good and stays a healthy green color most of the time. We feed gut-loaded, dusted crickets. Thanks for any advice!
 
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Tygerr

Avid Member
In South Africa, flapjacks are what we call crumpets. (Well, we also call crumpets 'crumpets', but that's another story). I can understand the naming of the flap-necked chameleon, but I can't really figure out why they call Chamaeleo fuelleborni a 'flapjack' chameleon...

Anyway, mysteries aside, growths can be quite serious and can be the result of any one of a number of problems.

Could you post some pics, and provide more detailed information about your husbandry? That would make it easier to diagnose any obvious problems.
(Read the sticky in the health forum: How to ask for help)

It would probably be quite prudent to take him off to a vet. Even though he is eating well now, and looking healthy, that could change at any moment if there is something wrong with him. Chameleons hide their illnesses well, usually until it is too late.
 
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Laragail

New Member
sorry to get a little off topic here---

but what the hell are crumpets anyway???
I've always wondered what they were, for some reason i associate them with british people

"tea and crumpets anyone?"

are they pancakes?
In the US flapjacks are another word for pancakes.
 

Tygerr

Avid Member
This is what a crumpet is...at least that's what it is in this country...
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Crumpet
Yep, that's what we call a crumpet over here too (Except you should never eat it with Marmite - only a British person would do that...)
However, a lot of people over here also call those flapjacks.

But sometimes we have pancakes that are called flapjacks that are like American pancakes, but most of the time the pancakes we have are actually crepes.

Ah, the joys of mixed colonial heritage... :)
 
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