Desert species?

morg59jeep

New Member
Hello.. I am new here. 15 years ago I raised a pair of Veiled, bred them, incubated and raised the babies until they were big enough for me to feel comfortable selling/gifting them. Shiz happens and I have not kept a chameleon for many years. Sure wish there was forums like this back then.

Thinking about getting another chameleon but was wondering what other species are from drier climates. Any suggestions?
 

kaylie

New Member
Thinking about getting another chameleon but was wondering what other species are from drier climates. Any suggestions?
I also have a Sulcata tortoise and it's very easy compared to a cham. However, it is only 3 months old and very small. They only eat certain types of grass and weeds, not veggies (only on occasion) like what you may read when searching them. And it will get very big in a few years- gotta be able to have a fenced in backyard with your own grass growing and pesticide free. But that's what I'm excited for, a huge tortoise in my yard. And they can live to be like 80, so you have to be willing to put it in your will lol
 

Texas Panther Man

New Member
I think he's looking for a species he could actually find in the pet trade. He's not going to find one of those for sale. And if he could it wouldnt be for anyone but the most exp of keepers. The few who have tried to keep them have failed.
 

adamkwas

Established Member
Chamaeleo namaquensis aren't available in the trade. I think only one (or none, perhaps) have been recorded exported.

Where are you located? Perhaps a Veiled would be best suited for you.
 

pssh

Avid Member
You cannot keep C. namaquensis in captivity.

Species that can handle drier climates (that can be kept in captivity) include: senegals, gracefuls, and flapnecks. Panthers do relatively well in drier climates so long as they receive enough water to stay hydrated and enough mistings to keep their skin and eyes healthy. Of course all captive chameleons need mistings for their eyes and skin as well as hydration, so there is no way around that.
 

Chris Anderson

Dr. House of Chameleons
Staff member
I said it was listed on Appendix II of CITES "illegal in pet trade" just figured it was interesting true Desert Chameleon.
Jack - Almost all chameleon species (except for B. perarmata, which is CITES Appendix I, and all the Rhampholeon species with the exception of Rh. spinosus) are listed on Appendix II of CITES as well. CITES Appendix II only means that their trade is monitored, not illegal.

Adam - Ch. namaquensis have been legally exported from Namibia before. They've been kept in captivity here in the US and in Europe and I know there are some currently in captive collections in Europe. The issue with keeping them is giving them water appropriately.

Chris
 

JackP308

Established Member
Jack - Almost all chameleon species (except for B. perarmata, which is CITES Appendix I, and all the Rhampholeon species with the exception of Rh. spinosus) are listed on Appendix II of CITES as well. CITES Appendix II only means that their trade is monitored, not illegal.

Adam - Ch. namaquensis have been legally exported from Namibia before. They've been kept in captivity here in the US and in Europe and I know there are some currently in captive collections in Europe. The issue with keeping them is giving them water appropriately.

Chris


Im sorry I reread what the listings really meant and I was incorrect on what CITES really stood for, thats why I edited my last post before I read yours chris. Thanks for informing though. Still a cool desert cham!!
 

Texas Panther Man

New Member
i heard that they had trouble duplicating their nutritional needs in captivity. That they needed a diet of mostly beetles and this had hampered efforts.
 

Manik6

Member
That video was freaking awesome. I imagined the male telling the female, "hoe, wheres my money?" lol! Poor girl though.
 
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