early signes of burns?/misting water temp to cold?

jerseyrugby21

New Member
i was just curious about if anyone though experiance was aware of a certin way to catch early signs of burns?

also i am misting with some water that is at room temperature (67ish F) but my cham always seems to dart away from the mist and hid. is i possible the the water is to cold and if so should i try to warm it up somehow? maybe put a heat pad under the bucket etc..?
 

carol5208

Chameleon Enthusiast
Put HOT water in the mister and it will come out warm. Make sure you check it on your hand or arm first that it is ok to spray on your cham and cage. I would say the best prevention for burns is to make sure no part of your chameleon can touch the screen under the basking light when he basks. Of course, you have no control over the fact that if he young and small that he mightl climb and hang on the screen top under the basking light. They figure out pretty quick that it is hot though!!. My cham fortunately never got burned but took a few risks on the top under the light a couple of times but let go pretty fast. Edit: I use a hand mister so I put in hot water or you can microwave the water also. Do not have auto mister if that is what you are talking about.
 

Carlton

Chameleon Enthusiast
i was just curious about if anyone though experiance was aware of a certin way to catch early signs of burns?

also i am misting with some water that is at room temperature (67ish F) but my cham always seems to dart away from the mist and hid. is i possible the the water is to cold and if so should i try to warm it up somehow? maybe put a heat pad under the bucket etc..?
Another thing that can help a cham who hates being sprayed is to mist all around him on the foliage not the cham directly. That's another reason having more thick foliage in the cage is better than less. If you can use your water straight from the tap, use hot water. If you have to leave the water out or treat it first, you can just microwave it before misting. Test the temp. If it feels hot to YOU (a mammal who's normal temp is 98.6F) it will really feel hot to a cham. What feels luke warm to you will still feel pretty warm to a cham.

To prevent burns it is safer to stray a bit on the cooler side of the basking temp (especially for juveniles) rather than the warmer. Burns result from a combination of two things...hot temp and length of exposure. If there is a really sharp temp gradient in your cage (ie: your room is much cooler than the basking area) the cham will tend to sit under the heat longer and is more likely to burn itself. But, if the actual basking temp is on the cooler side the cham can safely sit under it longer to warm up in the morning. It is a balancing act unfortunately.
 

ponders

Chameleon Enthusiast
For noticing burns early:

My panther's colors changed into his nighttime colors in just the burn area (from blue & green to yellow & red). I thought this was curious, but in the next few days realized that he actually burned his back.

They can also get a black spot in the burn area.

You should apply Silvadene cream ASAP by prescription @ the vet's or pharmacy.
 

jerseyrugby21

New Member
yea this thing is because i work constantly and attend school full time i ended up getting the mistking so i dont have much control when it comes to misting around him or the tempiture because i am using a 5 gal bin for storage of the water
 

DeviousMike

New Member
yea this thing is because i work constantly and attend school full time i ended up getting the mistking so i dont have much control when it comes to misting around him or the tempiture because i am using a 5 gal bin for storage of the water
Your cham will just have to suck it up and take the misting like a champ :D Just remember that in the wild, they will get rained on and precipitation created high up in the atmosphere is not lukewarm.
 
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