Does incubation temperature determine sex of babies?

ferretinmyshoes

Veterinarian
Staff member
I know incubation temperature determines the sex of the babies in turtles and some other reptile species but I was under the impression that chameleons were not that way. But since I've now had 7 out of 8 brev babies hatch all male I'm beginning to wonder...the only female baby was incubated over the winter when temperatures started in the lower range. Both her other clutchmates were male though. Since then eggs have been incubating around 78 degrees, which is the coolest I can keep them without buying something, and they have all been male.

Any breeders of brevs or other species that have seen a similar trend? Or haven't? Thanks :)

Just had another baby hatch (#8!) and his sibling will hatch any minute now! :D
 
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okiroo

Avid Member
mabey it does. ever been tested>? you should incubate one clutch on a lower and one on a higher and c if the sexes are effected by that,
 

okiroo

Avid Member
bump! haha sorry im testing my signature. trying to prefect it! why didnt the color show up :(
 

kinyonga

Chameleon Enthusiast
Ferret said..."Nobody ever comments on any of my threads"...poor ferret. :(

"Because most of the viable range of incubation temperatures for the veiled chameleon was included in the experiment, if TSD occurred in this species, it ought to have been exhibited in the sex-ratio of the hatchlings. However, after comparing sex ratios at all temperatures, no significant differences existed."...
http://www.chameleonnews.com/08FebLong.html

http://www.biol.vt.edu/faculty/andrews/And_TSD.pdf
 

ferretinmyshoes

Veterinarian
Staff member
Thanks kinyonga! I was hoping you had a paper stashed somewhere on this subject. I know I read up on it at one point just because I was curious and I remember seeing there wasn't a correlation. I guess it's just because I want girls that I keep getting boys. :)
 

kinyonga

Chameleon Enthusiast
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Zen Reptiles

Avid Member
Has any research been done on this other than on veileds?

There are like 180 species of chameleons. It's not like alligators or leopard geckos...

In my panthers, they were kept around 75F with some fluctuations and cooling, and hatched 50% female 50% male.
 
Ferret, that's because you and Kinyonga are above most of our paygrades!. We come to you guys for the answers!. Although I love the more serious banter, it is a refreshing change!. Motherlode had a great thread as well earlier.
And Kinyonga, again encyclopedia! It is meant as a compliment of the highest form!
 

ferretinmyshoes

Veterinarian
Staff member
Thanks guys for the input! I'm sure it hasn't been studied extensively in very many species, which is why I was hoping to gather some responses from breeders to see if there were any trends. Just had baby #9 hatch, and it's another boy. I guess I'm going to have to start selling these cuties since I can't have a ton of separate cages for all the boys! The hubby would not be pleased...



Thanks for the other links kinyonga! Wish all the articles I had to read were on reptiles. ;)
 
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fluxlizard

New Member
It may depend on species.
I remember reading in an older cham book (maybe the tfh chams vol 1 or 2 schmidt tamm wallikewitz, maybe an old chameleons natures jewels) that for dilepis (I think?) the incubation temp of the author(s) was resulting in all females at the time.
 
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