Eggs- infertile vs fertile

TayloredExotics

Established Member
Just wanted to post an example of the size difference between fertile (1st pic) and infertile (2nd pic) eggs. This is the first fertile clutch produced from my female (who will be 3 years in August), which I believe is why there was such a high proportion of infertile eggs. She was mated 31 May, began digging 28 June, and laid 01 July.

Also, one 'double' egg (2nd pic); note this would usually be an indicator that the female may be egg bound and having trouble passing remaining eggs. Normally it would be cause for an immediate vet visit and x-rays; however, it has only been a month since she mated, and she is currently active and eating like normal, so it was most likely a fluke.
 

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kinyonga

Chameleon Queen
You said..."This is the first fertile clutch produced from my female (who will be 3 years in August), which I believe is why there was such a high proportion of infertile eggs. She was mated 31 May, began digging 28 June, and laid 01 July"... IMHO the reason for so many infertile eggs is more likely where she was in her cycle when she mated. When did she last lay eggs?

You said...,Also, one 'double' egg (2nd pic); note this would usually be an indicator that the female may be egg bound and having trouble passing remaining eggs. Normally it would be cause for an immediate vet visit and x-rays; however, it has only been a month since she mated, and she is currently active and eating like normal, so it was most likely a fluke"...why do you think a double egg would be an indication of eggbinding?
 

TayloredExotics

Established Member
Is the double egg fertile?

No, I think they're both infertile; both are pretty small. I'm going to hold onto all the probable infertile eggs until they mold anyway, though.

IMHO the reason for so many infertile eggs is more likely where she was in her cycle when she mated. When did she last lay eggs?

Ooh, that's a good point, didn't think of it. She had been in her receptive colors for almost a week at that point. I actually hadn't planned to breed her (though I'm not disappointed); my male figured out what to do after 3 years of not knowing what he was suppose to do with a receptive female... I let them out together for a few hours when she's receptive,as it seems not to stress her out, and make him happy to be near her. After two years of doing this, he latched on instead of just walking past over and over 🤔

why do you think a double egg would be an indication of eggbinding?
I would normally assume any oddly shaped or stuck together eggs would be a good indication or egg binding. Maybe I'm paranoid, though 😄 Since this one looks like two infertile eggs glued together with calcium, rather than a double yolk or similar, it could have been a sign of an egg retained too long and made to have too many calcium layers added.
 

kinyonga

Chameleon Queen
You said.....
"No, I think they're both infertile; both are pretty small. I'm going to hold onto all the probable infertile eggs until they mold anyway, though"... It's always a good idea to keep eggs until they are no good for sure IMHO.


You said..."Ooh, that's a good point, didn't think of it. She had been in her receptive colors for almost a week at that point. I actually hadn't planned to breed her (though I'm not disappointed); my male figured out what to do after 3 years of not knowing what he was suppose to do with a receptive female... I let them out together for a few hours when she's receptive,as it seems not to stress her out, and make him happy to be near her. After two years of doing this, he latched on instead of just walking past over and over 🤔".... It's funny how some of them can't seem to figure it out.
I've seen quite a few cases of clutches that contain a lot of infertile eggs for the first time they are mated especially.

You said..."I would normally assume any oddly shaped or stuck together eggs would be a good indication or egg binding. Maybe I'm paranoid, though 😄 Since this one looks like two infertile eggs glued together with calcium, rather than a double yolk or similar, it could have been a sign of an egg retained too long and made to have too many calcium layers added"...I've seen quite a few eggs attached like this...they usually contain two babies in separate sacs....and usually when they hatch, one pips into the other egg and suffocates and the second one ends up pipping head out and survives....so if it is viable, be aware of this.
 

TayloredExotics

Established Member
Oops, forgot to answer your other question! She last laid early January.

I hadn't considered that it being the male's first time could affect fertility as well, but that makes sense.

That sounds terrible 🥺 If the double does end up fertile, would it be worth separating it out and candling constantly once siblings begin to hatch? Or do you think the handling/humidity differences would be more likely to harm the babies than increase their chances?
 

kinyonga

Chameleon Queen
You definitely don't have to worry about the double egg until it's almost time to hatch. Its hard to know if the one baby has pipped into the other egg or not, so its hard to save it. If one baby pipped with its head at the free end of the egg...then I'd be concerned about the other one having already pipped no died...so at that point it's likely too late for the other one anyway.
This is hard to explain.

It would be interesting/helpful IMHO if we knew whether eggs were always laid head first or but first or randomly. I have a feeling that the baby that pips into the other egg, is the one that would have been laid first if it hadn't joined on to the other one...so I have a feeling that it means that one will always pip into the other egg before the head pips out of the one facing the right way...all guessing...no real proof.
 

TayloredExotics

Established Member
That's a good thought; it might've something like how mammals usually come out head first, with breech being less likely. Though I suppose an egg has more symmetry/is less likely to get stuck than a bundle of limbs. Unfortunately, I've never been able to move a gecko egg without breaking it, so I definitely wouldn't try to separate any twin chameleon egg 😔 Seems like some babies get a much slimmer chance at life, and there's not much we can do to even the odds
 

aramis32

Member
Hi guys i have a clutch of 16 eggs that have been laid 5 and 1/2 months ago. I kept them at 74 F in a plastic box with vermiculite (moist) and put the box in a polystyrene box with an airmat separating the heatmat and plastic box.

they have grown massively and turned slightly paler from when they were laid.

are they fertile? If so how to prepare for the hatching? Its my first time doing this..

thanks
 

Lindasjackson

Chameleon Enthusiast
Hi there! Welcome. There are a lot of very knowledgeable people here that I’m sure can help you but you need to start your own thread under the chameleon breeding forum for them to see your question. It’s lost under this old thread. So post a new post and you’ll get people’s attention. I don’t really know anything about eggs so I’m no help. Sorry!
 

aramis32

Member
Hi there! Welcome. There are a lot of very knowledgeable people here that I’m sure can help you but you need to start your own thread under the chameleon breeding forum for them to see your question. It’s lost under this old thread. So post a new post and you’ll get people’s attention. I don’t really know anything about eggs so I’m no help. Sorry!
Thanks!
 
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