Drainage assistance please!

Arpretty

Avid Member
I’m at an impasse with my drainage situation. I have a recessed circular center drain and rocks on two sides to help create a flow towards the drain. I’ve been periodically pushing down on the rocks to help create that flow. But, standing water nonetheless!

The bottom panel (PVC) is not removable; it is siliconed to the frame. The stand is a wooden piece of furniture. Any tips or suggestions?? CE27C24D-2977-4722-B507-8C373A360629.jpeg
7F18A22A-19D3-4549-9EB3-BD074D822D97.jpeg772DEDF3-D1E2-4B8D-BF9C-FFB8464BFA49.jpeg
 

Tige21v

Avid Member
It should be ok, as long as it dries out in a reasonable amount of time.
You could always use a heat gun to soften the pvc around the drain to create a permanent slope, but I don't know what the heat would do to that finished surface
 

Arpretty

Avid Member
It should be ok, as long as it dries out in a reasonable amount of time.
You could always use a heat gun to soften the pvc around the drain to create a permanent slope, but I don't know what the heat would do to that finished surface
Ah, that’s an idea! This is the one variable that’s totally stumped me...
I do have a roll of screen ready, I’ve just been testing the functionality of the drain before sliding that in there.
 

Flick boy

Chameleon Enthusiast
The heat gun option i would have a long think about if you warp that bottom which is attached to everything else it could have way more consequences than just ruining your finish
 

Klyde O'Scope

Chameleon Enthusiast
Personally, I would not use a heat gun on this.
What's directly beneath the enclosure floor? Is there space between it and the stand?
How well is the drain attached?

My thinking is, if there's a gap beneath the floor, and the drain is firmly attached, pulling down on the drain should bow the floor enough to create some pitch. If that works, a cross piece can be anchored to the drain PVC to keep the tension applied. Eventually, the floor should warp to that shape.

Hope I'm explaining this clearly.
 

Arpretty

Avid Member
Personally, I would not use a heat gun on this.
What's directly beneath the enclosure floor? Is there space between it and the stand?
How well is the drain attached?

My thinking is, if there's a gap beneath the floor, and the drain is firmly attached, pulling down on the drain should bow the floor enough to create some pitch. If that works, a cross piece can be anchored to the drain PVC to keep the tension applied. Eventually, the floor should warp to that shape.

Hope I'm explaining this clearly.
I like where you’re heading with this... the enclosure sits flush on top of the stand, there is not a gap. The drain is heavily siliconed in, but I think that pushing on it could pop it out... that’s why I’ve been pushing on the rocks surrounding it instead. I am trying to figure out a way to warp the floor towards the center. I think that’s my best bet.
Attached a picture of the enclosure base and stand. CE880A99-40B5-4650-87D8-84D462C5A37A.jpeg
 

Klyde O'Scope

Chameleon Enthusiast
Yeah, elevating the stand on short feet or pads even a half inch would do.
There's got to be a slight gap; hold da phone...
According to the engineering dwg. (2nd image) there should be 1/4" gap, and 1/4" per foot slope is all you'd need.

How well the drain is attached could be the problem. Any way to reinforce it?

I'm doing something similar (sloping the floor for drainage) with a tortoise enclosure I'm designing.
That application is a bit more challenging because it's rectangular and requires a compound slope.
 

Arpretty

Avid Member
Yeah, elevating the stand on short feet or pads even a half inch would do.
There's got to be a slight gap; hold da phone...
“Hold da phone” made me smile ^ :D

Agree, I’m thinking slight spacers are the way to go. Last night I piled some heavy books, the two rocks, and 5 lb weight on top of the drainage area lol. Hoping that will create a slope! So far the drain itself seems to be fine, i.e. not popping out of the bottom.
 

ZEROPILOT

Avid Member
I've got REPTIBREEZE pans in all of my cages with 2" center holes drilled for drains.
Those are also flat.
I have the same issue. However, a few potted plants help slurp up the extra standing water.
There really IS a need for those dished bottom trays!
 

Klyde O'Scope

Chameleon Enthusiast
Mine has a flat drain pan too. I put the drain in the front wall (didn't want to drill a hole in the table), and tilted the whole shebang (enclosure, pan, and the table it's sitting on) slightly forward by putting shims under the back 2 table legs. Not ideal, but it works.
 

ZEROPILOT

Avid Member
Mine has a flat drain pan too. I put the drain in the front wall (didn't want to drill a hole in the table), and tilted the whole shebang (enclosure, pan, and the table it's sitting on) slightly forward by putting shims under the back 2 table legs. Not ideal, but it works.
I drilled the table. (Made of plastic) and silicone glued/stainless steel screwed it all together.
The cages and the table are one, solid piece now.
The holes are through the bottom trays and through the table.
 

Klyde O'Scope

Chameleon Enthusiast
I drilled the table. (Made of plastic) and silicone glued/stainless steel screwed it all together.
The cages and the table are one, solid piece now.
The holes are through the bottom trays and through the table.
I gathered from previous. A lifetime of DIY projects (and a little poker :rolleyes: ) has taught me to always leave myself some outs if things don't go as planned.

Sometimes I'm just thinking I may not like something a year down the road and might want to redo it with as little hassle/destruction as possible. I did that with my beardie box; I wanted a slate tile backsplash for the back wall, but was thinking... "What if I don't like it, or I find a color or tiles I like better,or want to give it a makeover for a future tenant?" So instead of attaching the backsplash directly to the enclosure back, I attached it to an 1/8" thick removable backer board. The tile floor isn't cemented or grouted in either, but that actually makes cleaning easier, and no grout to seal every year or two.

Same with this 'meleon enclosure. I'm already thinking of replacing it with a different one, so I'm glad I didn't drill the table or do anything more permanent. Also, if I sell the enclosure, it'll be in better shape not having done any major surgery on it.

OTOH, I understand folks who want to get something done and never have to mess with it again. I've done that too with some projects, but not until I had all the bugs worked out. ;)
 
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