Chameleons in Australia

From what i've heard from people living there, there are restrictions on which types of reptiles you can keep in captivity, what can be imported, and as far as i was told you can not keep native animals as pets. realistic, because that is a law in Ontario here. I've never heard anything about Chameleons in Australia, never came across members on here from Australia, etc. so what I'm asking is, is there any type of Chameleon community coming out of the Outbacks?

This just came to mind, because I was actually wondering if any chameleons actually did come from Australia, i doubt it, but you never know.
 
i am almost certain that their are no species native as well, but i am deffinately interested in any trade or movement there.

\that would be so cool thought, Chamaeleo Wombillis Wombillis (the Wombat Chameleon) ::eek::
 

panthercham

New Member
Chams are considered exotic reptiles in Australia and therefore are illegal to keep. There are keepers there but I am not saying anymore....you don't advertise it ;)

Don't really need them though as Oz has many great reptiles that you can keep or find in your backyard :)
 

bradley

New Member
you cannot keep chameleons in australia because they could colonise if let loose. there are only 3 veileds over there that were confiscated from someone and live in a museum
 
Chams are considered exotic reptiles in Australia and therefore are illegal to keep. There are keepers there but I am not saying anymore....you don't advertise it ;)
i wouldn't want you leaking any names and jepordizing someones collection, that is fine.
[/QUOTE]Don't really need them though as Oz has many great reptiles that you can keep or find in your backyard :)[/QUOTE]
very true, australia has awesome herp species, some of the most unique and beautiful

you cannot keep chameleons in australia because they could colonise if let loose. there are only 3 veileds over there that were confiscated from someone and live in a museum
that is craziness, are there any articles about it?



why is australia so strict on exotic animals? are they trying to keep the ecosystem and country as origional and natural as they can by not introducing non native species to it?
 

panthercham

New Member
why is australia so strict on exotic animals? are they trying to keep the ecosystem and country as origional and natural as they can by not introducing non native species to it?
Yes....Google what the Cane Toad has done to Australia and its wildlife.

The 3 Veileds that were found were being kept in captivity and taken from a keeper....they were not in the wild. I have my fingers crossed that none have escaped into the wild. It would devastate some of our smaller native species....
 

eisentrauti

Avid Member
Nope. The only chance is a very specialized predator or a very specific virus/bacteria. Everything else will harm the indigenous fauna more than the toads
 
i've seen that they have project groups that go out and catch hundreds at times. i know there are millions, but is this a sad deception to make them feel they are doing something great? or are they continuing to make improvements, if any were made before without the use of pesticides and exterminations. i think that is what you were getting at right benny? correct me if i am wrong please.
 

eisentrauti

Avid Member
To catch them is a drop in the bucket. The females can lay per year 10000s of eggs. Even if just 1 % of those juveniles reach adolescense you can imagine the growth rate of their contribution area. The maximum growth rate of their total number is 25% per year. As an example, you have 1000 toads at the beginning, 50 years later you have over 7 million of them !
 
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fluxlizard

New Member
Laws depend on what region of australia you live in.

Some regions you can have native herps as long as you have permit.

No non-native species are allowed into the country. Natives are not allowed out.

I have a few books by australian herpers on keeping lizard species there that I keep here. The quality of husbandry at the time they were published (several years ago) was much lower than ours. I was pretty disappointed actually- I ordered the books from australia hoping to get some hot tips on husbandry of these species in their native environment, especially brumation conditions. Didn't get much useful info out of them...
 

eisentrauti

Avid Member
The quality of husbandry at the time they were published (several years ago) was much lower than ours. I was pretty disappointed actually- I ordered the books from australia hoping to get some hot tips on husbandry of these species in their native environment, especially brumation conditions. Didn't get much useful info out of them...
On guy keeps and breeds! Varanus varius in a wodden terrarium with a handfull m³s...
 
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